Do you really need separate social learning tools? PART TWO – 6 ways to integrate learning into the workflow

Jane Hart

In Part One of this series of blog postings, I asked the question: “As business is becoming more social and we are using new social tools to work collaboratively with one another, do we really need another set of social tools specifically for learning?” ” In this post I am going to be taking a look at 6 ways organisations are already integrating learning into their workflow systems – so that the same… Read the rest.

Social Media is not Social Learning

Dan Pontefract

Social media is not social learning. Brian Solis took a crack at defining social media as follows: <the> democratization of information, transforming people from content readers into publishers. Andreas Kaplan and Michael Haenlein define social media as: <a> group of Internet-based applications that build on the ideological and technological foundations of Web 2.0, So why is social media not social learning?

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(5) Integrating the Learning Flow in the Workflow

Jane Hart

This is the fifth post in my series about Learning Flows. In previous posts I have explained how a Learning Flow is a continuous steady stream of social-micro-learning activities how the three main types of Learning Flow: (a) daily news flow; (2) themed flow and (3) circular flow can be used within education, for professional [.]. Social learning

From Social Learning to Workforce Collaboration

Jane Hart

Eagle-eyed readers will have noticed that I’ve changed this blog’s title from “Learning in the Social Workplace” to “Workforce Collaboration” Why? Well, to try and avoid the “learning” word or at least the term “social learning”! I therefore bring something quite different to the table than a consultant who just helps them add “social” into their training.

Five Myths of Social Learning

Xyleme

Home > Social Learning > Five Myths of Social Learning Five Myths of Social Learning December 3rd, 2009 Goto comments Leave a comment There is no question that the rise of social networks is creating a profound shift in the way training departments are delivering knowledge to their employees, partners, and customers. Social learning is disruptive and training organizations need to evolve or die, there is no disputing this.

10 things to remember about social learning (and the use of social media for learning)

Jane Hart

Yesterday I listened into the #lscon Twitter stream for Learning Solutions conference in Orlando, Florida. There was some discussion about social learning, so I tweeted a few thoughts myself. Social learning is not what you make people do (as in training) – but something that happens naturally and spontaneously every day – at work as well as at home. Social learning is the lifeblood of all businesses. Social learning

Why your Enterprise Social Network is your most valuable social learning platform

Jane Hart

This is the article I wrote for the January edition of Inside Learning Technologies magazine. It is an extract from my recent book, Modern Workplace Learning: A resource guide for L&D. In the workplace, social learning comes through social collaboration. Social learning is a natural everyday phenomenon; simply put, we learn from our colleagues as we work with them. Social learning

Social Learning doesn’t mean what you think it does!

Jane Hart

A few days ago my Internet Time Alliance colleague, Harold Jarche, shared this article, written by Deb Lavoy, with me: Social Business Doesn’t Mean What You Think It Does, Neither Does Enterprise 2.0. Social Business” is not about technology, or about “corporate culture.” Learning and self-expression are exploding. The changes we are seeing in Workplace Learning are of course just one part of the changes we are seeing in businesses as whole.

Social Learning doesn’t mean what you think it does: PART TWO

Jane Hart

Yesterday, in my first posting on this topic, I showed how “social learning” is not just about a new training trend or about adding social media into the “blend&# or acquiring the latest Social Learning Management System, but a fundamental change in how we need to view workplace learning. Let’s first take a look at managing and measuring employee “learning&#. So how then do we measure learning in the workplace?

Introducing Share&Learn

Jane Hart

Tweet I recently launched Share&Learn – a new collaboration platform where members can share links, resources, ideas, experiences, tips, etc about the use of learning and performance trends, technologies and tools, in order to learn from one another – both informally and formally.

Using a collaborative platform for brilliant learning

Jane Hart

That’s the topic of my webinar at the Online Learning & Skills Conference that will take place on Thursday 28 June from 1 pm – 1.45 Present an overview of the key social features of social collaboration platforms. Demonstrate a number of examples of social activities she has set up. Propose a lite approach to designing social (learning) activities. Show how learning can be embedded in the workflow. >

Workplace Performance Services: more than just Training

Jane Hart

In his recent post, Informal Learning , 95% solution, Harold Jarche provides the reason why many workplace learning professionals can only think about “informal learning” and “social learning” in terms of how they can manage them within a blended training solution – rather than simply support them, as they happen, naturally and continuously, in the workflow. Social learning

Why support self-organized learning in the workplace?

Jane Hart

Because that is how today’s Smart Workers (SW) prefer to learn. So I’ve now annotated my previous diagram to show how 8 key ways that Smart Workers learn today map onto the diagram. The Smart Worker (SW) learns continuously as she does her job > Integrate learning in the workflow. The Smart Worker (SW) is happy to share what she learns > Encourage employee generated content. self-directed learning Social learning

Standalone LMS is Still Dead (rebutting & agreeing w/ Dave Wilkins)

Dan Pontefract

Last week, Dave Wilkins of Learn.com wrote a piece entitled “ A Defense of the LMS (and a case for the future of social learning) ”. My in-person and virtual interactions with him have been nothing less than stimulating, social and cerebral. Why Learning 2.0 & Enterprise 2.0

Social & Collaborative Learning in the Workplace

Jane Hart

On Wednesday 22 August at 5 pm BST – that’s 9 AM (PDT) / 12 PM (EDT) – I will be presenting a webinar, hosted by Citrix Online, on Social & Collaborative Learning in the Workplace. Here’s a description of the event: Social learning is a natural, continual process of learning with others , and with the help of modern social technologies, you can enable and support it in powerful new ways. . Social learning

Social as a Weapon of Class Destruction

Dan Pontefract

The aforementioned line is recognized as the first known use of the term ‘weapons of mass destruction’ But today, in 2013, I want to discuss a new weapon — a weapon of class destruction — and that weapon is social. Let’s first define what I mean by ‘class’ I’d like the term class in my social as a weapon of class destruction thesis to denote two things for purposes of this piece: societal & organizational status.

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learning in the flow of work

Harold Jarche

Implicit knowledge is often developed through conversations and social relationships. Social learning networks — with trusted relationships — enable better and faster knowledge feedback loops. Learning among ourselves is integral to complex and creative work.

A new framework for supporting learning and performance in the social workplace

Jane Hart

Social tools are changing not only the way that professionals are working and learning but also the way that organisations are transforming into social businesses. In the new connected workplace, current training, e-learning or blended learning services, which take a top-down, ”command and control” approach to organising and managing “learning” will not be appropriate to support these new ways of working and learning. Social learning

Through the Workscape Looking Glass

Jay Cross

Learning Ecosystem, Learning Ecology, and Learnscape mean the same thing as Workscape. I don’t use the word learn with executives, who inevitably think back to the awfulness of school and close their ears. In the same vein, I talk about Working Smarter instead of informal learning, social learning, and so forth. Some people denigrate informal learning but nobody’s against Working Smarter. However, compliance is not learning. Action learning.

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From “learning technologies” to “social technologies”

Jane Hart

Social technologies now play a big part in everything we do, and it is quite clear that many knowledge workers use a variety of social tools and networks not only to help them get work done, but also to learn efficiently while on the job. We also know that this informal, social learning accounts for 80% or more of how people learn in the workplace, so it is not something to be dismissed as irrelevant or trivial. Social learning

Four Ways User-Generated Content (UGC) Can Make its Way into.

Xyleme

Home > Learning Content Management , Social Learning > Four Ways User-Generated Content (UGC) Can Make its Way into Formal Learning Four Ways User-Generated Content (UGC) Can Make its Way into Formal Learning January 20th, 2010 Goto comments Leave a comment This past week, I’ve been reading and referring to Jane Hart’s article The State of Social Learning Today and some Thoughts for the Future of L&D in 2010 quite a bit.

Supporting self-managed team learning in the organisation

Jane Hart

This is a post in a series that I am writing about how the future role of L&D is moving from “packaging learning” to “scaffolding learning”. In the first post I explained that “packaging learning” involves organizing and wrapping up everything an individual needs to learn in a neat parcel, delivering it to them on a plate, and making sure they do it, whilst “scaffolding” is about supporting learning in many other less top-down organized ways.

Survey: Are you ready, willing and able to support learning in the new social workplace?

Jane Hart

Some time ago I wrote a blog post about how I believed that as social businesses emerge, and new social and collaboration platforms (or social intranets) are introduced into enterprises, L&D will have an extended role in the organisation in order to support the new community and collaboration skills that will be required to underpin a successul social business initiative. (In In this way, then Social Collaboration becomes the missing piece of the L&D jigsaw.

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Why You Must Define the So-What of Learning

Dan Pontefract

Whether you work for a private family-owned business, a publicly traded corporation or in the kindergarten-to-higher-education continuum somewhere, you’re going to have to define learning – whether it’s for your employees, colleagues or students. So let’s examine the “so what” learning definition – meaning why learning is present in organizations. In my opinion, learning is part formal, informal and social. social learning Culture social

Towards the Connected L&D Department

Jane Hart

In my previous post I shared a chart I have been using to demonstrate what it means for the L&D function to move from a “packaging” role to one that helps to support and “scaffold” learning in the flow of daily work. Firstly, the red area is the traditional L&D operating area – designing, delivering and managing instruction (ie face-to-face training and e-learning). Social learning

Micro-blogging can help build your organisational culture

Dan Pontefract

On the one hand, there are many employees utilising Twitter (or external micro-blogging) to connect, learn, share and inspire with external friends, family and even colleagues; on the other, organisations haven’t yet grasped how this invaluable technique might actually help with its internal culture, its objectives, and ultimately its business results. Increasing social status of employees in business related matters. Weak chance of disrupting already established workflows.

Supporting the Social Workplace Learning Continuum

Jane Hart

In my previous blog post I explained how I recognized it is difficult for a lot of organisations to support informal and social learning in their organisations, because they are unable to jump the two mindset hurdles of (a) thinking that learning only happens in training courses, and (b) that all organisational learning needs to be controlled by Training/L&D departments. Social learning

The differences between learning in an e-business and learning in a social business

Jane Hart

In my recent webinar I shared a slide that showed the 5 stages of workplace learning. This has attracted a lot of interest, and I’ve been asked to talk more about the differences between “learning” in Stages 1-4 and Stage 5. Working and learning in Stages 1-4 is based upon a Taylorist , industrial age mindset. Similarly e-learning was also about automating traditional training practices. So whilst e-business is about automation, social business is about innovation.

Overcoming the Course and Control mindset hurdles

Jane Hart

My two recent Learning in the Workplace surveys showed that ( a ) people consider that informal learning is much more important, if not essential, to them than training, and ( b ) that they learn informally on a much more regular (if not continuous) basis than they learn formally. These findings are of course in line with study after study that shows that most learning in the workplace happens outside of formal training. Social learning

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Workforce Development Services: A new framework of training and learning support

Jane Hart

In my last blog post, From Social Learning to Workforce Collaboration , I talked about how I have been helping organisations support workforce collaboration. Following that post Dan Pontefract asked me this question: “Is this something that helps an external consultant, like yourself and ITA more so than it does those working inside an organization in a traditional ‘learning’ team?” Collaboration Social learning

Micro-blogging can help build your organisational culture

Dan Pontefract

On the one hand, there are many employees utilising Twitter (or external micro-blogging) to connect, learn, share and inspire with external friends, family and even colleagues; on the other, organisations haven’t yet grasped how this invaluable technique might actually help with its internal culture, its objectives, and ultimately its business results. Increasing social status of employees in business related matters. Weak chance of disrupting already established workflows.

making time for learning

Harold Jarche

For over a decade I have promoted the idea that work is learning & learning is the work. It seems the idea has now gone mainstream, as it’s even noted in Forbes that, “Work and learning will become analogous” It is much easier to just say that workflow learning is essential rather than putting in the structures and practices that can enable it. Social and informal learning are key to increasing insights that can drive innovation.

how professionals learn for work

Harold Jarche

Jane Hart has been asking her readers what are the most useful/valuable ways that they learn for or at work. E-learning courses. It is interesting to note that most people value learning that is directly connected to their workflow.

Embedding Learning in Work: The Benefits and Challenges

Charles Jennings

(a version of this article was originally written as background for an #OzLearn chat held on Twitter, 11th November 2014) The Power of Embedded Learning A common finding that has emerged from study after study over the past few years is that learning which is embedded in work seems to be more effective than learning away from work. If people learn as part of the workflow then this learning is more likely to impact performance in a positive way.

Re-thinking Workplace Learning: extracting rather than adding

Charles Jennings

One clear finding presented was that: “t hose activities that are integrated into manager and employee workflow have the largest impact on employee performance, while those that are distinct events separate from the day-to-day job have less impact.” In other words if people have the opportunity to learn and develop as part of their work and they are supported by their manager, then learning will be much better transformed into measurable behavioural change and performance improvement.

working collaboratively and learning cooperatively

Harold Jarche

Learning and development (L&D) practices reflect this priority on error reduction.But knowledge work, especially creative work, is not mere production. Visualize the workflow of a physical job: produce, produce, produce, produce, produce, produce, produce, produce, produce. Now visualize the workflow of a creative knowledge worker: nothing, nothing, nothing, nothing, flash of brilliance, nothing, nothing, nothing.” —Jay Learning is the Work.

insights over processes

Harold Jarche

For the more complex work done by people, we have to find ways to improve insights, and social learning is how we do it. Social learning involves transparent knowledge sharing, questioning assumptions, and experimenting together. To improve insights on an organizational level, all work must be focused on learning. Therefore, social and informal learning need to be integrated into the workflow.

Autonomy and Value in Social and Workplace Learning

Charles Jennings

It shows the relationship between relative value and relative autonomy as they relate to different approaches to learning in the modern workplace. Learning in the Modern Workplace’ Model Jane’s diagram shows the increasing value that can be released through exploiting learning opportunities beyond ‘the course’ – or the curriculum. 70:20:10 Model The 70:20:10 model is used to extend learning into the workflow.

70:20:10 - Beyond the Blend

Charles Jennings

The term ‘blended learning’ first appeared in the late-1990s when web-based learning solutions started to become more widely used and were integrated on one way or another with face-to-face methods. There are many other examples of ‘blending’ learning stretching back into the past, too. However, the incorporation of technology into learning or training delivery has given blended learning a boost. Blended learning almost always falls into the ‘adding’ category.

70:20:10 - A Framework for High Performance Development Practices

Charles Jennings

Others use it more strategically as a way to help them rethink and reposition their wider learning philosophies. The 70:20:10 framework is a simple concept that has developed from work carried out by various researchers over the past half-century that suggests a one-dimensional focus on structured training and development – a rut that many organisations had fallen into – misses the opportunity to exploit learning and development where most of it happens, which is within the workflow.

The Power of Reflection in an Ever-Changing World

Charles Jennings

Yet one of the most useful tools for effective learning and development is reflection. Critical reflection is one of the four fundamental ways in which we learn and improve. This holds true for learning in the workplace and in life. Research tells us that immersive learning and learning in context provides the most memorable learning experiences. However, experiential learning is still often under-valued and under-exploited by learning professionals.

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LMS vs. LCMS

Xyleme

The Learning and Development industry, like any other, has been inundated with new technologies and tools for learning. Buzz words in the industry include e-learning, mobile learning, cloud delivery, bite-sized learning, informal learning, learning record store, and single-source content development. Another important learning tool that some may not be familiar with is a Learning Content Management System (LCMS). Learning Paths. ?. ?.

LMS vs. LCMS

Xyleme

While sometimes thought to be interchangeable terms, LMS (Learning Management System) and LCMS (Learning Content Management System) platforms share a few functionalities, but couldn’t be more different. A Learning Management System (LMS) is a software application that allows a company, school, or organization to administer, document, track, and report on the delivery of educational courses and training programs. Assigned learning. Individualized learning plan.