PKM: the basic unit of social business

Harold Jarche

True collaborative networks do not rely so much on teams than on individuals, as B. Instead of focusing on teams and communities, we must concentrate our efforts in providing workers with the right resources and knowledge to build their own connections. It is more like a social network.

PKM 252

Why do I need KM?

Harold Jarche

” This illuminates an observation made by Thierry deBaillon , which I have often quoted, “The basic unit of social business technology is personal knowledge management, not collaborative workspaces.” The results of PKM can then be used in collaborative work.

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Engaging Knowledge Artisans

Harold Jarche

Every organization today is trying to address the changing nature of work, driven by rapid technological change, and made more complex by global changes in economics, politics, and resources. But what about our structures that organize how people work together? PKM Wirearchy

digital transformation skills

Harold Jarche

Oscar Berg has further developed his digital collaboration canvas that describes nine capabilities required for collaborative knowledge work. The foundation for these skills is a democratic organization based on loose hierarchies and strong networks.

Skills 278

Learning is the work

Harold Jarche

Work is learning and learning is the work. Because the nature of work is changing. For example, automation is replacing most routine work. That leaves customized work, which requires initiative, creativity and passion. Share to inspire through your work.

The Seek > Sense > Share Framework

Harold Jarche

Simple standards facilitated with a light touch, enables knowledge workers to capture, interpret and share their knowledge. Personal knowledge management is a set of processes, individually constructed, to help each of us make sense of our world and work more effectively.

working collaboratively and learning cooperatively

Harold Jarche

Learning and development (L&D) practices reflect this priority on error reduction.But knowledge work, especially creative work, is not mere production. Insights usually come while working, resting, and playing — not while undergoing formal education or training.

finding community

Harold Jarche

Many work teams today are distributed geographically, culturally, or in different time zones. But trust is required before real knowledge-sharing can happen. However, new ideas come from diverse networks with structural holes, often outside the organization.

mastery and models

Harold Jarche

Personal Knowledge Mastery. These disciplines have influenced my professional work which is based on individuals taking control of their learning and professional development and actively engaging in social networks and communities of practice. It is a key aspect of PKM.

PKM 202

Social learning is for human work

Harold Jarche

This past week I came across the theme of the changing nature of work several times. As computers transcend many human capabilities and work is dehumanized , we must focus on the skills and abilities where humans excel beyond any imaginable machine capability. SocialLearning Work

The connected leader

Harold Jarche

They made an effort to share their knowledge and expertise more widely. . Leadership, like culture, is an emergent property of people working together. For example, trust only emerges if knowledge is shared and diverse points of view are accepted.

PKM 280

Connected leadership is not the status quo

Harold Jarche

As organizations, markets, and society become networked, complexity in all human endeavors increases. The connected workplace is all about understanding networks, modelling networked learning, and strengthening networks. In networks, anyone can show leadership, not just those appointed by management. A guiding principle for connected organizational design is for loose hierarchies and strong networks. Better networks are better for business.

Fluctuating support networks

Harold Jarche

Judith passed on a couple of papers which I found most interesting, as she has looked deeply into the theory behind the need for what I would describe as social learning networks. Judith uses the term, “fluctuating support networks&#. Adopting the basic social process of rehumanizing as a conceptual framework may assist managers and human resource professionals in developing organizational strategies that support a broader humanistic paradigm.

Favourite Workplace Learning Blogs

Harold Jarche

I don’t like creating “Top 50″ lists so here are my current favourite sources of information and knowledge about learning, especially for the networked business environment. Social Media in Learning by Jane Hart (UK). Anecdote AU: A blog focused on “putting stories to work&#. ELSUA ES: Luis Suarez talks about knowledge management, community building, social computing and living in a world without e-mail [a very good thing].

Social Learning, Complexity and the Enterprise

Harold Jarche

Tweet The social learning revolution has only just begun. Corporations that understand the value of knowledge sharing, teamwork, informal learning and joint problem solving are investing heavily in collaboration technology and are reaping the early rewards. ~ Social learning.

Learning in Complexity

Harold Jarche

StevenBJohnson - How research works in an age of social networks (or at least how it works for me) [highly recommended post #PKM]. Very few of the key links came from the traditional approach of reading a work and then following the citations included in the endnotes. The reading was still critical, of course, but the connective branches turned out to lie in the social layer of commentary outside of the work.

The Evolving Social Organization

Harold Jarche

Innovation abounds in the early stages and knowledge capitalization is aided by a common vision of the business. Current management wisdom – based on Robin Dunbar’s research ; the size of military units through history; and the work of management experts such as Tom Peters – considers the ideal size of an organization to be around 150 people. However, knowledge, and the acquisition of new knowledge, are still key factors for innovation and effectiveness.