Hard Fun Projects

Clark Quinn

And, it occurred to me, that’s also true for good project work. And those also define a meaningful project for solving in the workplace. The project has to have a clear benefit to the organization. And the team should be appropriately constituted with skills and committed to the project. We can, and should, be setting up our projects to meet these criteria. This is also a possible start to creating a culture of experimentation and continual learning.

Adding aesthetics to culture

Dave Snowden

Many years ago now I worked with anthropologist Beth Meriam to design an approach to cultural mapping using SenseMaker®. It has been the basis of many a project since then with several variations. In effect it has become the underlying Cynefin theory of culture in organisations and society. In developing it we sourced the underlying concepts from cultural anthropology rather than any of the various dominant theories of culture that are popular in organisations.

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culture is complex

Harold Jarche

Most of the projects or applications were ways of eliminating humans from the business process, ensuring purchasers could buy things quicker. The famous quote attributed to Peter Drucker is that “culture eats strategy for breakfast” French culture is not unaffected by international business pressures, as witnessed by the fast food outlets everywhere. Travel helps you understand culture. ” Understanding culture is something that AI cannot do.

The perils of projection

Euen Semple

We create a dependence culture both in society at large and in our organisations. But this allows us all to stay comfortable, to project our worries onto those around us, to stay stuck. We need to understand our projections and take responsibility for them. It is interesting thinking back to the Thatcher era and how polarised we became. You can see it happening now online with the news of her death.

LibraryLab funded project librapalooza

David Weinberger

The Harvard Library Lab , which issues grants for library innovation at the University, is holding a forum in which all the projects get 5 mins to introduce themselves. The names prefacing these blurbs are of the presenters, who are not always the project leads or developers.). where they’re working on the Garibaldi Project , a way of browsing a set of related content. MIT is collaborating on this project).

The Connected Culture

Dan Pontefract

A ‘ connected culture ’ is one that simultaneously drives organizational clarity with precarious innovation. A ‘ connected culture’ , in its simplest, orderly and most chaotic form, refers to the point at which all employees act as one corporate organism. As an organization, in totality, business units, teams and projects are united such that duplication is negated and a selfless amount of contribution is the norm.

Fostering an Innovation Culture: Talent, Discipline and Leadership

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

I was reminded of this point as I read The Hard Truth About Innovative Culture s , an article in a recent issue of the Harvard Business Review (HBR) by Harvard professor Gary Pisano. “A culture conducive to innovation is not only good for a company’s bottom line,” writes Pisano. “It also is something that both leaders and employees value in their organizations.”. Innovative cultures are paradoxical. Innovation has been a hot topic for the past few decades.

Tech2Empower: The Llama Pack Project

Beth Kanter

This team I worked with helped social entrepreneur Alejandra Arias Stella , the co-founder of the Llama Pack Project to build a reservation system for the Llama treks. The next day, the whole group had an opportunity experience The Llama Pack Project first hand, by going on a half-day trek in the Sacred Valley. The Llama Pack Project has literally transformed their lives because they able to earn a decent annual wage with their llamas.

The Connected Culture

Dan Pontefract

A ‘ connected culture ’ is one that simultaneously drives organizational clarity with precarious innovation. A ‘ connected culture’ , in its simplest, orderly and most chaotic form, refers to the point at which all employees act as one corporate organism. As an organization, in totality, business units, teams and projects are united such that duplication is negated and a selfless amount of contribution is the norm.

Cultural change in Singapore

Dave Snowden

I'm back in Singapore for a week working on a portfolio of projects building on work over the past decade. It's exciting to see ideas mature, understanding grow and engagement deepen over time; one of the characteristics of Government in Singapore is that they think and plan over the long term, less driven by the short termism than the UK and the US. I expect to report back on some of that work in future months, this week is scoping and discussing.

Internet culture

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

If someone says a project is finished, it is. Chief Learning Officer magazine , Effectiveness, April 2009. by Jay Cross. The Internet is so pervasive that Internet values are blowing back into real life. For example, I have no qualms about walking out of a boring presentation, even if I’ve been sitting in the front row. The Web trained me to click past unrewarding pages and spend my time where it will do me the most good.

Micro-blogging can help build your organisational culture

Dan Pontefract

As a consequence and according to Gallup Management Journal , this disengaged and disconnected culture (in US-based organisations) is costing $300b per year in lost revenues alone. Moving Towards a Culture of Sharing. According to research published by McKinsey and Company in December, 2010, only 13% of companies felt as though micro-blogging was actually enhancing company culture. Exchanging Ideas; Improving Culture, Knowledge and Networks.

Running SenseMaker® projects and Building signification frameworks - new courses announced

Dave Snowden

They feature some theory on SenseMaker® and narrative research approaches, but emphasise practical aspects with plenty of examples from current projects and past experiences. An Introduction to Running SenseMaker® Projects. It covers some of the key options and decisions needed for an effective project. The day is ideal for those who have overall responsibility for running a SenseMaker® project but have never run one before.

[avignon] Google’s Cultural Institute

David Weinberger

Steve Crossan, head of the Cultural Institute in Paris, is demo-ing Google’s super spiffy swirling virtual bookcase. The Cultural Institute was set up in April. They’re building tools and services for the cultural sector, to help people get to online content in an emotionally engaging way. One pilot project: Dead Sea Scrolls online, searchable and zoomable. In a virtual world, what shall one do with a physical space to explore culture?

Micro-blogging can help build your organisational culture

Dan Pontefract

As a consequence and according to Gallup Management Journal , this disengaged and disconnected culture (in US-based organisations) is costing $300b per year in lost revenues alone. Moving Towards a Culture of Sharing. According to research published by McKinsey and Company in December, 2010, only 13% of companies felt as though micro-blogging was actually enhancing company culture. Exchanging Ideas; Improving Culture, Knowledge and Networks.

Technology, Media and Culture - the Best of Times or the Worst of Times?

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

USC’s Annenberg Innovation Lab (AIL) was founded in 2010 to study the transformational impact of technology on culture and on the media industries. For a technologist like me, it’s been a unique opportunity to learn about the impact of technology on society through the lens of the culture being transformed. How can you best understand the impact of disruptive technologies on something as deeply human as culture? Innovation Society and Culture Technology and Strategy

Micro-Blogging is Good for Leadership, Good for Your Culture

Dan Pontefract

Cross functional – cross pollination projects > less formal/hierarchical teams. So what has this got to do with leadership and culture? Today, employees are normally ‘heard’ when they are in team and project meetings or individual 1-1 sessions. This can do so much for the organization in terms of leadership and culture, including: Better understanding of what is going on in the organization across many teams & projects.

Joho: Culture is an echo chamber

David Weinberger

The main article is, unsurprisingly, the first one: Culture is an echo chamber : We all hate echo chambers in which a bunch of yahoos convince one another that they’re right. Report from the DPLA platform : Surprisingly, I’m interim head of the project building the software platform for the Digital Public Library of America. After a couple of years, I’ve actually published another issue of my old ‘zine. Why so long between issues?

Culture 3 of 7: Identify the big shapes

Dave Snowden

While having specific goals is not possible in a complex system, and any cultural change is complex, it doesn’t mean that we can’t have a sense of direction and/or purpose. So what are the big shapes in culture change? I remember in one IBM project we gave a group of consultants a full time bookkeeper to manage their expenses and timesheets. I’m giving that as a warning and a teaching case – structure can be achieved in many ways and how you do it determines culture.

Is Your Company Culture Linked to Social Learning Success?

Dan Pontefract

A wonderful article was recently posted by Marcia Conner and Steve LeBlanc over at Fast Company entitled “ Where Social Learning Thrives “ The entire piece purports that a fun, productive and consistent culture will help ensure social learning takes flight. What struck me, however, is the following line itself: Social learning thrives in a culture of service and wonder. Tags: Culture social learning collaboration

Managing across Borders and Cultures

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Its mission is succinctly captured in its tag line: Managing across borders and cultures. We prepare individuals and institutions to learn, work and communicate across borders and cultures. Our research projects and studies include global talent (high end knowledge workers), China as an emerging, knowledge-driven economy and society, the growing influence of global corporations, global media and the impact of globalization on American society.

NTEN’s We Are Media Project | Full Circle Associates

Nancy White

Home About Full Circle Contact Resources Wiki Full Circus Full Circle Associates connections for a changing world, online and offline… Jul 27 2008 NTEN’s We Are Media Project Published by Nancy White at 1:25 pm under social media Beth Kanter is stewarding a very cool project for NTEN, We Are Media. There is a veritable blossoming of projects to help people learn about and adopt social media these days.

Q&A With The Authors of A New Culture of Learning

Steve Denning

At a time when the US doesn’t even rank in the top 30 countries in the world in education status, we are fortunate to have a new book: A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change by Douglas Thomas and John Seely Brown (CreateSpace, 2011). In the book, you distinguish two senses of culture. One is the culture of the classroom, where stability and predictability is the norm. Is there any hard work in the new culture of learning?

Create a Collaborative Company Culture with an LMS

TOPYX LMS

Some companies have a culture that is richly collaborative. Does your company host this type of culture? The game plan for creating a collaborative company culture is so simple that it’s easy to miss, and it involves implementing an LMS, or an eLearning system. This entails two learners, or a small group of learners, virtually coming together to complete a project. In 1915, Edward C. Register said, “None of us is as smart as all of us.”

A Conversation with Jason Kunesh: And You Think Your Projects Are Politically Charged!

Adaptive Path

So, I wanted to hear about the Dashboard project that you and your team worked on, if you’d like to share a little about that. You know how it is with software projects. That was definitely not part of the culture that we were working within, so there was a lot of tension there. Tracey Varnell : So Jason Kunesh!

Who "owns" your organization's culture?

Mark Oehlert

Yep, culture. Often it''s like a specter hanging over failed projects - "the culture wasn''t prepared to accept that technology." We talk about it''s importance and about having the right one and about disruptive ones and innovation ones but I think we need to be a bit more basic up front. . The first thing you need to understand about organizational culture is that you already have one. Want a culture that makes people at all levels feel that they have input?

Legitimate cultural difference or barbaric rite?

Dave Snowden

Now both of these are cases under the general heading of whether unique cultural practices should be tolerated with the secondary question of whether should be tolerated over there, but not over here. Recognition of cultural mores is important, so I could see separate streams for religion within the same school. The more people know people across cultures the better and a bit of social engineering is a small price to pay.

A Conversation with Jason Kunesh: And You Think Your Projects Are Politically Charged!

Adaptive Path

So, I wanted to hear about the Dashboard project that you and your team worked on, if you’d like to share a little about that. You know how it is with software projects. That was definitely not part of the culture that we were working within, so there was a lot of tension there. Tracey Varnell : So Jason Kunesh! You’re the Director of User Experience for Obama for America and essentially, the first UX guy to be involved in a presidential campaign in the history of UX.

neuro culture

Mind Hacks

neuro culture is a beautiful and interesting website that tracks the interaction between neuroscience and visual art as it develops across the world. These ongoing transformations in science and society are deeply pervading popular culture and are appearing in a profusion of media and artistic expanse- from the visual arts to film, theatre, novels and advertisements. Link to neuro culture

Does Your Nonprofit Suffer from Fire Drill Culture?

Beth Kanter

Last week, I was honored to do several workshops hosted by the Fund for Santa Barbara on how nonprofits can link a culture of well being to outcomes based on my book, The Happy Healthy Nonprofit: Strategies for Impact without Burnout. In Santa Barbara, a common theme was that their nonprofits operated in “Crisis Mode” all the time and it has created a culture of stress. Crisis As Workplace Culture. Culture becomes one of detachment and disengagement.

Who "owns" your organization's culture?

Mark Oehlert

Yep, culture. Often it's like a specter hanging over failed projects - "the culture wasn't prepared to accept that technology." We talk about it's importance and about having the right one and about disruptive ones and innovation ones but I think we need to be a bit more basic up front. . The first thing you need to understand about organizational culture is that you already have one. Want a culture that makes people at all levels feel that they have input?

Will AI Ever Be Smarter Than a Baby?

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

A cutting-edge research project in Berkeley’s AI Lab is trying to develop AIs that are similarly curious active learners. Culture is our nature, and it makes our learning particularly powerful.

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Nonprofit Organizational Culture Eats Big Data for Lunch

Beth Kanter

Culture Eats Big Data for Lunch – Guest Post by Steve MacLaughlin. The business management guru Peter Drucker is often quoted as saying “Culture eats strategy for breakfast.” It is also clear that culture eats Big Data for lunch. Any strategy or plan to use Big Data is likely to be devoured if the culture of an organization is not supportive. Now, culture is also an overused term these days.

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Tips for Activating a Culture of Wellbeing in the Nonprofit Workplace

Beth Kanter

Last month, I was honored to present and facilitate an all-day workshop for nonprofit leaders at the Oregon Nonprofit Leadership Conference on how to activate a culture of well being in the nonprofit workplace, based on my book, The Happy Healthy Nonprofit: Strategies for Impact without Burnout. Many times the reaction to focusing on organizational culture and wellbeing is considered “soft” or “nice” stuff that not lead to results or impact.

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Do You Work for A Nonprofit That Promotes A Culture of Wellbeing in the Workplace?

Beth Kanter

A few weeks ago, I wrote a blog post called “ Why the Nonprofit Work Ethic Is Outdated and Needs Change ,” about why nonprofit professionals need to pay attention to self-care and bring a culture of wellbeing into the nonprofit workplace. (The Gabriela knows that practicing self-care is important, but it is just as important that the workplace culture embraces employee wellbeing. Gabriela Schneider, Chief Communications Officer at Issue One.

The Changing Nature of the Liberal Arts in the Digital Economy

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Research projects that once lasted a lifetime now require much less time. The project found that sentimental and moralistic words like integrity, modesty, sensibility, and reason fell increasingly out of fashion from roughly 1% of all words in 1785 to 0.5%

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Social Media Benchmarking: Gauging Success for Project and Organizations in Global Health and Development

Beth Kanter

That’s why I have developed the “Crawl, Walk, Run, Fly” maturity of practice framework into a benchmarking tool – so it can quantify the level of maturity of one 13 different practices in the areas of: culture, capacity, measurement, monitoring, engagement, content, and network building. Social Media Benchmarking: Gauging Success for Project and Organizations in Global Health and Development. Flickr Photo by Kevlar.

Is Your Corporate Culture The Root Cause Of Bad Meetings?

Dan Pontefract

The meeting I was invited to was the kick-off to a project to consolidate several redundant processes into something that was more effective. While I still bear emotional scars from this story—and have since eaten at The French Laundry—when I was reflecting upon it recently, it got me thinking about meeting etiquette, the behaviour of collaboration and everyone’s favourite, organizational culture and leadership. Culture meetings

When Culture Eats Your Foundation’s Social Media Strategy for Breakfast

Beth Kanter

Yesterday, I had the honor of facilitating a workshop on culture change and social media at the Council on Foundations Conference for Community Foundations in San Francisco. John Kobara, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, California Community Foundation, was the session designer and introduced the session with a famous quote from Peter Drucker, ”Culture eats strategy for breakfast.” Does it take a natural disaster to change a culture?

Treat Your Social Media Measurement Like A 6th Grader’s Science Fair Project!

Beth Kanter

Note from Beth: Both my kids have worked on projects for their school’s science fair. My daughter’s project involved testing different potting soils to see one was better for seed germination. As I was helping her translate the data in excel spreadsheet into a line graph, I realized that the project was essentially an a/b test. Flickr Photo by the Consortium.

Why Business Transformation Efforts Often Fail

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

A vision says something that helps clarify the direction in which an organization needs to move… Without a sensible vision, a transformation effort can easily dissolve into a list of confusing and incompatible projects that can take the organization in the wrong direction or nowhere at all.”

Measuring the Effectiveness of Social Distancing Policies

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

One of the most interesting projects in the MIT Connection Science group I ’ m affiliated with is The Atlas of Inequality. Over time, the project will be expanded to cities around the world.

Why Some AI Efforts Succeed While Many Fail

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Among Pioneers, 35% have invested in 20 or more AI projects, double that of Experimenters and Investigators. Rather, Pioneers focus on projects with the potential for transformative impact, and they accept that doing so entails greater uncertainty than less transformative projects.

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