Clark Quinn

Microdesign

Clark Quinn

This came up again in a recent conversation, and I had a further thought (which of course I have to blog about ;).

FocusOn Learning reflections

Clark Quinn

If you follow this blog (and you should :), it was pretty obvious that I was at the FocusOn Learning conference in San Diego last week (previous 2 posts were mindmaps of the keynotes). And it was fun as always. Here are my reflections on what happened a bit more, as an exercise in meta-learning. There were three themes to the conference: mobile, games, and video.

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What’s Your Learning Tool Stack?

Clark Quinn

For me, it’s Word for writing, OmniGraffle for diagramming (as this one was created in), WordPress for this blog (my thinking out loud; it is for me, at least in the first instance), and a suite of note taking software (depending on type of notes) and personal productivity.

Tools 89

How to learn and learn-to-learn

Clark Quinn

I naturally decided to answer in a blog post ;). I was asked by a colleague to answer some questions for a project on how to learn. In your working life, how have you learnt effectively from experience, please provide an example if possible?

Evil design?

Clark Quinn

We now return you to our regularly scheduled blog topics. This is a rant, but it’s coupled with lessons. . I’ve been away, and one side effect was a lack of internet bandwidth at the residence. In the first day I’d used up a fifth of the allocation for the whole time (> 5 days)! So, I determined to do all I could to cut my internet usage while away from the office.

Diagramming

Clark Quinn

So, for instance, I blogged about a representation of social process. So yesterday I talked about the value of diagrams , but I thought I’d add a bit about the process of actually creating diagrams. Naturally, I created a diagram about it.

Top 10 Tools for @C4LPT 2017

Clark Quinn

WordPress is my blogging tool (what I’m using here), and serves both as a thinking tool (if I write it out, it forces me to process it), but it’s also a share tool (obviously). Jane Hart is running her annual Top 100 Tools for Learning poll (you can vote too), and here’s my contribution for this year.

Top 10 Tools for Learning 2016

Clark Quinn

WordPress is my blogging tool (where you’re at right now), and it’s a way I think ‘out loud’ and the feedback I get is a wonderful way to learn. It’s that time again: Jane Hart is running her 2016 (and 10th!) Top 100 Tools for Learning poll. It’s a valuable service, and points out some interesting things and it’s interesting to see the changes over time. It’s also a way to see what others are using and maybe find some new ideas.

Tools 69

Why Work Out Loud? (for #wolweek)

Clark Quinn

You can blog your thoughts, microblog what you’re looking at, make your interim representations available as collaborative documents, there are many ways to make your work transparent. This blog, Learnlets, is just for that purpose of thinking out loud: so I can get feedback and input or others can benefit. Yeah, there are risks (I have seen my blog purloined without attribution), but the benefits outweigh the risks. Why should one work out loud (aka Show Your Work )?

Metacognitive Activity?

Clark Quinn

If you choose to use a different media (perhaps it’s relative, like when I created an animation after blogging for > 10 years ;), we might know. So, as another outcome of the xAPI base camp a few weeks back, I was wondering about tracking not only learning , but meta-learning.

Social Media Policy?

Clark Quinn

And, of course, this is my blog, for deeper reflections. I believe that if you find someone interesting, and follow both their blogs and their tweets, you can see what they’re tracking and then their reflections, and use them as a mentor. And I use IFTTT to send blog announcements to Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn. So what’s your social media policy? It’s not something you should do lightly, or haphazardly, it seems to me.

eLearning Process Survey results!

Clark Quinn

Some caveats: it’s self-selected, it’s limited (23 respondents), and it’s arguably readers of this blog or the other folks who pointed to it, so it’s a select group.

Pick my brain?

Clark Quinn

Sure, you can read my blog or books, but sometimes you may want assistance in contextualizing it to your situation. It’s a continual bane of a consultant’s existence that there are people who want to ‘pick your brain’ It’s really asking for free consulting, and as such, it’s insulting. If you google the phrase, you’ll see how many people have indicated their problems with this!

2015 top 10 tools for learning

Clark Quinn

WordPress: my blogging tool, that provides regular reflection opportunities for me in generating them, and from the feedback others provide via comments. Jane Hart has been widely and wisely known for her top 100 Tools for Learning (you too can register your vote ). As a public service announcement, I list my top 10 tools for learning as well: Google search: I regularly look up things I hear of and don’t know.

Tools 70

Innovation Thoughts

Clark Quinn

And I promised to write a blog post about it, and I’ve finally received the list of thoughts, so here are my reflections. As an aside, I’ve written separate articles on L&D innovation recently for both CLO magazine and the Litmos blog so you can check those out, too.

Why models matter

Clark Quinn

I recognize that I talk a lot in concepts, e.g. these blog posts and diagrams, but there’s a principled reason: I’m trying to give you a flexible basis, models, to apply to your own situation. In the industrial age, you really didn’t need to understand why you were doing what you were doing, you were just supposed to do it. At the management level, you supervised behavior, but you didn’t really set strategy.

Quinn-Thalheimer: Tools, ADDIE, and Limitations on Design

Clark Quinn

A few months back, the esteemed Dr. Will Thalheimer encouraged me to join him in a blog dialog, and we posted the first one on who L&D had responsibility to. And while we took the content seriously, I can’t say our approach was similarly. We decided to continue, and here’s the second in the series, this time trying to look at what might be hindering the opportunity for design to get better.

Measurement?

Clark Quinn

First, if you haven’t seen it, you should check out the debate I had with the good Dr. Will Thalheimer over at his blog about the Kirkpatrick model. Sorry for the lack of posts this week; Monday was shot while I migrated my old machine to a new one (yay)! Tuesday was shot with catching up. Wed was shot with lost internet, and trying to migrate the lad to my old machine. So today I realize I haven’t posted all week (though you got extra from me last week ;)!

A Nurturing Culture #blimage

Clark Quinn

She presented the following image and our task is to blog about it: So my take is how things grow in a nurturing environment. So there’s my blog on the image. My colleague Jane Hart dobbed me (and several other colleagues) in for the #blimage challenge.

Starting from the end

Clark Quinn

And the impact is what the Kirkpatrick model properly is about, as I opined in the blog debate. The blog post is the short version, but I also wrote this rather longer and more rigorous paper (PDF), and I’m inclined think it’s one of my more important contributions to design (to date ;). Week before last, Will Thalheimer and I had another one of our ‘debates’, this time on the Kirkpatrick model (read the comments, too!).

Meta-learn what?

Clark Quinn

I’ve talked about ‘stealth mentoring’, where you can follow someone’s tweets and blog posts, and they can serve as a mentor for you without even knowing it! If, indeed, learning is the new business imperative , what does that mean we need to learn? What are the skills that we want to have, or need to develop? I reckon they fall into two categories; those we do for our own learning, and those for learning with and through others.

Reflecting practice

Clark Quinn

blog or podcast or…). my goal is 2 blog posts per week). Someone opined on yesterday’s post that it’s hard to find time for reflection, and I agree it’s hard. You need to find ways to make it systematic, as it’s hard to make persistent change. So I responded with three personal suggestions, and thought I’d share them here, and also think about what the organizational response could be. Individual.

Reconciling Formal and Informal

Clark Quinn

Having requirements for personal reflections via a blog, discussions via forums, and collaborative assignments via wikis, and more, to facilitate learning are all good things, but certainly from the view of the performer it is not informal.

Sharing pointedly or broadly

Clark Quinn

The limitations mean that more lengthy discussions typically are conveyed via… Formats supporting unlimited text, including thoughtful reflections, updates on thinking, and more tend to be conveyed via email or blog posts. A blog post (like this), on the other hand, is open for anyone on the ‘system’ The same holds true for other media files besides text.

The Polymath Proposition

Clark Quinn

We now return you to your regularly scheduled blog already in progress… meta-learning strategyAt the recent DevLearn conference, one of the keynotes was Adam Savage. And he said something that gave me a sense of validation. He was talking about being a polymath, and I think that’s worth understanding. His point was that his broad knowledge of a lot of things was valuable.

Personal Mobile Mastery

Clark Quinn

Of course, you can snap pictures or films for later recollection and reflection, and contribute them to a blog post for reflection. A conversation with a colleague prompted a reflection. The topic was personal learning, and in looking for my intersections (beyond my love of meta-learning ), I looked at my books. The Revolution isn’t an obvious match, nor is games (though trust me, I could make them work ;), but a more obvious match was mlearning.

Top 10 Tools for Learning

Clark Quinn

WordPress: the other way I write out loud is on my blog (like this), and my blog is powered by WordPress. Jane Hart compiles, every year, a list of the top 10 tools for learning. And, of course, it’s that time again, so here we go. I like what Harold Jarche did about tagging his list with the steps of his Seek-Sense-Share model for Personal Knowledge Mastery , so I’m adding that as well. In no particular order: 1. Word: I write most of my articles and books in Word.

Tools 51

Useful cognitive overhead

Clark Quinn

As I’ve reported before , I started mind mapping keynotes not as a function of filling the blog, but for listening better. You’ve seen them here in my blog (or will if you browse around a bit), and in my presentations. That is, without the extra processing requirement of processing the talk into a structure, my mind was (too) free to go wandering. I only posted it because I thought I should do something with it!

My thoughts on tech and training

Clark Quinn

Again, the full thoughts can be found on their blog. The eLearning Guild, in queuing up interest in their Learning Solutions/Performance Ecosystem conference, asked for some thoughts on the role of technology and training. And, of course, I obliged. You can see them here. In short, I said that technology can augment what we already do, serving to fill in gaps between what we desired and what we could deliver, and it also gave us some transformative capabilities.

The 3 Social Media Things You Ought to Avoid

Clark Quinn

As context, because of this blog, I get occasional emails offering to write guest posts for me. Don’t offer guest posts that don’t match the tenor of the blog. At least, that is, with me. Frankly, I wonder if you even bothered to read this after a title like that! Or at least are highly suspicious at this point. It (should) be just the type of thing you would not expect from me. And there’s a reason for that.

Site Learnings

Clark Quinn

This is my blog, after all! I’d put it in, and then my ISP changed the settings on my blog so I couldn’t use the built-in editor to edit the header and footer of the site pages (for security). Though, in the process of changing my url style for my blog, it is now generating 404 errors on pages that use the old mechanism (it seemed to work okay on some newer ones, but apparently is falling apart on some older ones).

10 years!?!?

Clark Quinn

A comment on my earliest blog post (thanks, Henrik), made me realize that this post will mark 10 years of blogging. Obviously I’ve avoided the offers to exchange links or blog posts that include links for SEO stuff, but I’ve even, rightly or wrongly, not allowed ads. Yes, my first post came out on January 14th, 2006. This will be my 1,200th post (I forced one in yesterday to be the 1199th so I could say that ;), yow!

Social Learning, Strategically

Clark Quinn

To empower workers, you want to have the tools for communication, e.g. video sharing, blogging micro- and macro-, discussion forums, etc as well as the tools for collaboration, e.g. shared documents and expertise finding, arranged around tasks and interests, not around silos. Increasingly, as I look around, I see folks addressing learning technology tactics; they’ll make a mobile app, they’ll try out a simulation game, they’ll put in a portal.

Learning Design isn’t for the wimpy

Clark Quinn

I’ve had my head down on a major project, a bunch of upcoming speaking engagements, some writing I’ve agreed to do, and…(hence the relative paucity of blog posts). That project, however, has been interesting for a variety of reasons, and one really is worth sharing: ID isn’t easy. We’ve been given some content, and it’s not just about being good little IDs and taking what they give us and designing instruction from it.

Reflections on Experience

Clark Quinn

<Clark Quinn> <wrote> <a blog post>), systems can generate records across a wide variety of activity, creating a rich base of data to mine for contingencies that lead to success. The API previous known as Tin Can provides a consistent way to report individual activity. With the simple syntax of <who> <did> <this> (e.g. <Clark

Reimagining Learning

Clark Quinn

communing on blog posts, participating in a discussion forum, etc). On the way to the recent Up To All Of Us un conference (#utaou), I hadn’t planned an agenda.

Other writings

Clark Quinn

My blog posts are pretty regular (my aim is 2/week), but tend to have ideas that are embryonic or a bit ‘evangelical’ First, I’ve written four books; you can check them out and get sample chapters at their respective sites: Engaging Learning: Designing e-Learning Simulation Games. These tend to be aggregated thoughts that are longer than a blog post, but not as through as a chapter.

Building Stronger Organizations

Clark Quinn

A recent Ross Dawson blog post included a mention of building flexibility: “the more flexible the organization, the more able it is to succeed&#. Which reminded me of some work I assisted Eileen Clegg with on extremophiles that we wrote up for Marcia Conner & James Clawson’s book, Creating a Learning Culture.

Reflecting socially

Clark Quinn

So, blogging is one way of sharing your thoughts and getting feedback (as I do here). If teams share their collective thinking (blogs again, or perhaps wikis), they can get feedback not just from each other but also from non-team individuals. About ten years ago, now, Jay Cross and I met and with some other colleagues, started what we called the Meta-Learning Lab.

Quip: conversations

Clark Quinn

Blogging lets you put out more formed thoughts and look for feedback. Conversations are the engine of business. Seriously. How many problems are solved by saying “go talk to <so-and-so>&# , or ideas sparked by conversations around the water cooler? How many times has a chance conversation ended up leading to a new product, service, acquisition, or more? The conversations can be of many types: with co-workers, managers, subordinates, customers, stakeholders.