Clark Quinn

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Kaihan Krippendorff Keynote Mindmap

Clark Quinn

strategy

Organizational Learning Engineering

Clark Quinn

We see practices that don’t make sense, and we’re not aligned with what we now know about how we think, work, and learn. Let’s go!

‘Cooking up’ some learning

Clark Quinn

So, I like to cook (not bake, but cook). With some extra across the top. One of the ongoing barriers, however, was the rolling. Your thoughts?

Learning Through the Wild

Clark Quinn

So last week I was in the wilderness for some more time, this time with family. And there were several learnings as an outcome that are worth sharing.

What’s Your Learning Tool Stack?

Clark Quinn

I woke up this morning thinking about the tools we use at various levels. Yeah, my life is exciting ;). Or, of course, the ones others use in your org.

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Wild thinking

Clark Quinn

Our everyday lives are decreasingly connected to nature. We’re increasingly separated from the context we evolved in. Is that a good thing?

Augmenting AR for Learning

Clark Quinn

We’re hearing more and more about AR (Augmented Reality), and one of it’s core elements is layering information on top of the world. But in a conversation the other night, it occurred to me that we could push that information to be even more proactive in facilitating learning. And this comes from the use of models. design technology

xAPI conceptualized

Clark Quinn

A couple of weeks ago, I had the pleasure of attending the xAPI Base Camp, to present on content strategy. And, of course, I had to take a stab at it.

The Inaugural Jay Cross Memorial Award winner is…

Clark Quinn

Recipients champion workplace and social learning practices inside their organisation and/or on the wider stage. It’s wider than that. social strateg

‘Form’ing learning

Clark Quinn

Last week I ran a workshop for an online university that is working to improve it’s learning design. Substantially. They’re ramping up their staff abilities, and we’d talked about how I could help. They have ‘content’, but wanted to improve the learning design around this. Then we moved on to more hands-on work. desig

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Learning in context

Clark Quinn

Naturally, I had to diagram it, so let me talk through it, and you let me know what you think. medicine, transportation. Shouldn’t we do so?

Collaborating when it matters

Clark Quinn

A dear friend and colleague just wrote about his recent (and urgent) chemo and surgery.  I won’t bore you with the details (the odds are you don’t know him), but one thing stuck with me that I do want to share. ” Collaboration was critical. There were two different domains in play, and they had to work and play well together.

Two separate systems?

Clark Quinn

I frequently say that L&D needs to move from just ensuring optimal execution to also supporting continual innovation. Start small, scale out, etc.

A complex look at task assignments

Clark Quinn

And a model emerged that I managed to recall when I finally did get up.  I’ve been workshopping it a bit since, tuning some details.

Coherent Implications

Clark Quinn

One of the things to do with models is use them as the basis to explain and predict. How does this model map to choices you make in the organization?

The probability of wasting money

Clark Quinn

Designing learning is a probability game.  To paraphrase Dorothy Parker, you can lead a learner to learning, but you can’t make them think. This is the point of learning engineering, applying learning science to the design of learning experiences. designing sufficient contextualized practice. developing emotional engagement. and so on.

A richer suite of support

Clark Quinn

While it’s easy to talk about how we need to support the transition from novice to expert, it might help to be a little more detailed. Can you?

Mindmapping

Clark Quinn

Mindmaps are a visual way of representing knowledge. You can similarly add color as a way to layer additional semantic information such as similarity.

The Grail of Effective and Engaging Learning Experiences

Clark Quinn

There’s a considerable gap between what we can be doing, and what we are doing. Too much elearning resides there. drama and/or humor. design

Ambiguity Denial Syndrome?

Clark Quinn

I was talking with a colleague at an event one of the past weeks, and I noted down the concept of ambiguity denial syndrome. So, are you ready?

Content isn’t a silo

Clark Quinn

Our silos are breaking down. And, to suit my campaign, I looked for others. The web, too, is a channel for many activities. strategy technology

Working and learning out loud

Clark Quinn

I’ve been thinking about some of the talk around the Future of Work, and in addition to the free flow of information I recently posted about from the Coherent Organization, I think working out loud is another component. The point is to make your work visible. And there are two dimensions: within the organization, and outside the organization.

John Black #ICELW Keynote Mindmap

Clark Quinn

Lots to ponder. design games meta-learning

Top 10 Tools for Learning 2016

Clark Quinn

It’s that time again: Jane Hart is running her 2016 (and 10th!) Top 100 Tools for Learning poll. It’s a valuable service, and points out some interesting things and it’s interesting to see the changes over time.  It’s also a way to see what others are using and maybe find some new ideas. Books are still a major way I learn.

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Scenarios and Conceptual Clarity

Clark Quinn

These are all approximations to full games, with various tradeoffs. And we can deliver this in a number of ways. design games

The wrong basis

Clark Quinn

Of late, I’ve been talking about the approach organizations take to learning.  It’s come up in presentations on learning design, measurement, and learning technology strategy. And the point is simple: we’re not using the right basis. identifying the root cause. mapping back to an intervention design. implementing our intervention.

Annie Murphy Paul #LSCon Keynote Mindmap

Clark Quinn

Annie Murphy Paul closed the Learning Solutions conference with a valuable presentation on the myths in learning. meta-learning

70:20:10 furor

Clark Quinn

I have to admit that I’m continually flummoxed by those who rail against the 70:20:10 model. Recent posts by Mark Britz and Ryan Tracey both take this on, Ryan’s in particular pointing to a poll where more than half of the respondents said it wasn’t relevant. And there’s been quite some vehement opposition. Really? Really.

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Socially Acceptable

Clark Quinn

I was talking with my ITA colleagues, and we were discussing the state of awareness of social learning. And we were somewhat concerned that at least from some evidence, there’re some misconceptions around about social learning. So I thought I’d take another shot at it. First, let me make the case why it’s important.

Defining Microlearning?

Clark Quinn

Last week on the #chat2lrn twitter chat, the topic was microlearning. Another interpretation was little bits of components of learning (examples, practice) delivered over time. That is learning, but it’s not microlearning. Again, a good thing, but not (to me) microlearning. This is what Will Thalheimer calls subscription learning.

eLearning Process Survey results!

Clark Quinn

So, a few weeks ago I ran a survey asking about elearning processes*, and it’s time to look at the results (I’ve closed it).

Metacognitive Activity?

Clark Quinn

So, as another outcome of the xAPI base camp a few weeks back, I was wondering about tracking not only learning , but meta-learning.

The Quinnovation eLearning Process Survey

Clark Quinn

In the interests of understanding where the market is, I’m looking to benchmark where organizations are. Sure, there are other data points, but I have my own questions I would like to get answered. So I’ve created a quick survey of seven questions (thanks, SurveyMonkey) I’d love for you to fill out. So here we are.  . Thanks!

Aligning with us

Clark Quinn

One of the realizations I had in writing the Revolutionize L&D book was how badly we’re out of synch with our brains.

Reactivating Learning

Clark Quinn

(I looked because I’m sure I’ve talked about this before, but apparently not a full post, so here we go.). If we want our learning to stick, it needs to be spaced out over time. But what sorts of things will accomplish this?  I like to think of three types, all different forms of reactivating learning. Reactivating learning is important.

Moving forward

Clark Quinn

So, I was chided that my last post was not helpful in moving people forward, as I was essentially being derogatory to those who weren’t applying the new understandings. However, I’m happy to also weigh in positively as well. The question may be where to start. And of course that will differ. It’s not easy. strategy

Designing Learning Like Professionals

Clark Quinn

I’m increasingly realizing that the ways we design and develop content are part of the reason why we’re not getting the respect we deserve. To truly design learning, we need to understand learning science. And this does  not mean paying attention to so-called ‘brain science’ There is legitimate brain science (c.f.

Serious Comics

Clark Quinn

I attended  ComicCon  again this year, and addition to the wild costumes, crowded exhibit hall, and over-priced food, there are a series of sessions. They cover television, movies, and print in a wide variety of markets. One I saw this year (not all of, for several reasons) was particularly thought-provoking. These are actually both serious issues.

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Social Training?

Clark Quinn

Sparked by the sight of a post about ‘social training’, I jokingly asked my ITA colleagues whether they could train me to be social. And, of course, they’ve posted about it. And it made me think a little bit more too. That’s the point, you can’t  make people engage. Particularly if it’s not safe to share.

Badass

Clark Quinn

That’s the actual title of a book, not me being a bit irreverent.  I’ve been a fan of Kathy Sierra’s since I came across her work, e.g. I regularly refer to how she expresses ‘ incrementalism ‘ She’s on top of usability and learning in very important ways. So what’s she doing differently? design