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networked knowledge triad

Harold Jarche

Informal Structure – Influence – Social Leadership. This model of structure, power, and leadership reflects how knowledge flows in a networked society and economy. If you have a large and diverse social (Connectivity) network, everything else will fall into place.

learning in the network era

Harold Jarche

Here are some thoughts on personal and social learning in the network era. By extending the borders of work, through communities of practice and social networks, we can support social learning. diverse networks, strong relationships. Informal Learning Learning NetworkedLearning

networked unmanagement

Harold Jarche

What are fundamental changes necessary to shift the dominant organizational model toward stronger networks and temporary, mutually negotiated hierarchies? Jarche’s Principles of Networked Unmanagement*.

Pulling informal learning

Harold Jarche

Informal learning is mostly Pull. They are also more in control of who Pushes to them, through social networks and other sources of online information. Networked sense-making frameworks like PKM can give more control over one’s learning. Informal Learning

diverse networks, strong relationships

Harold Jarche

Being engaged with a diverse network of people who share their knowledge makes for more effective workers. Understanding how to do this becomes a key business skill in the network era. “We Sharing complex knowledge requires trusted professional relationships.

network management update

Harold Jarche

You cannot manage a network. As networks become the dominant organizational form, the way we think about management has to change, as well as the way those in positions of authority try to influence others. Others need to see what we are contributing to the network.

Information foraging and social networks

George Siemens

But coherence is a personal thing – it’s about how *we* connect information elements and how we use artifacts and narratives to share that coherence. The information foraging model is one approach to consider – as detailed in this presentation: Information Foraging

Network Era Fluency

Harold Jarche

Today, it’s all about networks, something you were most likely not taught about in school. What happens as we become a quadriform society (Tribes +Institutions +Markets +Networks)? Big data is also networked data. We need network fluency.

Learn Informal Learning Informally

Jay Cross

Next month I’ll be offering an experiential workshop on Informal Learning through Jane Hart’s Social Learning Center. Network socially with Socialcast, Buddypress, GoToMeeting, Google+. review models, cases, archetypes of successful informal learning.

Network Era Skills

Harold Jarche

It is only through innovative and contextual methods, the self-selection of the most appropriate tools and work conditions, and willing cooperation, that more productive work can be assured in the network era. Developing these skills, like adding value to information, takes time and practice.

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Networked Professional Development

Harold Jarche

It can sometimes be difficult to see oneself as a node in multiple networks, as opposed to a more conventional position within an organizational hierarchy. But network thinking can fundamentally change our view of hierarchical relationships.

principles of networked management

Harold Jarche

At Red Hat, the enterprise IT company, “managers focus on opportunities, not score-keeping” ‘We also rely on associates’ peers and communities to informally assess how people perform.

Management in Networks

Harold Jarche

In networks, cooperation is more important than collaboration. They cannot see the potential of social networks for enabling sense-making and knowledge-sharing. But the new reality is that networks are the new companies. Knowledge networks differ from company hierarchies.

Networked Knowing

Harold Jarche

The theme was on the changing nature of work as we enter the network era and how learning is becoming integral to individual and organizational success. One hundred years later and we are witnessing a similar shift, from the industrial economy to the network era and a creative economy.

Leadership for the Network Era

Harold Jarche

The TIMN [Tribes + Institutions + Markets + Networks] model shows how society grew from a collection of tribes, added institutions, and later developed markets. The network era began with the advent of electric communications, though it is by no means completely established.

Social networks require ownership

Harold Jarche

So Gartner states that only 10% of social networking roll-outs succeed. Social media, and social networks, change the way we communicate. While people may say it’s not about the technology, unfortunately that’s where a large share of the budget goes in social network initiatives.

Organizational Learning in the Network Era

Harold Jarche

Value from this knowledge is created by groups and spreads through social networks. Learning must be an essential part of doing business in the network era. Connecting in social networks and communities of practice. Learning and working are interconnected in the network era.

Principles of Networked Unmanagement

Harold Jarche

In networks, cooperation trumps collaboration. As we shift to a networked economy, our organizational frameworks have to change. No one has the definitive answer any more but we can use the intelligence of our networks to make sense together and see how we can influence desired results.

Informal rule of thumb

Harold Jarche

Studies show that informal learning accounts for between 70 and 95% of workplace learning [USBLS: 70%; Raybould: 95%; EDC: 70%; CapitalWorks: 75%; OISE: 70%; eLG: 70%; Allen Tough: 80%]. According to Gary, as much as 95% of workplace learning is informal. Informal Learning

Innovation is a network activity

Harold Jarche

But of more importance is the ability of the network (society, organization, company) to stay connected to its collective knowledge in order to keep innovating. If your number of minds working on the problem gets small enough, you can actually begin to lose information.

Informal learning, the 95% solution

Harold Jarche

Tweet Informal learning is not better than formal training; there is just a whole lot more of it. Supporting informal learning at work is not as clear-cut as something like ISD. Today there is no agreed-upon informal learning design methodology. Informal Learning

network leadership = adapting to perpetual beta

Harold Jarche

A similar approach can be developed for today’s networked organizations. Open information and access to our common knowledge assets will be a required part of any new leadership model. Leadership is an emergent property of a network in balance.

Informal Learning – the other 80%

Jay Cross

The start-up stiffed me but the paper morphed into the Informal Learning book. I’ll be leading a series of master classes on informal learning and working smarter in Europe. Informal Learning – the other 80%. Informal learning is effective because it is personal.

Loose Hierarchies, Strong Networks

Harold Jarche

When I wrote that the only knowledge that can be managed is our own , I wanted to highlight that command & control methods do not work well in this network era that is replacing the industrial/information era. Loose hierarchies, strong networks.

networked unlearning

Harold Jarche

Today, we can easily connect to networks that offer diverse views. Social media can facilitate the sharing of tacit knowledge through conversations to inform the collaborative development of emergent work practices. There is no such thing as information overload.

principles and models for the network era

Harold Jarche

But the age of oil is ending, and markets are being replaced by networks as the dominant organizing model. There are also some organizing principles that can give us a common starting point from which to build the new organizations for a network society. The End of the Market Era.

In networks, cooperation trumps collaboration

Harold Jarche

In networks, cooperation trumps collaboration. That’s why you see it in networks. In networks, the nature of the connection is important; it is not simply about quantity and mass …. Collaboration is only part of working in networks.

Networks thrive in complexity

Harold Jarche

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle. Networks thrive in nature. The Internet has given us a glimpse of the power of networks. Real network models (e.g.

Network Learning: Working Smarter

Harold Jarche

Tweet “In the period ahead of us, more important than advances in computer design will be the advances we can make in our understanding of human information processing – of thinking, problem solving, and decision making…” ~ Herbert Simon, Economics Nobel-prize winner (1968).

The role of informal social networks in building organizational creativity and innovation

Ross Dawson

For the last decade I have examined and applied social network analysis in and across organizations, for example in large professional firms , technology purchase decision-making , high-performance personal networks , and other applications. Social networks Uncategorized

It’s the network …

Harold Jarche

Tweet I presented on Managing in a Networked World at DevLearn 2011 today in Las Vegas. Thinking like a node in a network and not as a position in a hierarchy is the first mental shift that’s required to move to a collaborative enterprise.

Build trust, embrace networks, manage complexity

Harold Jarche

Hierarchies, simple branching networks, are obsolete. They work well when information flows mostly in one direction: down. A connected enterprise starts by building a foundation of trust, embracing networks, and then managing complexity. Networks. Hierarchies.

The Untold Costs of Social Networking

Luis Suarez

Little did we know that, fast forward to 2016, all of those networking activities would come with a really high price tag: your own data in unwanted hands. We, human beings, have got an inner urge to wanting to belong to a group, a tribe, a team, a community, a network, you name it.

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a network perspective

Harold Jarche

The three overlapping circles of the network learning model – social networks, communities of practice, work teams – have been described by Patti Anklam as three network types – connectivity, alignment, productivity.

Organising Modern Learning & Networking Events

Jane Hart

This workshop looks at how to organise 4 different types of learning and networking events that use experiential, participative, collaborative and technology-supported approaches. Week 3: Networking Events. for more information.

Networked sharing

Harold Jarche

If your number of minds working on the problem gets small enough, you can actually begin to lose information. There’s a steady state level of information that depends on the size of your population and the interconnectedness.

Controversy over Informal Learning

Jay Cross

When the book on informal learning came out, nay-sayers attacked me as some kind of loony. QUESTION: How do you know that informal learning works? QUESTION: How can we assess the ROI of informal learning? QUESTION: How do you know learning on the job is 80% informal?

Talking about the Network Era

Harold Jarche

Spying on entire populations is another network era phenomenon. Networked, distributed businesses, like AirBNB, are disrupting existing models, with the inevitable push-back as they become successful. Networks will transform education, business, the economy, and society even further.

Want Results? Champion the Informal

Jay Cross

We have an information explosion. I first heard about informal learning was at a conference in Orlando, Florida, a dozen years ago. The scientists discovered than over 80% of the way people learned their jobs was informal. Learning happens in social networks.

It’s all about networks

Harold Jarche

It’s all about networks. Understanding networks that is. It’s the network : Thinking like a node in a network and not as a position in a hierarchy is the first mental shift that’s required to move to a collaborative enterprise.