Sat.Jan 19, 2008 - Fri.Jan 25, 2008

The Failure of Completely Open Networks?

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

Responding to Scott Karp , who writes: Digg’s struggle with gaming is so extreme that they had no choice but to band certain forms of collaboration in a system that is defined by its collaborative nature. What this proves is something that has been known (and resolutely ignored by pundits) for quite some time: that the network effect is not cumulative. People keep portraying ‘the wisdom of crowds’ as though it were some sort of democracy - people vote, and whomever has the most votes wins.

stevenberlinjohnson.com: Outside.in and The Washington Post

Steven Berlin Johnson

this morning we announced our new partnership with the washington post: our buzzmaps for the dc area are now live on the post site. as you'll see, these maps are variations of the buzzmaps we've created for all the bloggers in our

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eLearning Authoring Tool

Tony Karrer

Looking back at my post about eLearning Authoring Tools - and particularly whether custom or off-the-shelf is the way to go, I've been interested in seeing the varied response. Paraphrasing justifications for custom eLearning Authoring Tool approaches: A templated approach provides speed and consistency for repetitive tasks, freeing up time and budget for customizing demonstrations and adding in video and other engaging elements. HTML and JavaScript are likely here to stay.

Final Thoughts on the Evolution towards a Knowledge Economy

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

In the last two weeks I have been writing about my feeling that 2008 might be a key year in the transition to an IT-based knowledge economy. In the first post, I focused on the emergence of the advanced technology platforms needed to deliver a diverse set of information-rich services to a very large number of people.

The Village on Stilts

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

Yesterday morning (or what seems like yesterday, though the calendar says it was 48 hours ago) I got on a train, and then a boat, and within two hours of Kuala Lumpur, found myself at Palau Ketam, a fishing village on a mudflat island in the Strait of Maleka, between Malaysia and Sumatra. It is only with reluctance that my managers will allow such indulgences, and thus only infrequently I am able to take the opportunity.

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Cosmology and Economics

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

Responding to Lanny Arvan. Interesting ramble covering (as usual) a lot of ground. People who have studied the foundations of probability and the foundations of logic recognize a certain arbitrariness to those disciplines. Probability, in particular, can be interpreted three major ways (charaterized by Reichenbach, Carnap and Ramsay) resulting in three different semantics.

Learnlets » 2008 Predictions

Clark Quinn

eLearn, the online elearning magazine, has released it's list of various folks predictions for 2008 (including yours truly). It's a pretty stellar cast (self excluded) and there're some really interesting thoughts, ranging from the

Session Hopping – A Practical Guide

Tony Karrer

I just saw a link by Christy Tucker to a wonderfully funny, but a little too true: On the High Art of Getting Grades Without Learning Anything. It caused me to remember that last year while attending a session at ASTD 2007, a few random people and I were discussing session hopping (prior to a session).

Internet Time Blog » Feedjit

Jay Cross

feedjit is a java applet that displays visits to your blog in real time. at the bottom of the sidebar to the right, you'll find a map and a listing of where visitors are coming from (you're probably on top right now

e-Clippings (Learning As Art): Tell me your latest/greatest books on learning.

Mark Oehlert

books_carrier_civ yes, i am a book-loving geek. even worse, i like bookstores better than i like libraries because i like to write in my books as i read and dog-ear pages and in general, rough them up a bit as i read them

Learnlets » ILS report update (please)!

Clark Quinn

The eLearning Guild's report on Immersive Learning Simulations (disclaimer: I wrote one of the articles) had not only the written component, but data put in by over a 1000 organizational elearning folks, and available as an option

Touch Typing - Cursive Writing - Why?

Tony Karrer

I'm not sure if it's only our school district, but 4th graders (9 year olds) spend considerable time learning cursive writing and are not taught touch typing. This is especially troubling because students certainly are expected to write their assignments on a computer. Oh, that is unless the teacher wants them to write it in cursive just to help them learn how to write in cursive.

Internet Time Blog » The Seventh Annual Conference on Neuroesthetics

Jay Cross

many faces of a face. this morning i drove to the art museum at uc berkeley to attend this day-long, multidisciplinary (and free) conference. my pal zack lynch was in the lobby waiting for the doors to open. the last time we'd seen one