The Puzzling Personal Productivity Paradox

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Yet, despite these impressive advances, for most of this period economies around the world have been stuck in an era of slow productivity growth. Opinions abound, but in the end, there’s no consensus on the causes of this apparent productivity paradox , on how long the slowdown will likely last, or on what to do about it. A few contend that there’s been a fundamental decline in innovation and productivity over the past few decades, compared to the period between 1870 and 1970.

hyper-connected pattern seeking

Harold Jarche

Workers have to be able to recognize patterns in complexity and chaos and be empowered to do something with their observations and insights. It is only through innovative and contextual methods, the self-selection of the most appropriate tools and work conditions, and willing cooperation that more productive work can be assured. Innovative and contextual methods mean that standard processes do not work for exception-handling or identifying new patterns.

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Global Arbitrage and the Productivity Puzzle

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

A couple of weeks ago I wrote about The Productivity Puzzle , - namely that despite our continuing technology advances, the US and other developed economies have experienced a sharp decline in productivity growth over the past 10 to 15 years. So far, though, economists have failed to reach consensus on the causes of the productivity growth slowdown or indeed the relative significance of the various arguments,” wrote McKinsey.

Idiots, Networks and Patterns

Harold Jarche

The Physics of Finance: The more chaotic our environment & less control we have, the more we see non-existent simple patterns , or as Valdis Krebs pointed out, seeing fictitious patterns in random data is called “ apophenia &#. Just as video went from a handful of broadcast networks to millions of producers on YouTube within a decade, a massive transition from centralized production to a “maker culture” of dispersed manufacturing innovation is under way today.

Collective intelligence patterns

Clark Quinn

In his presentation on The Landscape of Collective Intelligence, he comes up with four characteristics of design patterns (or genes, as he calls them): What (strategy), Who (staffing), How (structure & process), & Why (incentives/alignment). This is a really nice systematic breakdown into patterns tied to real examples. Still, a great foundation for thinking about using networks in productive ways.

Global Arbitrage and the Productivity Puzzle

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

A couple of weeks ago I wrote about The Productivity Puzzle , - namely that despite our continuing technology advances, the US and other developed economies have experienced a sharp decline in productivity growth over the past 10 to 15 years. So far, though, economists have failed to reach consensus on the causes of the productivity growth slowdown or indeed the relative significance of the various arguments,” wrote McKinsey.

Learning products

Harold Jarche

Heike Philp recently made this comment in response to Media & Messages : What I am sorely missing right now are ‘learning products’. To me a product has product specifications (specs) just as much as a computer has a list of specs or software has a list of features. The fascination of Pecha Kucha for me is, that this simple idea could be patented and that it is a ‘product’, it has specs, the specs are ‘20 slides auto advancing 20 sec’.

Workplace Productivity

Tony Karrer

One of the favorite quotes I used to use during presentations was Drucker - The most important contribution of management in the 21st century will be to increase knowledge-worker productivity. Complexity of Productivity for Knowledge Work Productivity is defined as: the ratio of the quantity and quality of units produced to the labor per unit of time For some knowledge workers, we can reasonably define things this way.

Reflections on Innovation, Productivity and Job Creation

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

I have also been thinking a lot about the impact of these innovations on the productivity of the service sector of the economy in general, and in particular, on the kinds of jobs that we can expect to be created over the next decades to replace those jobs that might decline or disappear as a result of such productivity improvements. Although there are numerous technological innovations that have improved the productivity of services over the past century (e.g.,

Travelling for work: 7 principles for productivity and value

Trends in the Living Networks

While travel itself can easily become a routine, it gives us an opportunity to break the patterns that limit the scope of what we perceive. Many others have shared good advice on these topics so here I’ve just tried to stick to some of the things that matter most to me in making my travel productive and valuable. Over the last 9 weeks I’ve been on a plane every week, have been on 26 flights or inter-city trains, and delivered 28 keynotes or workshops across 8 countries.

Three Models of Knowledge Production

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

It should be contrasted with some alternatives: knowledge production as mining - on this view, data is like a raw material that is searched for and retrieved. knowledge production as construction - on this view, data is like a raw material, but you work with it with your hands, and create something new out of what you have been given. knowledge production as growth - on this view, data is like a raw material that serves as a nutrient or growth medium.

Toward a Pattern Language for Enterprise 2.0 : Andrew McAfee’s Blog

Andy McAfee

Andrew McAfee’s Blog The Business Impact of IT Home Home RSS Search Toward a Pattern Language for Enterprise 2.0 June 10 2009 Comments to this post A Pattern Language , published in 1979 by Christopher Alexander and his colleagues, was a landmark book in architecture that also became a landmark in other fields like computer science ; one review called it “The decade’s best candidate for a permanently important book.&# First is a set of patterns where 2.0

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: Patterns of Business Innovation in China and India

John Hagel

From a strategist’s viewpoint, though, what I miss in such coverage is any deep analysis of the patterns of business innovation that might help to explain the explosive growth in both economies or the implications for Western companies. Open distribution - the first pattern of innovation In this respect, Business Week does a better job on the India front. which has successfully pursued a similar pattern of innovation in India.

6 Tips for Nonprofits to Combat Digital Distraction and Improve Productivity

Beth Kanter

It is one of a growing number of “ digital diseases ” that can cause painful physical symptoms as well as mental health issues that ultimately make you less productive, depressed, and sick. The benefits of taking control of your digital life in and outside the office are immense: greater presence and mindful attention, enhanced productivity and creativity, better relationships, improved sleep and less risk of anxiety. Image Source: 7able. On Feb.

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: Retailers and Customers

John Hagel

Almost a decade ago, I detected an intriguing pattern regarding the unbundling and rebundling of firms (purchase unfortunately required). The first wave of outsourcing can be understood as the systematic carving out of the infrastructure management businesses from companies, but we’re just on the cusp of a second wave that will unbundle product innovation and commercialization businesses from customer relationship businesses.

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: Stock Buybacks - A Red Flag?

John Hagel

As we move from one year into the next, it is a good time to step back and reflect on patterns emerging in various areas of the business landscape. One pattern that I find disturbing is the growth of stock buyback activity. Unless companies have the innovation capacity to redeploy these savings rapidly into productive new business initiatives, they will end up shrinking.

UX Week 2014: Meet the Keynotes

Adaptive Path

Amanda will be talking about the emerging patterns she’s seeing in how architects and interior designers are creating practical spaces with emotional appeal. We’ve been trying for a long time to get digital product design thinker Josh Clark at UX Week, and I’m happy to say we finally nabbed him.

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: Offshoring - The GE and McKinsey Connection

John Hagel

She zeroes in on an interesting pattern: the growing number of GE and McKinsey alumni that are running offshore outsourcing businesses: While there are no numbers, anecdotal evidence suggests that scores, perhaps hundreds, of former GE and McKinsey executives and consultants play key roles as both suppliers of outsourced services and customers for them.

Experimentation: chocolate cakes and communicators | Full Circle Associates

Nancy White

What gets us moving beyond our customary habits and patterns? And what a wonderful and productive, chocolately surprise that can be. Viv McWaters on 29 Sep 2008 at 8:48 pm Hi Nancy Synchronicity does it for me every time – wakes me up when I start seeing a pattern. And what a wonderful and productive, chocolately surprise that can be.’

State of the Net 2012 – People Tweet Tacit Knowledge – Part Two

Luis Suarez

That’s the full impression you will get as well from this keynote and it’s all probably down to his perception of how we are all Irrational creatures , pattern based intelligences , and not information processing devices. And funny enough if I look into my own Social Web consumption and production of content, he’s absolutely spot on! . IBM Innovation Knowledge Management Learning Personal KM Productivity Tools Social Enterprise

Reflections from 2011 – A World Without Email – The Documentary

Luis Suarez

And what’s even more exciting is that it’s starting to happen at the right time , for once, because over the course of the last few months we have been exposed to a good number of different relevant reads as to why plenty of knowledge workers keep considering corporate email a time waster , a hindrance of one’s own productivity , or rather costly to the business , not to mention the potential security issues incurred or a rather growing issue of email overload altogether.

Impact of Data Analytics in Today’s Digital Workplace

elsua: The Knowledge Management Blog

A global software firm that builds solutions around data analytics for collaborative environments, whether for traditional tools like email, to cloud-based productivity apps like Microsoft Teams, to Enterprise Social Networking platforms like HCL Connections. Knowledge Management Knowledge Tools Learning Open Business Open Leadership Productivity Tools

Social Business Forum 2011 – Communities or Organisations – The New Collaboration Ecology

Luis Suarez

This major driving force of adoption of much more powerful and emergent collaboration and knowledge sharing tools results in a massive shift of how corporations operate, both internally and externally, transitioning from the old concept of project teams, imposed from high above to top down by the organisation itself, to different collaboration patterns, or personas that clearly reflect the complexity of the working environment we have been exposed to over the last few years.

BlueIQ at IBM Finally Goes External!

Luis Suarez

Rather, you are creating patterns of behavior for collaborating and connecting that will transcend today’s innovations and position your business and your people for tomorrow. IBM Innovation Knowledge Management Knowledge Tools Personal KM Productivity Tools Social Enterprise( Note: You see?

May the Network Force Be With You

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

The more products or services a platform offers, the more consumers it will attract, helping it then attract more offerings, which in turn brings in more consumers, making the platform even more valuable.

What History Tells Us About the Accelerating AI Revolution

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

But, in fact, serious concerns about the impact of technology are part of a historical pattern. “Many of the trends we see today, such as the disappearance of middle-income jobs, stagnant wages and growing inequality were also features of the Industrial Revolution, which began in Britain around 1750. Computers followed a similar pattern. Productivity growth has slowed since 2005, but seen through the lens of history it is not all that puzzling,” noted Frey.

Are We Becoming a Decadent, Stagnating Society?

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Douthat references Northwestern University economist Robert Gordon , who’s extensively argued that over the past few decades there’s been a fundamental decline in innovation and productivity. How about the slow productivity and economic growth?

The Social Network Is the Computer

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Social media could deliver an incredible wave of productivity, innovation, social welfare, democratization, equality, health, positivity, unity, and progress.

I Know It When I See It

Andy McAfee

product?&# – are just windowdressing on products that are still essentially geared for Collaboration 1.0. Whose products at present come closest to enabling Web 2.0-style collaboration and interaction in enterprise environments? These are all activities that help patterns and structure appear, and that let the cream of the content rise to the top for all platform members, no matter how they define what the cream is.

Newspapers, Paywalls, and Core Users ? Clay Shirky

Clay Shirky

This may be the year where newspapers finally drop the idea of treating all news as a product, and all readers as customers. Then, in March, the New York Times introduced a charge for readers who crossed a certain threshold of article views (a pattern copied from the financial press, and especially the Financial Times ) which is generating substantial revenue. The easy part of treating digital news as a product is getting money from 2% of your audience. Clay Shirky.

Flexuosity untangled

Dave Snowden

There remains some correspondence but I am not really interested in a product life cycle per se here, other than as something which inherits from a wider market positioning. For products, this is Moore’s chasm where the next level of purchaser wants more proof before they will commit.

Reflections on the Later Stages of Our Careers

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

A few parameters account for most individual differences: the age at which the career starts, the career’s initial creative potential, the rates at which new ideas are generated, and the rate at which the ideas become finished results as publications or products.

The Pace of Creative Destruction is Accelerating

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

For a startup a transformative innovation is all upside, an opportunity to take-on established companies with new products that offer significantly better capabilities and/or lower costs. Already consumed with managing their existing operations, - e.g., products and services; supply chain and channel partners; sales and customer relationships; revenues, profits and cash; - they may see a new transformative innovation as more of a threat or distraction than an opportunity.

Beyond Machine Learning: Capturing Cause-and-Effect Relationships

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Deep learning is a powerful statistical technique for classifying patterns using large training data sets and multi-layer AI neural networks. Machine learning is a statistical modelling technique, like data mining and business analytics , which finds and correlates patterns between inputs and outputs without necessarily capturing their cause-and-effect relationships. Why are there such universal human activity patterns?

The Future of Online Learning 2020

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

The value proposition is an easy-to-understand reason why a customer should buy a product or service. Our clothing defines where we can go, our food production system defines how many people we can support, and so on. When you look at anything patterns begin to emerge.

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: Process versus Practice

John Hagel

In the course of his announcement, Ken made some observations that touch on some broader patterns emerging in the enterprise software business: When I sat down with Joe to talk about JotSpot, I was a bit skeptical of serving the enterprise. Id sworn off enterprise software, and really wanted to keep building consumer Internet products. My epiphany was recognizing that I dont hate products that are used in a corporate setting. I just hate products that arent built for users.

Farming the meatware

Euen Semple

When I am asked what the next big thing on the web will be I say patterns. We have increasingly been opening up and sharing stuff, which is in itself useful and interesting, but the real benefits start to come when we make sense of the patterns that this activity shows us. We know that Facebook makes its money out of the information we share and the patterns that that information makes. There is clearly huge benefit in seeing these patterns but huge risks as well.

Your phone doesn't have to be your enemy.

Euen Semple

By far the greatest use of my phone is reading books, followed by activities related to managing my work, then general productivity, and only then social media. Monitor my sleep patterns. I pay a premium for Apple products to not be the product. It has been interesting using the beta of iOS 12 for the past month or so and the new functionality that allows me to keep a track of my phone usage.

In Defense of Science

Clark Quinn

And that’s how we build products, services, and ultimately societies. For instance, our brains are wired to see patterns. I previously wrote in defense of cog psych. Here, I want to go broader. Not my usual topic, but… I feel the need to rail in defense of science.

Manufacturing: Where the Jobless Recovery Is Most Evident

Andy McAfee

The next two take the bloom off this rose by showing that the last time the country employed this few manufacturing workers was during the 1940s (after the WWII production surge ended): And that the percentage of workers employed by the manufacturing sector has been dropping steadily for well over half a century, and is now below 10%: But there has been something of a renaissance in US manufacturing output , just not in employment.

Experimentation: chocolate cakes and communicators | Full Circle Associates

Nancy White

What gets us moving beyond our customary habits and patterns? And what a wonderful and productive, chocolately surprise that can be. Viv McWaters on 29 Sep 2008 at 8:48 pm Hi Nancy Synchronicity does it for me every time – wakes me up when I start seeing a pattern. And what a wonderful and productive, chocolately surprise that can be.’

Wiki 100

Machine Learning and Knowledge Discovery

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

This is evidenced by the number of companies embracing AI as a key part of their strategies, the innovative, smart products and services they’re increasingly bringing to market, and the volume of articles being written on the subject. As new data is ingested, the system rewires itself based on whatever new patterns it now finds. To automate the process, the host can then use machine learning to discover common patterns or features among all the guests.

Harnessing the True Potential of Internet of Things Technology

John Hagel

Another popular early application involves using IoT technology to monitor the movement of parts and products in logistics chains. It used to be that, if you were in the product business, your goal was to sell the product, get the transaction done and book the revenue. In part, this was because once the product left your store or warehouse, you had very little visibility into how it was being used. What are product vendors doing on this front?