Mythless Learning Design

Clark Quinn

If I’m going to rail against myths in learning, it makes sense to be clear about what learning design without myths looks like. Let me lay out a little of what mythless learning design is, or should be. Instead, mythless design starts with focusing on performance. desig

Design 215

Signifying change

Clark Quinn

There is now quite a bit available about signifying change with ritual. In the former, they may be becoming a member of the community, but it’s about changing personal behavior regardless. And, to be clear, here I’m talking secular change.). The other distinction is the scope of the change. Is this a small personal change, or is this a switch to an entire system of belief? If we want to transform people, signifying the change seems important.

Change 123

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Experimenting with conference design

Clark Quinn

And, what’s nice, is that they’re experimenting with conference design, not just moving straight online. And their stated goal is changing the way we conference. Yet also designed so that you can come in late, or early, and drill into what you want when you want. We’re designing this in the time between now and launch. I’m glad that they’re experimenting with conference design. design meta-learning social technology

Packaging change

Clark Quinn

To start, one of my themes for the year is transformation , about deeper learning design. I’ve argued strongly that we need to do deeper learning design before we worry about tarting it up with personalization/adaptation, VR/AR, AI, etc. The eLearning Guild just had a summit, and my learning experience design workshop from Learning Solutions has been again accepted for DevLearn (and I’d welcome seeing you there!).

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Silly Design

Clark Quinn

Time for a brief rant on interface designs. And, hopefully, we can extract some lessons, because these are just silly design decisions. But there’s one very very silly design decision here. It’s a principle called ‘mapping’ (see Don Norman’s essential reading for anyone who designs for people: The Design of Everyday Things ). It used to be straightforward, but they changed it. design

Design 131

AI Technologies Are Fundamentally Changing How Work Gets Done

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

The expanded scope will change the value employers place on tasks, and the types of skills most in demand.”. The data set generated by these methods provides much more detail about the changes in tasks within jobs and in skill requirements than traditional survey data.

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Adapting to change

Clark Quinn

And, of course, that means many things have changed. I thought I’d just overview some of ways I’m adapting to change, so you can keep track and take advantage. I’ll be clear: it’s about ‘thinking’ mobile, which means getting your mind around much much more than ‘courses on a phone’ And it’s about design and strategy, not development. After all, I’ve quipped about the importance of getting the design right.

Change 127

changing structures

Harold Jarche

“For the first time since the industrial revolution, organizations are changing at a fundamental level. The change is very much a work in progress in most organizations. But we now have many examples of organizations that are fully functioning in an entirely new way — that is, new ideas about how the organization is designed, about how work gets done, how people relate to each other.” Changed role of leaders —.

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Designing Ecosystems | A Learning Journey

Dave Snowden

On September 16, 2019, Cognitive Edge was invited to a Research Meeting convened by the Stanford Center for Design Research and the David Ramsey Map Center. The event was convened to integrate perspectives on Innovation Ecosystem and Design Thinking to come together to share insights. .

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Evil design?

Clark Quinn

First, this is bad design. providers of internet and cable from whom you can only get a 1 or 2 year price which will then ramp up and unless you remember to check/change, you’ll end up paying them more than you should until you get around to noticing and doing something about it). The post Evil design? design strategy technologyThis is a rant, but it’s coupled with lessons. .

Design 121

Addressing Changes

Clark Quinn

Yesterday, I listed some of the major changes that L&D needs to acknowledge. As serious practitioners in a potentially valuable field, we need to adapt to the changing environment as much as we need to assist our charges to do so. As a consequence, we need to design solutions that recognize our individual situations, and leverage technology as an augment. So we want to design human/computer system solutions to problems, not just human or system solutions.

Change 119

Redesigning Learning Design

Clark Quinn

Of late, a lot of my work has been designing learning design. Helping orgs transition their existing design processes to ones that will actually have an impact. That is, someone’s got a learning design process, but they want to improve it. One idea, of course, is to replace it with some validated design process. Another approach, much less disruptive, is to find opportunities to fine tune the design. design strategy

Design 117

Sign of a change?

Clark Quinn

We need this change! First, it’s a great design. In short, they did the design. For instance, I have a learning design process audit I offer that’s reasonably priced and will identify wastes and opportunities for the smallest change in your approach for the maximum impact. The post Sign of a change? designI’ve been touting my recent book on debunking learning myths.

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Learning Tools and Uni Change

Clark Quinn

As part of a push for Learning Engineering , Carnegie Mellon University recently released their learning design tools. I don’t completely align with their approach, but that’s ok, and I regularly cite their lead as a person who’s provided sage advice about doing good learning design. First, let’s be fair, most uni learning design isn’t very good. We need faculty and support staff to ‘get’ what good learning design is.

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Learning Design Insights

Clark Quinn

I attended a recent Meetup of the Bay Area Learning Design & Technology, and it led to some insights. I was tapped to host the Learning Design conversation (there were three others: LMS, Measurement, and Social Learning), and that meant that a subset of the group sat in on the discussion. I’d chosen to start with 3 or four questions to prompt discussion: What is good learning design? Are you doing good learning design? design

Design 140

Thoughts on Learning Design Strategy

Clark Quinn

At the DevLearn conference, I ran a Morning Buzz on Learning Design Strategy. I started with a set of questions to address, so I’ll go through their comments in roughly that order (though we didn’t exactly follow this structure): What is learning design strategy? I had in mind the approach taken by an organization to their learning design. What gaps are we seeing in learning design strategy? design strategy

Design, value & constraint

Dave Snowden

In Whistler earlier in the year we looked at the wider question of design and moved on in Tasmania to examine design in the context of resilience. In the final retreat of the year we continue the theme of design but this time with a wider focus on value. This year that theme has been design both as a process but also in the context of resilience and sustainability in society. How can we design systems that allow human systems to grow and flourish?

Design 135

Egoless design

Clark Quinn

A number of years ago I wrote a series on design heuristics that emerged by looking at our cognitive limitations and practices from other field. One of the practices I covered briefly in one of the posts was egoless design, and a recent conversation reminded me of it. The context for this is talking about how to improve our designs. This applies to instructional design as well. One of the things we could, and should do, is design reviews. design social strateg

Design 119

Instructional Design Orthodoxy

Xyleme

I will be dating myself here, but so much of the orthodoxy in the instructional design process was forged back in the late 80’s and early 90’s when the only Computer-Based Training (CBT) tools were Toolbook for the PC, and Hypercard for the Mac. The idea that you might allow scrolling was to many an Instruction Designer taboo. And the trend that was initiated on the tablet is now changing our expectations of how we interact with content in a computer web browser.

Design 208

Levels of Design

Clark Quinn

Kirkpatrick is widely (not widely enough, and wrongly) used as an evaluation tool, but he talked about using it as a design tool, and that perspective made clear for me a problem with our approaches. The point, and this is emphasized by the ‘design’ perspective, is that you are supposed to start with level 4, and work back. And how do we change that behavior (Level 2)? Using it as a design tool, however, would emphasize the point. design strategy

Design 139

The Evolution of Design Thinking

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Design Thinking is the featured topic in the September issue of the Harvard Business Review with four articles on the subject. “It’s Executives are using this approach to devise strategy and manage change,” reads the tagline in its cover. The application of design thinking beyond products, - in innovation, problem solving and business strategy, - isn’t new. IDEO , a firm best known for pioneering this expanded view of design, traces its roots back to 1978.

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Designing outside your comfort zone

Adaptive Path

That’s what we tell ourselves because as designers we often rely on tried and tested tools, methods and standards to help us arrive at a solution that should work. There is good reason why we learned these things in design school –they help us work efficiently, they minimize risk and they help us consider the world views of and design for people other than ourselves. They may sound like best practices for just being a good designer, and they are. “Trust the process!”.

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Ch-ch-ch-changes

Clark Quinn

Is there an appetite for change in L&D? There really isn’t any burning desire for change, or willingness to move even if there is. If L&D realized it was about supporting the broad spectrum of learning, including self-learning, and social learning, and research and problem-solving and trouble-shooting and design and all the other situations where you don’t know the answer when you start, the possibilities are huge.

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Measuring Culture Change

Clark Quinn

Someone recently asked how you would go about measuring culture change, and I thought it’s an interesting question. So it’s plausible that you’d want to change, and if you do, you’d like to know how it’s going. In this case, I mean the broad sense of learning: problems solved, new designs generated, research answering questions. As a process, I think about what I might do before, during, and after any culture change initiative.

Is Design Thinking the “New Liberal Arts”?

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Design thinking has become an increasingly popular topic of discussion over the past decade. Design is no longer just for physical objects, e.g. cars, bridges, shoes, jewelry, smartphones. Design thinking is now being applied to abstract entities, - e.g. systems, services, information and organizations, - as well as to devise strategies, manage change and solve complex problems. The application of design thinking beyond products isn’t new.

Design 215

From instructor to designer & facilitator

Clark Quinn

Someone on Quora asked me about the instructor role: How would the role of a teacher change in this modern online learning world? While I posted an answer there, I thought I’d post it here too: I see two major roles in that of the ‘teacher’: the designer of learning experiences (pre), and the facilitator of same (during/post). I think the design changes by returning to natural learning approaches, an apprenticeship model (c.f.

Design 113

Grand Unified Theory of Service Design, Systems Design, and Organization Design

Adaptive Path

I sat down with Jeff to pick his brain on putting the ‘service design’ in software-as-a-service. One is that I specialize in helping IT organizations and digital businesses bring together agile, DevOps, and design thinking in order to adopt new methodologies and be able to deliver more continuous value, so I’m really interested in the relationship between design and engineering and design and IT in particular. Very often, DevOps and design never speak.

Design 149

Creating an architecture for change

Dave Snowden

So we use military or economic force to remove said delete, now that hasn’t worked … we need to focus on creating an infrastructure within which a fluid series of changes over time can create a resilient society build around local networked agency. This is not only government it is also the way of all legitimate organisational change. Changing the constraints to allow the emergence of contextually appropriate practice within a locale.

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Automation and the Changing Demand for Workforce Skills

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Let me now discuss the more recent report published earlier this year, which examined the changes in skills required of human workers over the next 10-15 years. To do so, the study analyzed how the total number of hours worked in 25 different skill areas has changed between 2002 and 2016 and estimated the expected change in hours worked by 2030. I’ll focus my discussion on the US skill changes, as the European changes were similar.

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Nothing Has Changed. Everything Has Changed.

Charles Jennings

We know that the results of learning and development activities can only be determined by changes in behaviour (after all, at its heart that’s what ‘real learning’ is) and behaviour change needs to be measured in terms of what individuals, teams and organisations can do and are doing, that they couldn’t do previously, or what they’re doing better than before. But we need wider fundamental changes if we’re to do so at speed and scale. So, what are these fundamental changes?

Change 183

Evil Design

Clark Quinn

In the mobile ideation session I ran today for some folks, the question came up about good and bad examples of design, and subsequent events reminded me of the topic of not just bad, but evil design. What I mean is design that is crafted to return maximal outcome to the designer, not just at the expense of the user, but even to the discomfort of the user or contrary to their intentions. This seems designed for the sheer purpose to get more fees. design

Design 121

change the system, not the leader

Harold Jarche

Plus ça change, plus c’est pareil. Even punishing the person in charge will change little. Changing leaders will not change the system from which they emerged. To remain connected to the changes in their networks, good leaders are curious and promote experimentation, but do not need to control it. Leadership in networks is helping the network make better decisions, and this requires a focus on the best organizational design to meet the changing situations.

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The Internet of Things is Changing the World

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

“How the world will change as computers spread into everyday objects,” is the title of the lead article in a comprehensive review of the Internet of Things (IoT) in a r ecent issue of The Economist. As the world’s digital and physical infrastructures converge, digital technologies are being designed right into all kinds of consumer and industrial products.

Change 137

Jay Changes Direction

Jay Cross

Designed the first business curriculum for what became the University of Phoenix, the largest business school in the world. Learned every aspect of the training business, from marketing to design to models to costs, from ISA to ISPI. I want to empower workers to be intuitive instructional designers as well as self-directed learners by sharing what we know. My book Aha!

Change 133

Design Thinking and the Workplace Experience

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Design has long played a major role in product innovation. But in the last few years, a shift has been underway bringing design to the very core of the business. “ The Evolution of Design Thinking : It’s no longer just for products. Executives are using this approach to devise strategy and manage change,” read the cover of the Harvard Business Review’s September issue , which featured several articles on the subject. .

Design 213

Quip: design

Clark Quinn

If you get the design right, there are lots of ways to implement it; if you don’t get the design right, it doesn’t matter how you implement it. Too often, people under design and overproduce, resulting in great looking products that are worthless. Similarly, I’ve found that if you get the design right, you don’t need lots of production. And the tools will change, but the need for quality design won’t. design

Design 119

About this change to the site…

Clark Quinn

It had some problems, but I was afraid to change it because of the repercussions. A little background… My ISP, a good friend, colleague, and mentor, was making some changes to how my sites are implemented. It made sense, because if anyone could get access to my admin code, they could not only change the look and feel (easy to fix), they could alter the code and put in malicious stuff. Suddenly, it’s easy to change the site, without coding!

Change 147

Changing thinking, changing systems

Harold Jarche

“The challenge of the coming century is to change the value system of society. Working smarter draws upon ideas from design thinking, network optimization, brain science, user experience design, learning theory, organizational development, social business, technology, collaboration, web 2.0 Tweet Here are some of the insights and observations that were shared on Twitter this past week. Vaclav Havel” via @BillMcKibben. “Intellectual property is an oxymoron.

Change 144

Evidence-based Design

Clark Quinn

In my last post , I asserted that we need evidence-based design for what we do. There are several good books out (and I believer that there is at least one more on the way) that summarize the implications of research design. Julie Dirksen’s Design for How People Learn is another good one. Michael Allen’s work on design is also recommended, e.g. Guide to eLearning. A number of people run workshops on deeper design. design

Design 129

Transcending Experience Design

Clark Quinn

Last week’s #lrnchat touched on an important topic, experience design. The one I want to pursue here is the notion of transformative experience design. They argued that what was due next was a ‘transformation economy’, where people paid for experiences that change them (in ways that they desire or value). There are things about experience design that instructional design largely ignores: emotion, multiple senses, extended engagement. design

Design 137

A Design Approach to Human Flourishing

Adaptive Path

Anna Pohlmeyer is assistant professor in the Department of Industrial Design at TU Delft where she also co-chairs the Delft Institute of Positive Design, a research institute devoted to the study of design for human flourishing. I talked with Anna and asked her to tell us about positive design and how designers might incorporate it into their work. Anna spoke about positive design at the Adaptive Path UX Week 2014 conference in San Francisco.

Design 216

Birgit Mager and the Evolution of Service Design

Adaptive Path

Birgit Mager has watched service design evolve since the mid-nineties, and has been hugely influential in its development. She holds the first service design professorship at the University of Applied Sciences, Cologne, Germany, is the President and Co-Founder of the International Service Design Network , and Editor-in-Chief of Touchpoint , the International Journal of Service Design. Ayla Newhouse [AN]: How did you arrive at service design as your path?

Design 219

Yes, you do have to change

Clark Quinn

And that’s assuming courses are all the learning unit should be doing, but increasingly we recognize that that’s only a small proportion of what makes important business outcomes, and increasingly we’re recognizing that the role needs to move from instructional designer to performance consultant. More worrisome is that it can let designers off the hook in terms of thinking deeper. The industry is going to have to change. design strategy

Change 195