Networked individuals trump organizations

Harold Jarche

As hyperlinks subvert hierarchy , so does work fragmentation subvert organizations. In knowledge-based work the primary unit of value creation has shifted from the organization to the individual. A knowledge network in balance is founded on openness which enables transparency.

Building the network era organization

Harold Jarche

Part of the shift that organizations will have to make in the network era will be not only to add new dimensions, but to retrieve some old ones. The next shift is to a world of Networks, as succinctly described in David Ronfeldt’s TIMN theory.

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Why Organizations Don’t Learn

Jay Cross

Where organic, bottom-up meets corporate top-down. An article entitled Why Organizations Don’t Learn by Francesca Gino and Bradley Staats in the November 2015 issue of Harvard Business Review caught my eye. Networks of individuals instead of corporate monoliths.

designing the emergent organization

Harold Jarche

In The Rise of Emergent Organizations, Beth Comstock, Vice Chair at GE, cites five rules of thumb to guide organizational design for the emerging network era.

The post-hierarchical organization

Harold Jarche

The way we manage our organizations is largely ineffective for the complex challenges we face, whether driven by the environment, demographics, economics, or politics. But hierarchies are merely centralized networks. Distributed networks are in a state of perpetual Beta.

networked knowledge triad

Harold Jarche

There are three structures that exist in all organizations, with three different sources of power, and three types of leadership required for each structure. This model of structure, power, and leadership reflects how knowledge flows in a networked society and economy.

self-organization is the future

Harold Jarche

If we as a society think it is important that citizens are engaged, people are passionate about their work, and that we all contribute to making a better world, then we need to enable self-organization. Like democracy, self-organized teams are hard work.

Organizing Talent

Harold Jarche

It is a shifting value, as computers get smarter and the world gets networked. One way for Talent to survive in the long run is by working together in communities of practice, using social networks to find work and get work done.

Reinventing Organizations – Review

Harold Jarche

What is a “Teal Organization”? Frédéric Laloux, in Reinventing Organizations , uses a colour scheme, based on Integral Theory , to describe the historical development of human organizations: Red > Orange > Green > Teal.

implementing network learning

Harold Jarche

In the network era , developing the skills of a master artisan in every field of work will be critical for success. While getting work done collaboratively will continue to be of importance in all organizations, it will not be enough.

networked unmanagement

Harold Jarche

What are fundamental changes necessary to shift the dominant organizational model toward stronger networks and temporary, mutually negotiated hierarchies? Jarche’s Principles of Networked Unmanagement*.

self-organization and self-reflection

Harold Jarche

‘As we do not have bosses in our organization, we decided to have just one meeting every 6 months in order to share amongst us all where we are going as a company, defining a maximum of 3 primary objectives. How to Choose a Model of Self-organization , by @aarondignan.

Organize for Complexity

Harold Jarche

Neils Pflaeging read my ebook Seeking perpetual beta and said that “after reading the book one yearns for more from you about the right learning architecture, about how to develop organizations applying this thinking, about how to build learning programs and infrastructure.”

no organization is an island

Harold Jarche

Organizations are alive when people can exert their autonomy in ethical practice. Even progressive organizations often miss out on the latter, described by the authors as an, “ inherent tendency toward growth development and integrated functioning ”. The organization must be alive.

How organizations can thrive in the network era

Harold Jarche

I recently covered the BetaCodex Guide to Organizing for Complexity. The challenge of moving from a hierarchical to a network structure is a complete shift in how we have thought about organizations.

the network era trinity

Harold Jarche

Governance, business, and learning models are moving from centralized control to network-centric foundations. For instance, coalition governments are increasing in frequency, businesses are organizing in value networks, and collaborative and connected learning is becoming widespread.

Network thinking

Harold Jarche

Tweet Curtis Ogden at The Interaction Institute provides a very good summary of the differences between network-centric and hierarchy-centric thinking, called Network Thinking : Adaptability instead of control.

The Coherent Organization

Jay Cross

This post continues an ongoing conversation about The Coherent Organization. The article describes The Coherent Organization , the Internet Time Alliance ‘s shorthand for a company where individuals are aligned with the organizational mission and information flows from outside in and back again in ways that accelerate work. Harold made a key addition: Work teams collaborate; learning networks cooperate; communities of practice do both. Coherent Organization

network management update

Harold Jarche

You cannot manage a network. As networks become the dominant organizational form, the way we think about management has to change, as well as the way those in positions of authority try to influence others. Others need to see what we are contributing to the network.

the keystone of the intelligent organization

Harold Jarche

The intelligent enterprise has to be founded first and foremost on intelligent communication, which in the network era is much more than just passing information. The intelligent organization is based on a simple structure that has the flexibility to deal with complex situations.

Network Era Skills

Harold Jarche

It is only through innovative and contextual methods, the self-selection of the most appropriate tools and work conditions, and willing cooperation, that more productive work can be assured in the network era. In an organization, working out loud can take many forms.

Skills 142

enabling enterprise social networks

Harold Jarche

Mark Britz says that, “your organization already has an enterprise social network (hint, it’s people not technology). A platform just exposes it.” ” But it’s not not about the tools either, as in many cases the medium changes the message.

Organizing for diversity and complexity

Harold Jarche

It comes down to the fact that what we know and do inside our organizations is insufficient to address external complexity or to be innovative. Connecting the diversity of markets and society to the organization, instead of creating firewalls, is a major challenge for leadership today.

Networked Professional Development

Harold Jarche

It can sometimes be difficult to see oneself as a node in multiple networks, as opposed to a more conventional position within an organizational hierarchy. But network thinking can fundamentally change our view of hierarchical relationships.

principles of networked management

Harold Jarche

This is a good example of networked management, as opposed to scientific management (1911), which informed the past century of practice. Transparency is probably the biggest challenge for organizations today, and it can start with salary transparency.

Management in Networks

Harold Jarche

In networks, cooperation is more important than collaboration. They cannot see the potential of social networks for enabling sense-making and knowledge-sharing. organizing. But the new reality is that networks are the new companies.

learning in the network era

Harold Jarche

Here are some thoughts on personal and social learning in the network era. By extending the borders of work, through communities of practice and social networks, we can support social learning. Outside the organization we can make new connections without permission.

Leadership for the Network Era

Harold Jarche

The TIMN [Tribes + Institutions + Markets + Networks] model shows how society grew from a collection of tribes, added institutions, and later developed markets. The network era began with the advent of electric communications, though it is by no means completely established.

A guide to complexity and organizations

Harold Jarche

Via Jay Cross is this amazing synthesis – Organize for Complexity – of how complexity affects our work and the ways in which we can change our organizational structures to account for complexity, instead or adding more complication.

Social networks require ownership

Harold Jarche

So Gartner states that only 10% of social networking roll-outs succeed. The hard work begins after the software vendors have provided the initial training and the organization is on its own. Social media, and social networks, change the way we communicate.

cooperation for the network era

Harold Jarche

That’s why you see it in networks. Cooperation makes more sense as the term to describe working together in a networked and non-directed relationship. For example, Jérôme Delacroix also sees cooperation as the suitable term for what we do in networks [in French].

networks are the new companies

Harold Jarche

Economic value has been redistributed to creative workers, and then diffused through knowledge networks. In an interview with Stowe Boyd, Nilofer succinctly explains several of the pieces that must come together in structuring work in the network era.

Principles of Networked Unmanagement

Harold Jarche

In networks, cooperation trumps collaboration. As we shift to a networked economy, our organizational frameworks have to change. No one has the definitive answer any more but we can use the intelligence of our networks to make sense together and see how we can influence desired results.

5 Use Cases for a Corporate YouTube in Organizations

Dan Pontefract

Previously I’ve discussed the benefits and uses of micro-blogging , badging and virtual worlds inside an organization. Once you have video sharing in place, what are some of the effective ways in which you can utilize it within your organization?

network leadership = adapting to perpetual beta

Harold Jarche

Trust is the glue that holds creative organizations together, not rules and regulations. A similar approach can be developed for today’s networked organizations. Technology leads organizations. Organizations lead institutions.

Why it matters that networks in organizations and social systems are shifting to power-law distributions

Ross Dawson

Below is the video of the section of my presentation on Networks. Here is a summary of the points made in the video: * Networks are fundamental not just to our communications but to many aspects of our lives. There are many network topologies.

the core competency for network era work

Harold Jarche

It will take a new social contract between workers and organizations in order to create an optimally functioning enterprise. I have learned that it takes time to build a knowledge-sharing network and develop a sense-making discipline. Organizations do not learn, people do.

it’s about the network

Harold Jarche

Network thinking lets us scientifically understand the world around us as one of connections that shape observed phenomena, rather than as one where the intrinsic properties of people, genes, or particles determine outcomes. Network thinking comes by engaging in networked conversations.

Why predictions are dangerous and organizations must be well networked

Ross Dawson

” The article goes on to give my life history in brief, including the books I have written that have shaped my career, and describes how I often use scenario planning with major organizations engaging with the future.

The Hyper-social Organization – Review

Harold Jarche

The main premise of The Hyper-social Organization is that social media, connectivity and always-on technology are enabling what humans do naturally; to be very social. In a separate study, IDC estimated that only 20 percent of all content developed by the typical marketing department is actually used by the sales organization. ” Networks vs Channels: “Data and knowledge flow through channels, whereas networks allow knowledge to flow.” Tweet.