Learn Informal Learning Informally

Jay Cross

Next month I’ll be offering an experiential workshop on Informal Learning through Jane Hart’s Social Learning Center. Hands-on experiential learning. Collaborate with a self-organizing team to solve problems. The month-long event is appropriate for decision-makers, designers, CLOs, innovation leaders, managers of communications, and others who want to accelerate learning in their organization. You learn by doing.

Collaborative co-design

Clark Quinn

In my previous post , I mentioned that we needed to start thinking about designing not just formal learning content, or formal learning experiences, but learning experiences in the context of the informal learning resources (job aids, social tools), and moreover, learning in the context of a workflow. In short, tying back to my post on collaboratively designing job aids, I think we need to be collaboratively designing workflows.

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Dear C-Suite: We Don’t Do Training Anymore

Dan Pontefract

It’s time to help the C-Suite – aside from Peter Aceto and other learning savvy and employee engagement focused C-Suite leaders – to appreciate and understand that organizations don’t do training anymore. Sure, for the purists and traditionalists in the learning space who are hell-bent to ensure the ‘sage on the stage’ continues, I’m certain they will scoff at the very mention of trying to erase the term training from Oxford’s illustrious dictionary.

Standalone LMS is Still Dead (rebutting & agreeing w/ Dave Wilkins)

Dan Pontefract

Last week, Dave Wilkins of Learn.com wrote a piece entitled “ A Defense of the LMS (and a case for the future of social learning) ”. Formal learning needs to blend with any informal and social learning output in the new world. (ie. Informal or social learning needs to blend with formal learning. What we need to do is ensure we weave a formal, informal and social learning workflow together. Why Learning 2.0 & Enterprise 2.0

Training Evaluation: a mug’s game

Harold Jarche

Dan Pontefract is quite clear in Dear Kirkpatrick’s: You still don’t get it : Let me be clear – training is not an event; learning is a connected, collaborative and continuous process. It can and does occur in formal, informal and social ways every day in and out of your job. The ‘event’ is not solely how learning occurs. Event-based instructional interventions, or the course as learning vehicle, is an outdated and useless way to look at workplace learning.

Vendor-neutral

Harold Jarche

Last year I wrote , “Now social learning is being picked up by software vendors and marketers as the next solution-in-a-box, when it’s more of an approach and a cultural mind-set.&# In 2005, social learning online was a fringe activity that we had to test using open source platforms like Drupal. I remember when we ran our informal learning unworkshops in 2006 while the major enterprise software vendors ignored us or privately told us there was no market for this stuff.

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Take off those rose coloured glasses

Harold Jarche

Training is only 5% of organizational learning , but for a long time this small slice has been the primary focus of most Learning & Development (L&D) departments. The other 95% was just taken care of by the informal networks in the organization. All those informal networks became hyper-connected. Social media are fantastic tools to support organizational collaboration and informal learning. Enable Learning. Support Learning.

The Other 90% of Learning

Jay Cross

Knowledge workers learn three to four times as much from experience as from interaction with bosses, coaches, and mentors. They learn about twice as much from those conversations compared to structured courses and programs. It’s a handy framework to keep in mind, particularly when someone mistakenly thinks all learning is formal. As Charles Handy has written, “Real learning is not what most of us grew up thinking it was.”. Learning is social. Informal Learning

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Once more, across that chasm

Harold Jarche

Workflow Learning (including wider acceptance of performance support instead of training). A year later the use of blogs had exploded, while workflow learning had stalled and I noted that an understanding of the value of informal learning was catching on. Informal learning is being discussed throughout the profession, but in many cases it’s just lipstick on a pig. Tags: Informal Learning Technology

making time for learning

Harold Jarche

For over a decade I have promoted the idea that work is learning & learning is the work. It seems the idea has now gone mainstream, as it’s even noted in Forbes that, “Work and learning will become analogous” It is much easier to just say that workflow learning is essential rather than putting in the structures and practices that can enable it. Social and informal learning are key to increasing insights that can drive innovation.

Workforce Development Services: A new framework of training and learning support

Jane Hart

In my last blog post, From Social Learning to Workforce Collaboration , I talked about how I have been helping organisations support workforce collaboration. Following that post Dan Pontefract asked me this question: “Is this something that helps an external consultant, like yourself and ITA more so than it does those working inside an organization in a traditional ‘learning’ team?” Collaboration Social learning

Thinking Transformation

Clark Quinn

It’s about not just courses on a phone, but: Augmenting formal learning: extending it. Social: tapping into the power of social and informal learning. It’s about extending formal learning, not just delivering it.

Why You Must Define the So-What of Learning

Dan Pontefract

Whether you work for a private family-owned business, a publicly traded corporation or in the kindergarten-to-higher-education continuum somewhere, you’re going to have to define learning – whether it’s for your employees, colleagues or students. So let’s examine the “so what” learning definition – meaning why learning is present in organizations. In my opinion, learning is part formal, informal and social. social learning Culture social

Some thoughts from 2012

Harold Jarche

Informal Learning: The 95% Solution. Informal learning is not better than formal training; there is just a whole lot more of it. It’s 95% of workplace learning, according to the research reviewed by Gary Wise. To create real learning organizations , there is a choice. Effective organizational collaboration comes about when workers regularly narrate their work within a structure that encourages transparency and shares power & decision-making.

Summarizing Learn for Yourself

Jay Cross

I just copied a rough draft of my new book, Learn For Yourself , into a free summarizer. It’s all a matter of learning, but it’s not the sort of learning that is the province of training departments, workshops, and classrooms. You are learning to learn how to become the person you wrote the obit for. It’s learning to know versus learning to be. Most of what we learn, we learn by interacting with others.

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LMS vs. LCMS

Xyleme

The Learning and Development industry, like any other, has been inundated with new technologies and tools for learning. Buzz words in the industry include e-learning, mobile learning, cloud delivery, bite-sized learning, informal learning, learning record store, and single-source content development. Another important learning tool that some may not be familiar with is a Learning Content Management System (LCMS).

It’s Only 65% !

Charles Jennings

The researchers (possibly on work experience) declared that “ 50:26:24 is the average learning mix in most companies right now ”. The report of the 50:26:24 survey went on to say: “It’s widely accepted that the 70:20:10 model is the most effective learning blend for business, but getting to that perfect mix can be a challenge. It also got me thinking about approaches to organisational learning in general. Learning ? Learning is a process not an event.

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2012: That was the year that was

Jane Hart

1 - The Top 100 Tools for Learning 2012 list is revealed. On 1 October 2012 I revealed the results of the 6th Annual Survey of Tools for Learning – the Top 100 Tools for Learning 2012 – and provided a brief analysis of the results. 2 - 10 things to remember about social learning (and the use of social media for learning). 3 - Only 14% think that company training is an essential way for them to learn in the workplace.

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Start with the 70. Plan for the 100.

Charles Jennings

Checklists to rate your own organisation’s ability to deliver the critical tasks supporting 70:20:10 Nine ‘cameos’ written by leading thinkers and practitioners including Dennis Mankin (Platinum Performance), Nigel Harrison (Performance Consulting), Clark Quinn (Quinnovation), Jane Hart (Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies), Bob Mosher (APPLY Synergies), Jack Tabak (Chief Learning Officer, Royal Dutch Shell), Jane Bozarth (US Government) and others.

LMS vs. LCMS

Xyleme

While sometimes thought to be interchangeable terms, LMS (Learning Management System) and LCMS (Learning Content Management System) platforms share a few functionalities, but couldn’t be more different. A Learning Management System (LMS) is a software application that allows a company, school, or organization to administer, document, track, and report on the delivery of educational courses and training programs. Assigned learning. Individualized learning plan.

The differences between learning in an e-business and learning in a social business

Jane Hart

In my recent webinar I shared a slide that showed the 5 stages of workplace learning. This has attracted a lot of interest, and I’ve been asked to talk more about the differences between “learning” in Stages 1-4 and Stage 5. Working and learning in Stages 1-4 is based upon a Taylorist , industrial age mindset. Similarly e-learning was also about automating traditional training practices. LEARNING IN AN E-BUSINESS. LEARNING IN A SOCIAL BUSINESS. Learning.

Social Learning is NOT a new training trend

Jane Hart

I’ve written a few postings recently (notably Social Learning doesn’t mean what you think it does ) where I have tried to show how the fundamental changes in how businesses are operating, require a fundamental change in how the L&D function needs to view workplace learning. I suggested this means a move from a “Command and Control” approach to an “Encourage and Engage” approach to Workplace Learning. Traditional workplace learning. Workflow audits.

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Supporting the Social Workplace Learning Continuum

Jane Hart

In my previous blog post I explained how I recognized it is difficult for a lot of organisations to support informal and social learning in their organisations, because they are unable to jump the two mindset hurdles of (a) thinking that learning only happens in training courses, and (b) that all organisational learning needs to be controlled by Training/L&D departments. Social learning

Four Ways User-Generated Content (UGC) Can Make its Way into.

Xyleme

Home > Learning Content Management , Social Learning > Four Ways User-Generated Content (UGC) Can Make its Way into Formal Learning Four Ways User-Generated Content (UGC) Can Make its Way into Formal Learning January 20th, 2010 Goto comments Leave a comment This past week, I’ve been reading and referring to Jane Hart’s article The State of Social Learning Today and some Thoughts for the Future of L&D in 2010 quite a bit. Learn more about Dawn here.

5 Phrases to Make Mobile Work

Clark Quinn

We look up product info while shopping, use calculators to split up the bill, we call folks for information in problem-solving like what to bring home from the grocery store, and we take photos of things we need to remember like hotel room numbers or parking spots. Here we’re trying to help our stakeholders (and designers) think beyond the course and think about performance support, informal learning, collaboration, and more.

Quiz: Have you got the New Workplace Learning mindset?

Jane Hart

Following my recent posting, Social learning is not a new training trend , I’ve had a few comments from readers that suggest they were not able to see the difference between the two workplace learning approaches I described – in particular the difference in the “mindset” involved. 1) Do you think that formal learning (ie training, workshops, courses, e-learning) is the only appropriate way that people should learn to do their jobs?

Learning and Development Webinars

Xyleme

The below learning and development webinars feature speakers from leading companies like Cisco, Dell, T-Mobile, Caterpillar, and Baker Hughes, and cover a variety of topics, news, and best practices specifically geared toward learning and development. Building the Plane While Flying It: A Case Study on Rapid Learning Strategy Innovation at Spectrum. Moving from a traditional training strategy to one that embeds learning in the daily workflow is challenging enough.

Five Myths of Social Learning

Xyleme

Home > Social Learning > Five Myths of Social Learning Five Myths of Social Learning December 3rd, 2009 Goto comments Leave a comment There is no question that the rise of social networks is creating a profound shift in the way training departments are delivering knowledge to their employees, partners, and customers. revolution has brought learning networks front and center with “ Connect and Communicate ” becoming the new mantra for training organizations.

Working smarter

Jay Cross

I don’t talk much about training or learning any more. You can train people but they may or may not learn. Learning is better than training, but learning is not enough to make sure the job gets done. Sometimes it’s easier to add smarts to the workflow (performance support) than to stuff things into people’s heads. Moreover, people often fail to put what they learn into practice. It may or may not involve learning. Example: collaboration.

Social Learning doesn’t mean what you think it does!

Jane Hart

Learning and self-expression are exploding. The changes we are seeing in Workplace Learning are of course just one part of the changes we are seeing in businesses as whole. Simply replace the word “business&# in the quote above with the word “learning&# and it still makes sense. So, for instance the first paragraph would now read: “Social Learning ” is not about technology, or about “corporate culture&#. We are interested in good information design.

Time for the Training Department to be Taken Seriously

Xyleme

Today, I’m going to talk about learning content management (ECM) and enterprise content management (LCM). But this blog post isn’t about why learning needs to engage with the enterprise. I’ve already written about this extensively in my Plugging Learning into ECM white paper (also available for download at the resource library section of our web site). Well, for the simple reason that this functionality already exists with best-of-breed vendors outside of learning.

Through the Workscape Looking Glass

Jay Cross

Learning Ecosystem, Learning Ecology, and Learnscape mean the same thing as Workscape. I don’t use the word learn with executives, who inevitably think back to the awfulness of school and close their ears. In the same vein, I talk about Working Smarter instead of informal learning, social learning, and so forth. Some people denigrate informal learning but nobody’s against Working Smarter. However, compliance is not learning.

FAQ 139

why learning and enterprise content management?

Xyleme

Home > ECM , Executive Perspective > Why Learning and Enterprise Content Management? Why Learning and Enterprise Content Management? This has proven to be the right decision as XML has become the de facto standard not only for content portability, but for learning content as well. Unlike our competitors who use proprietary technology to store and manage reusable learning objects, our solution was designed to be portable across content management systems.

Why Learning and Enterprise Content Management?

Xyleme

Home > ECM , Executive Perspective > Why Learning and Enterprise Content Management? Why Learning and Enterprise Content Management? This has proven to be the right decision as XML has become the de facto standard not only for content portability, but for learning content as well. Unlike our competitors who use proprietary technology to store and manage reusable learning objects, our solution was designed to be portable across content management systems.

Open Education, MOOCs, and Opportunities

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

Reusable Learning Resources The initial development of online learning technology began at scale with the development of the learning management system (LMS) in the mid-1990s. These combined learning materials, activities and interaction, and assessments. These defined metadata standards describing small and reusable resources first called ''learning objects'' by AutoDesk''s Wayne Hodgins. In xMOOCs, adaptive learning technology supports instruction.

Top 10 eLearning Predictions 2011 #LCBQ

Tony Karrer

Learning apps. Branon Learning Management System App Stores Bob Little Apps, Not Courses Inge de Waard Augmented reality moves towards augmented learning with easy tools: Wikitude , Layar , ARToolKit. Situated learning (learning within context in a community of practice) grows thanks to augmented mobile reality. Learning Analytics 6. open up exciting opportunities for people to access relevant information where and when they require it.

Workplace Learning Professionals Next Job - Management Consultant

Tony Karrer

The Big Question this month is Workplace Learning in 10 Years : If you peer inside an organization in 10 years time and you look at how workplace learning is being supported by that organization, what will you see? What will the mix of Push vs. Pull Learning; Formal vs. Informal supported by the organization? What new departments will be responsible for parts of workplace learning? Sensing patterns and helping to develop emergent work and learning practices.

Beyond Institutions Personal Learning in a Networked World

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

As Peter said this is part 2 of a trilogy of talks, I gave the first one yesterday at University of Greenwich on the topic of "Open learning and open educational resources". The talk is called "Beyond Institutions Personal Learning in a Networked World" and I want to begin with a story that came across the wires recently and I thought was very appropriate for this venue. Not getting the point that learning today is about play and socializing. Learning is not remembering.

Best articles on Working Smarter, April 2012

Jay Cross

Harvard University has today put into the public domain (CC0) full bibliographic information about virtually all the 12M works in its 73 libraries. Flipping Corporate Learning . Flipping learning is big in education. It will be big in corporate learning. How do you flip learning? Khan Academy is the poster child for flipped learning. Millions of students are learning this way. Kapp’s Gamification for Learning and Instruction .

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Last Year's Predictions For 2008, Reviewed

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

As for e-learning, 2008 was a year in which very little actually occurred(even in gaming, the headline reads Old Standby Back On Top ). Less-democratic processes will lead to a clearer distinction between expert-generated knowledge and the overwhelming quantity of information available everyplace, making it easier to discern information quality. E-learning, knowledge management, corporate communications, and talent management will continue to converge.

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e-Clippings (Learning As Art): Reflecting on the e-Learning Guild Annual Gathering

Mark Oehlert

e-Clippings (Learning As Art) Home Archives Subscribe About My Social Networks « e-Learning Guild Gathering Follow Up Post | Main | Post Conference Clean Up.Social Change, Web 2.0 and design » April 16, 2007 Reflecting on the e-Learning Guild Annual Gathering So Ive done this a bit differently this time. Here then are my collected thoughts (in no particular order) on the 2007 e-Learning Guild Annual Gathering.