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Leadership emerges from network culture

Harold Jarche

Employers wanted to keep workers on-site, when it made no sense, as this post from 2005 noted: virtual work, but we need you onsite. A new culture emerges. Culture is an emergent property of people working together.

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: From Push to Pull

John Hagel

Read More] Tracked on November 03, 2005 at 01:14 PM Comments Prima di allora, infatti, i prenderlo in amministratori erano vitali capricciosi maschere tolta e a filone condizioni [b]giochi carte[/b] potuto falli per gradualmente titolo.

stevenberlinjohnson.com: 2005, In Brief

Steven Berlin Johnson

stevenberlinjohnson.com « | Main | » 2005, In Brief Happy new year, you crazy kids. How was your 2005, all told? Everything Bad Is Good for You: How Todays Popular Culture Is Actually Making Us Smarter The title says it all.

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: The World Is Spiky

John Hagel

Tom in his best-selling new book says “The World Is Flat” and Richard in a new article in the October 2005 issue of Atlantic Monthly asserts “The World Is Spiky" Richard’s article is a great read (supported by highly visual maps) and I highly recommend it.

stevenberlinjohnson.com: Delicious

Steven Berlin Johnson

December 09, 2005 in Web | Permalink Comments > I should have added the inevitable next stage > in this process: the mixed feelings of > regret, envy, and excitement among their > followers when they sell out to the Man.

stevenberlinjohnson.com:

Steven Berlin Johnson

December 20, 2005 in Cities | Permalink Comments Are there enough traffic cams (in NY or anywhere else) for this idea to be feasible? December 25, 2005 at 07:54 AM [link] - [link] - [link] - [link] Posted by: france | April 02, 2007 at 01:38 AM The comments to this entry are closed.

stevenberlinjohnson.com:

Steven Berlin Johnson

December 14, 2005 in Web | Permalink Comments You can't trust anything. " Posted by: Bob Hawkins | December 14, 2005 at 12:26 PM While interesting as a benchmark, for my daily life, the Encyclopedia Britannica is irrelevant.

stevenberlinjohnson.com:

Steven Berlin Johnson

December 11, 2005 in Cities | Permalink Comments There's a reason those New Englanders are alarmingly friendly. Posted by: Bob | December 12, 2005 at 09:12 AM [link] - [link] - [link] - [link] Posted by: france | April 02, 2007 at 01:33 AM The comments to this entry are closed.

stevenberlinjohnson.com: Meet The New Blog

Steven Berlin Johnson

November 30, 2005 | Permalink Comments re: fixing the urls, try this link: [link] Essentially, you'll use an MT template to generate an.htaccess file to redirect the links. Posted by: Matt | November 30, 2005 at 09:03 PM I like it Steven.

stevenberlinjohnson.com:

Steven Berlin Johnson

November 30, 2005 in Brains | Permalink Comments I think this new style is fantastic. Posted by: risser | December 05, 2005 at 04:57 AM By the way, I had no idea, as your self-blurb suggests, that your four books are also residing in Park Slope.

stevenberlinjohnson.com:

Steven Berlin Johnson

December 15, 2005 in Politics | Permalink Comments Oh man, this was my fear. Everything Bad Is Good for You: How Todays Popular Culture Is Actually Making Us Smarter The title says it all. Interface Culture : How New Technology Transforms the Way We Create and Communicate My first.

stevenberlinjohnson.com: Alexa (and Amazon) Let It All Hang Out

Steven Berlin Johnson

December 13, 2005 in Web | Permalink Comments I'm not sure how this is much different from Google's Search API. link] Posted by: Faiser | December 14, 2005 at 07:23 PM The comments to this entry are closed.

stevenberlinjohnson.com: Hong Kong In Motion

Steven Berlin Johnson

December 12, 2005 in Cities | Permalink Comments Nicely done. fwiw, I did something similar a few years ago on a drive cross-country: [link] Posted by: Alex Wright | December 13, 2005 at 10:22 AM that link to the video clip ( [link] didn't work.

stevenberlinjohnson.com:

Steven Berlin Johnson

December 08, 2005 in Politics | Permalink Comments I came across these a while ago, and was utterly fascinated. Posted by: Stian Haklev | December 08, 2005 at 11:02 AM [link] - [link] - [link] - [link] Posted by: france | April 02, 2007 at 01:37 AM The comments to this entry are closed.

stevenberlinjohnson.com: Vertical Ascent

Steven Berlin Johnson

December 07, 2005 in Cities | Permalink Comments I remember staying at the infamous Chungking mansions in Hong Kong - a huge high-rise with one or two back packer hostels on each floor. Posted by: Stian Haklev | December 08, 2005 at 10:36 AM The comments to this entry are closed.

stevenberlinjohnson.com: Literary Darwinism

Steven Berlin Johnson

But I think the more interesting application would be to shine the light in the other direction: if we know something about human universals from the sciences, then we can use that knowledge to gain a better appreciation of the achievements of culture.

stevenberlinjohnson.com:

Steven Berlin Johnson

Dispelling the Myth of Readership Decline November 30, 2005 in Web | Permalink Comments Well, it seems to me that the profitability of newspapers has historically come from monopoly pricing on local advertising.

stevenberlinjohnson.com:

Steven Berlin Johnson

December 19, 2005 in Cities | Permalink Comments The comments to this entry are closed. Everything Bad Is Good for You: How Todays Popular Culture Is Actually Making Us Smarter The title says it all.

stevenberlinjohnson.com: Ode To Brooklyn

Steven Berlin Johnson

The density is better, the sidewalk culture is better, the greenery is better, the traffic is better. NYO - Observatory December 02, 2005 in Cities | Permalink Comments The comments to this entry are closed.

stevenberlinjohnson.com: Air Purifiers For Data Smog

Steven Berlin Johnson

November 03, 2005 in Articles , Interface | Permalink Comments The system you propose works for 'uninvited' or unwanted interruptions, e.g. incoming e-mail. the informations come better Posted by: Silvia | November 14, 2005 at 09:38 AM The comments to this entry are closed.

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: Ready for Web 3.0?

John Hagel

One significant barrier delaying deployment of these technologies is the cultural gap separating many of the early pioneers of Web 2.0 Posted by: vinnie mirchandani | December 20, 2005 at 06:59 PM Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by: | This is only a preview.

stevenberlinjohnson.com: The Huddled Masses

Steven Berlin Johnson

December 07, 2005 in Cities | Permalink Comments The comments to this entry are closed. Everything Bad Is Good for You: How Todays Popular Culture Is Actually Making Us Smarter The title says it all.

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: Bra Blowback

John Hagel

But the temptation to turn to regulation is especially pronounced on the edge – whether it is the edge of industries, regional economies, cultures or technologies. Posted by: Colin | November 13, 2005 at 04:55 PM Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by: | This is only a preview.

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: Dubai - Global Talent Magnet

John Hagel

Posted by John Hagel on December 11, 2005 | Permalink TrackBack TrackBack URL for this entry: [link] Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Dubai - Global Talent Magnet : Comments I live and work in Dubai and see the good and the bad.

Is Design Thinking the “New Liberal Arts”?

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

I first learned about design thinking during a 2005 visit to the Olin College of Engineering. Complex Systems Education and Talent Innovation Management and Leadership Society and Culture Technology and Strategy

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: Onshore Manufacturing

John Hagel

in the September 4, 2005 issue of the New York Times. Posted by John Hagel on September 06, 2005 | Permalink TrackBack TrackBack URL for this entry: [link] Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Onshore Manufacturing : Comments John, I also found this post informative.

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: Patterns of Business Innovation in China and India

John Hagel

These companies rarely receive much attention from the Western press, in part because they have developed a culture of keeping a low profile. They have stories of losing parents in the Cultural Revolution or migrating from the rural interior and leaving family behind.

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: Offshore Labor Markets

John Hagel

Posted by John Hagel on June 18, 2005 | Permalink TrackBack TrackBack URL for this entry: [link] Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Offshore Labor Markets : Comments Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by: | This is only a preview.

Why Are We Stuck in a World of Slow Economic Growth? Nobody Seems to Know

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Between 1960 and 2005, the global labor force grew at an average of 1.8 percent per year, but since 2005, the rate has downshifted to just 1.1 percent from 1960 to 2005 - and is already shrinking in some countries, such as China and Germany.

stevenberlinjohnson.com:

Steven Berlin Johnson

stevenberlinjohnson.com « The Strike | Main | 2005, In Brief » Nerve is running a the transcript of a long, enjoyable conversation I had a few months ago, with my old friend Rufus Griscom, who co-founded Nerve many moons ago and who has brilliantly kept it alive and thriving through all the dot.com madness. December 24, 2005 in Games | Permalink Comments I have insider information that the SBJ diet include vast quantities of a food-like product called Pringels.

Trust and the On-Demand Economy

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

As this 2005 IBM study noted: “The nature of competition - increasingly intense, global and unpredictable - requires strength across the board.

stevenberlinjohnson.com:

Steven Berlin Johnson

December 18, 2005 in Interface | Permalink Comments Crazy, mine broke earlier this week and I was also debilitated. Posted by: Matt | December 18, 2005 at 09:35 PM Ever hop on a Mac without Expose enabled? Posted by: fengypants | December 18, 2005 at 11:30 PM Steve - mine stops working occassionally too, and then randomly starts working again. Posted by: yellowhandman | December 20, 2005 at 05:40 AM Hold it upside down and spin the wheel like crazy in different directions.

stevenberlinjohnson.com:

Steven Berlin Johnson

December 16, 2005 in Television | Permalink Comments Yes! In any case, perhaps what's lacking in pop culture right now is a phrase to describe the turning point at which it becomes strikingly clear that a once-hip entity has becomes unhip. Faiser Posted by: Faiser | December 17, 2005 at 03:25 AM "Jumping the shark" is so last year. Posted by: jon | December 19, 2005 at 04:41 PM Actually, it sounded like the President had at least three.

stevenberlinjohnson.com: Hong Kong Advice

Steven Berlin Johnson

December 02, 2005 in Meta | Permalink Comments Hi, Steven, it's been a long time. :-) This is probably not all that original, but you definitely want to go to Lan Kwai Fong in the Central District. It's the only place in the world besides Italy that qualifies as a total food culture. Posted by: Gary Chapman | December 02, 2005 at 02:40 PM I'll second the Macau nomination. Interface Culture : How New Technology Transforms the Way We Create and Communicate My first.

stevenberlinjohnson.com: The Strike

Steven Berlin Johnson

December 21, 2005 in Cities | Permalink Comments DOES IT MATTER TO YOU that the Observer may be presenting a skewed and deliberately manipulative view of things and that drawing on tired yet evocative themes like the "less affluent" is a patronising device they may be using to make "more affluent but basically well meaning" readers like you fall for simplistic positions? Posted by: roseg | December 22, 2005 at 03:42 AM What the above poster said.

stevenberlinjohnson.com: Permanent Galleria

Steven Berlin Johnson

December 05, 2005 in Cities | Permalink Comments just wondering : have you ever visited singapore? Posted by: yellowhandman | December 06, 2005 at 07:38 AM I went to Singapore before I went to Hong Kong, and I found the two cities comparable in this particular feature -- their malls, in the way that Steven describes them. Posted by: Gary Chapman | December 06, 2005 at 03:55 PM In Toronto the Eatons Center acts as a respite from the cold weather.

stevenberlinjohnson.com: Hong Kong Rising

Steven Berlin Johnson

December 04, 2005 in Cities | Permalink Comments I have had exactly this experience when have picked up relatives (first-time visitors to the US) from India at JFK in New York. " Posted by: Rangachari Anand | December 05, 2005 at 08:15 AM I happened across a Discovery Channel presentation on the construction of Hong Kong airport, the bridge, subway system -- was fascinating, worth setting up for a recording if it shows again.

stevenberlinjohnson.com: In Which The Blogger Returns To The Academy

Steven Berlin Johnson

October 11, 2005 in Personal | Permalink Comments Congratulations on the appointment at NYU. Posted by: Anthony | October 11, 2005 at 01:09 AM Scary. Posted by: Chris | October 11, 2005 at 03:34 AM Oh, excellent. Posted by: Emily Jenkins | October 11, 2005 at 07:43 AM Congratualations! Posted by: matt | October 11, 2005 at 11:01 AM Welcome to academia! Posted by: Laura Z | October 11, 2005 at 12:41 PM Fabulous, Steven!

stevenberlinjohnson.com: Apple On Demand

Steven Berlin Johnson

October 12, 2005 in Web | Permalink Comments Yeah-- it was quite a day for Apple. Posted by: marc | October 12, 2005 at 07:24 AM I'll be ponying up my $1.99 Posted by: Kyle | October 12, 2005 at 10:26 AM The Apple Remote feels like a result of Apple struggling for years with a one-button mouse and the constraints it generates for software designers. Peter Posted by: risser | October 13, 2005 at 02:45 AM Risser I don't think you're paying for the content.

stevenberlinjohnson.com: The Battle Of The Books

Steven Berlin Johnson

November 19, 2005 in Web | Permalink Comments You ask: "But if the value of searching comes from querying the whole work, not reading it, aren't we really talking about something different?" Posted by: Felix | November 19, 2005 at 12:16 PM Imagine Google hired 10 million people, and assigned each one a single book to read. Posted by: ginsu | November 20, 2005 at 10:14 AM Some excellent thoughts here, but a quick reply to ognjen's post.