Do you really need separate social learning tools? PART TWO – 6 ways to integrate learning into the workflow

Jane Hart

In Part One of this series of blog postings, I asked the question: “As business is becoming more social and we are using new social tools to work collaboratively with one another, do we really need another set of social tools specifically for learning?” ” In this post I am going to be taking a look at 6 ways organisations are already integrating learning into their workflow systems – so that the same… Read the rest.

(5) Integrating the Learning Flow in the Workflow

Jane Hart

This is the fifth post in my series about Learning Flows. Social learning

Social Media is not Social Learning

Dan Pontefract

Social media is not social learning. Brian Solis took a crack at defining social media as follows: <the> democratization of information, transforming people from content readers into publishers. So why is social media not social learning?

From Social Learning to Workforce Collaboration

Jane Hart

Eagle-eyed readers will have noticed that I’ve changed this blog’s title from “Learning in the Social Workplace” to “Workforce Collaboration” Why? Well, to try and avoid the “learning” word or at least the term “social learning”! I therefore bring something quite different to the table than a consultant who just helps them add “social” into their training.

Why your Enterprise Social Network is your most valuable social learning platform

Jane Hart

This is the article I wrote for the January edition of Inside Learning Technologies magazine. It is an extract from my recent book, Modern Workplace Learning: A resource guide for L&D. In the workplace, social learning comes through social collaboration.

10 things to remember about social learning (and the use of social media for learning)

Jane Hart

Yesterday I listened into the #lscon Twitter stream for Learning Solutions conference in Orlando, Florida. There was some discussion about social learning, so I tweeted a few thoughts myself. Social learning is the lifeblood of all businesses. Social learning

Social Learning is NOT a new training trend

Jane Hart

I’ve written a few postings recently (notably Social Learning doesn’t mean what you think it does ) where I have tried to show how the fundamental changes in how businesses are operating, require a fundamental change in how the L&D function needs to view workplace learning. I suggested this means a move from a “Command and Control” approach to an “Encourage and Engage” approach to Workplace Learning. Traditional workplace learning.

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Five Myths of Social Learning

Xyleme

Home > Social Learning > Five Myths of Social Learning Five Myths of Social Learning December 3rd, 2009 Goto comments Leave a comment There is no question that the rise of social networks is creating a profound shift in the way training departments are delivering knowledge to their employees, partners, and customers. Social learning is disruptive and training organizations need to evolve or die, there is no disputing this.

Social Learning doesn’t mean what you think it does: PART TWO

Jane Hart

Yesterday, in my first posting on this topic, I showed how “social learning” is not just about a new training trend or about adding social media into the “blend&# or acquiring the latest Social Learning Management System, but a fundamental change in how we need to view workplace learning.

Using a collaborative platform for brilliant learning

Jane Hart

That’s the topic of my webinar at the Online Learning & Skills Conference that will take place on Thursday 28 June from 1 pm – 1.45 Present an overview of the key social features of social collaboration platforms.

Workplace Performance Services: more than just Training

Jane Hart

Social learning

Introducing Share&Learn

Jane Hart

Tweet I recently launched Share&Learn – a new collaboration platform where members can share links, resources, ideas, experiences, tips, etc about the use of learning and performance trends, technologies and tools, in order to learn from one another – both informally and formally.

Why support self-organized learning in the workplace?

Jane Hart

Because that is how today’s Smart Workers (SW) prefer to learn. So I’ve now annotated my previous diagram to show how 8 key ways that Smart Workers learn today map onto the diagram. self-directed learning Social learning

Social & Collaborative Learning in the Workplace

Jane Hart

On Wednesday 22 August at 5 pm BST – that’s 9 AM (PDT) / 12 PM (EDT) – I will be presenting a webinar, hosted by Citrix Online, on Social & Collaborative Learning in the Workplace. Attend the webinar to find out : How to support social learning in the workplace.

A new framework for supporting learning and performance in the social workplace

Jane Hart

Social tools are changing not only the way that professionals are working and learning but also the way that organisations are transforming into social businesses. This service area will continue to design, deliver and manage training, e-learning and/or blended learning events.

From “learning technologies” to “social technologies”

Jane Hart

Social technologies now play a big part in everything we do, and it is quite clear that many knowledge workers use a variety of social tools and networks not only to help them get work done, but also to learn efficiently while on the job. Social learning

Supporting self-managed team learning in the organisation

Jane Hart

This is a post in a series that I am writing about how the future role of L&D is moving from “packaging learning” to “scaffolding learning”. But what these both have in common is that they are still a “ managed learning ” process. Social learning

Towards the Connected L&D Department

Jane Hart

In my previous post I shared a chart I have been using to demonstrate what it means for the L&D function to move from a “packaging” role to one that helps to support and “scaffold” learning in the flow of daily work. Social learning

Social as a Weapon of Class Destruction

Dan Pontefract

The aforementioned line is recognized as the first known use of the term ‘weapons of mass destruction’ But today, in 2013, I want to discuss a new weapon — a weapon of class destruction — and that weapon is social. the physical place we go to learn.

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Supporting the Social Workplace Learning Continuum

Jane Hart

So one approach that I have been promoting is, instead of thinking of Formal and Informal Leaning as polar opposites, rather to think in terms of a Social Workplace Learning Continuum (as shown diagrammatically in the image on the right). Social learning

The differences between learning in an e-business and learning in a social business

Jane Hart

In my recent webinar I shared a slide that showed the 5 stages of workplace learning. This has attracted a lot of interest, and I’ve been asked to talk more about the differences between “learning” in Stages 1-4 and Stage 5. Now, let’s be clear about what a social business is.

Overcoming the Course and Control mindset hurdles

Jane Hart

My two recent Learning in the Workplace surveys showed that ( a ) people consider that informal learning is much more important, if not essential, to them than training, and ( b ) that they learn informally on a much more regular (if not continuous) basis than they learn formally.

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Workforce Development Services: A new framework of training and learning support

Jane Hart

In my last blog post, From Social Learning to Workforce Collaboration , I talked about how I have been helping organisations support workforce collaboration. Collaboration Social learning

Survey: Are you ready, willing and able to support learning in the new social workplace?

Jane Hart

Some time ago I wrote a blog post about how I believed that as social businesses emerge, and new social and collaboration platforms (or social intranets) are introduced into enterprises, L&D will have an extended role in the organisation in order to support the new community and collaboration skills that will be required to underpin a successul social business initiative. (In In this way, then Social Collaboration becomes the missing piece of the L&D jigsaw.

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Through the Workscape Looking Glass

Jay Cross

Learning Ecosystem, Learning Ecology, and Learnscape mean the same thing as Workscape. I don’t use the word learn with executives, who inevitably think back to the awfulness of school and close their ears. Many old hands will not tolerate them nor learn from them if they do.

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Standalone LMS is Still Dead (rebutting & agreeing w/ Dave Wilkins)

Dan Pontefract

Last week, Dave Wilkins of Learn.com wrote a piece entitled “ A Defense of the LMS (and a case for the future of social learning) ”. My in-person and virtual interactions with him have been nothing less than stimulating, social and cerebral. Why Learning 2.0 & Enterprise 2.0

Micro-blogging can help build your organisational culture

Dan Pontefract

Increasing social status of employees in business related matters. Weak chance of disrupting already established workflows. Culture learning micro-blogging organization social social learning social media teams

Micro-blogging can help build your organisational culture

Dan Pontefract

Increasing social status of employees in business related matters. Weak chance of disrupting already established workflows. Culture learning micro-blogging organization social social learning social media teams

Why You Must Define the So-What of Learning

Dan Pontefract

Whether you work for a private family-owned business, a publicly traded corporation or in the kindergarten-to-higher-education continuum somewhere, you’re going to have to define learning – whether it’s for your employees, colleagues or students. So let’s examine the “so what” learning definition – meaning why learning is present in organizations. In my opinion, learning is part formal, informal and social. social learning Culture social

Four Ways User-Generated Content (UGC) Can Make its Way into.

Xyleme

Home > Learning Content Management , Social Learning > Four Ways User-Generated Content (UGC) Can Make its Way into Formal Learning Four Ways User-Generated Content (UGC) Can Make its Way into Formal Learning January 20th, 2010 Goto comments Leave a comment This past week, I’ve been reading and referring to Jane Hart’s article The State of Social Learning Today and some Thoughts for the Future of L&D in 2010 quite a bit.

Embedding Learning in Work: The Benefits and Challenges

Charles Jennings

If people learn as part of the workflow then this learning is more likely to impact performance in a positive way. The same study found employees with high exposure to on-the-job learning activities were 262% more engaged than those who had no exposure to on-the-job learning.

working collaboratively and learning cooperatively

Harold Jarche

Learning and development (L&D) practices reflect this priority on error reduction.But knowledge work, especially creative work, is not mere production. Visualize the workflow of a physical job: produce, produce, produce, produce, produce, produce, produce, produce, produce.

Re-thinking Workplace Learning: extracting rather than adding

Charles Jennings

One clear finding presented was that: “t hose activities that are integrated into manager and employee workflow have the largest impact on employee performance, while those that are distinct events separate from the day-to-day job have less impact.”

Autonomy and Value in Social and Workplace Learning

Charles Jennings

It shows the relationship between relative value and relative autonomy as they relate to different approaches to learning in the modern workplace. 70:20:10 Model The 70:20:10 model is used to extend learning into the workflow.

70:20:10 - Beyond the Blend

Charles Jennings

The term ‘blended learning’ first appeared in the late-1990s when web-based learning solutions started to become more widely used and were integrated on one way or another with face-to-face methods. There are many other examples of ‘blending’ learning stretching back into the past, too.

how professionals learn for work

Harold Jarche

Jane Hart has been asking her readers what are the most useful/valuable ways that they learn for or at work. E-learning courses. It is interesting to note that most people value learning that is directly connected to their workflow.

70:20:10 - A Framework for High Performance Development Practices

Charles Jennings

Others use it more strategically as a way to help them rethink and reposition their wider learning philosophies. Of course structured and directed ‘formal’ learning can help, but it rarely, if ever, provides the complete answer.

The Power of Reflection in an Ever-Changing World

Charles Jennings

Yet one of the most useful tools for effective learning and development is reflection. Critical reflection is one of the four fundamental ways in which we learn and improve. This holds true for learning in the workplace and in life. It is a learned process.

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Start with the 70. Plan for the 100.

Charles Jennings

Extending Learning into the Workflow Many Learning & Development leaders are using the 70:20:10 model to help them re-position their focus for building and supporting performance across their organisations. The closer learning is to work, usually the better.

70:20:10 – Above All Else It’s a Change Agent

Charles Jennings

Tom is a rocket scientist and helps other helps rocket scientists learn their stuff. Recently Tom wrote a series of blogs titled ‘ Ten Things I Believe About Workplace Learning ’. People aren’t hired to learn, they’re hired to increase productivity or capability.

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70-20-10: Origin, Research, Purpose

Charles Jennings

Calhoun Wick Cal is deeply experienced and knowledgeable in the area of workplace learning. Cal’s company has also developed the 70-20 tool , which supports learning in the workflow in innovative and measurable ways – it is well worth test driving.

2012: That was the year that was

Jane Hart

1 - The Top 100 Tools for Learning 2012 list is revealed. On 1 October 2012 I revealed the results of the 6th Annual Survey of Tools for Learning – the Top 100 Tools for Learning 2012 – and provided a brief analysis of the results.

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LMS vs. LCMS

Xyleme

While sometimes thought to be interchangeable terms, LMS (Learning Management System) and LCMS (Learning Content Management System) platforms share a few functionalities, but couldn’t be more different. Assigned learning. Individualized learning plan. Learning paths.