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Re-thinking Workplace Learning: extracting rather than adding

Charles Jennings

One clear finding presented was that: “t hose activities that are integrated into manager and employee workflow have the largest impact on employee performance, while those that are distinct events separate from the day-to-day job have less impact.” In other words if people have the opportunity to learn and develop as part of their work and they are supported by their manager, then learning will be much better transformed into measurable behavioural change and performance improvement.

Managing Learning?

Charles Jennings

Learning can only be managed by the individual in whose head the learning is occurring. Of course external factors – such as other people (especially your manager and your team), technology, prevailing culture, general ‘environmental’ factors, and a range of different elements – can support, facilitate, encourage, and help your learning occur faster, better, with greater impact and so on. But they can’t manage the learning process for you.

PKM 173

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The Best of Times, The Worst of Times: opportunities and challenges for the L&D profession

Charles Jennings

These are the words of Charles Dickens, 19th century English writer and social critic, writing in his epic novel set in England and France at the time leading up to the French Revolution. It really is the best of times and the worst of times for learning professionals. The findings make salutary reading for any CLO, learning leader or L&D professional. Stick with a one-eyed focus on designing and managing ‘learning’ and irrelevance and oblivion will surely follow.

Survey 181

Real learning – let’s not confuse it with completing templated exercises

Charles Jennings

I read a piece written by Kate Graham of e2train on Thursday and it started me thinking about the ‘real learning versus managed learning’ debate. We shouldn’t confuse what L&D/Training departments spend a lot of their time on with real learning.