Re-thinking Workplace Learning: extracting rather than adding

Charles Jennings

One clear finding presented was that: “t hose activities that are integrated into manager and employee workflow have the largest impact on employee performance, while those that are distinct events separate from the day-to-day job have less impact.”

Managing Learning?

Charles Jennings

LMS technology emerged from a need to automate process management and record-keeping systems in the post-World War II era when the focus was on industrialisation and the development of mass production techniques.

PKM 225

The Best of Times, The Worst of Times: opportunities and challenges for the L&D profession

Charles Jennings

All-in-all the implication for L&D professionals has been to make their traditional offerings of carefully designed, time-consuming and often slowly developed structured modules, courses and programmes relevant to fewer and fewer stakeholder needs.

Survey 235

The Only Person Who Behaves Sensibly Is My Tailor

Charles Jennings

We measure how many people have attended a class or completed an eLearning module, or read a document or engaged in a job swap or in a coaching relationship. Attending a course or completing an eLearning module tells us little apart from the fact that some activity occurred.

The Need to Adapt to the Speed of Change or Die: lessons for L&D from the retail industry

Charles Jennings

Why would you put greater trust in someone who worked for a store with a vested interest not only in encouraging you to buy from them, but also to buy the products that gave them the highest return? Yesterday another great British institution slid into the history books.

Real learning – let’s not confuse it with completing templated exercises

Charles Jennings

Learning professionals spend a significant amount of their time (maybe even the majority) designing and delivering content and then evaluating completions and short-term memory outputs from structured mandatory and compliance training modules and courses.

[berkman] Dries Buytaert: Drupal and sustaining collaborative efforts

David Weinberger

Drupal has 10,000+ modules, 300,000 downloads a month, 1.5M Dries points to a common pattern: From innovation to bespoke systems to products to commoditization. Proprietary software tends to stop at the products stage; it’s hard to become a commodity because proprietary software is too expensive. Module developers can get funded from LSD. The 15,000 modules are maintained by the community. Patches go through a workflow before they reaches me.

Drupal 146

Text-to-Speech Overview and NLP Quality

Tony Karrer

Text-to-speech can create professional voice narration without any recording which provides significant advantages: keeps narrated presentations continuously up to date (it's too time consuming/expensive to rerecord human narration) faster development - streamlined workflow lower costs. Text-to-speech (TTS) is the automatic production of spoken speech from any text input. A better way is to use modulation tags to directly emphasize a word.

Atlantic Workshop on Semantics and Services - Day 1

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

Thus we can develop a workflow ontology in OWL. So ontology modules can be efficiently interchanged. You can get different perspectives to a module. The knowledge base of the 'utilizer' modules are augmented by sets of nominals from 'realizer' modules. After augmentation, the knowledge engines are not expected to take into account the realizer modules any more. Diagram of 'requirements' module). These are defined by other modules.

Module 100