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  • JAY CROSS'S INFORMAL LEARNING  |  MONDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2007
    [Knowledge Management] Informal Learning Blog » Come together
  • JAY CROSS'S INFORMAL LEARNING  |  THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 2008
    [Knowledge Management] Informal Learning Blog » Big questionable predictions for 2008
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] Don’t worry, nobody can steal your knowledge
    Why do I share my knowledge? I could not share my knowledge with you, if I wanted. There is no such thing as knowledge transfer. Data and information can be transferred, but not knowledge. So what is the idea behind behind personal knowledge management and the Seek-Sense-Share framework if knowledge cannot be shared in the first place? For me, PKM is a set of practices I can use to better articulate my knowledge.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] PKM Book Alpha Version
    Regular readers know that I am working on putting all of my thoughts on personal knowledge management together, as part of my PKM book project. In the spirit of sharing, and learning out loud, I have produced an Alpha version (it’s not advanced enough to even be considered Beta yet). In my last PKM book update I mentioned I was using a WordPress plug-in to organize the writing.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2015
    [Knowledge Management] my pkm story
    It has been over 10 years that I have examined, practiced, and developed models for personal knowledge management/mastery. I started down the path of personal knowledge mastery in 2004, inspired by Dave Pollard , Denham Gray , and others. “To To a great extend PKM [personal knowledge management] is about shifting responsibility for learning and knowledge sharing from a company to individuals and this is the greatest challenge for both sides.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] It starts with capturing knowledge
    Capture Knowledge. Capturing knowledge is the foundation, and drives value up the chain, enabling sharing of knowledge and the ability to take action on that knowledge. As Dave Gray wrote in The Connected Company , capturing tacit knowledge is tough: The learning challenge for the company comes from the dynamic relationship between the two forms of knowledge. For individuals: Practice personal knowledge management.
  • EUEN SEMPLE  |  SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] Facebook vs your IT department
    But if we're talking about the ill-conceived, badly designed, overengineered office systems that soak up the lives of so many people faffing about creating all those documents that take days to write, but no one reads, and that are stored in expensive knowledge management systems never to be found again - then I would disagree.?
  • JANE HART  |  FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] 12 features of supporting social collaboration in the workplace
    1 – moving from a focus on organising and managing training (which includes e-learning and blended learning) FOR others, to helping individuals and teams address their OWN performance problems. 3 – helping people work and learn effectively in this networked era (and within a social business), by developing their own Personal Knowledge Management (PKM) skills. See my article The Role of the Enterprise Learning Community Manager for more about this role.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] The PKM value-add
    During my online conversation ( recording on YouTube ) with Jane Hart yesterday, we discussed personal knowledge management (PKM) and one very important aspect, in my opinion, is the need for active sense-making. The knowledge gained from PKM is an emergent property of all its activities. Merely tagging an article does not create knowledge. Knowledge – connecting information to experience (know what, know who, know how). Management – getting things done.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2013
    [Knowledge Management] Three types of KM
    In an organizational knowledge sharing framework , I put together several ideas to show how knowledge could be shared and codified. As I explain this to others I realize that these ideas go against many established assumptions about knowledge in organizations. For example, knowledge management is not a software system, but really three processes that are conducted in parallel and support each other; namely Big KM , Little KM and PKM [ Patti Anklam ].
  • EUEN SEMPLE  |  FRIDAY, JUNE 1, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] Knowledge Harvesting
    I have often made fun of the knowledge management phrase "knowledge harvesting" as it sounds like some sort of cerebral milking machine, sucking the good stuff from staff's skulls and leaving the empty husks discarded outside the office door.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2013
    [Knowledge Management] Create conversation spaces
    Personal knowledge management is akin to pre-curation. Getting all the necessary parties involved in workplace conversations can enhance knowledge-sharing and contribute to greater diversity of ideas, a necessity for innovation. Curation is more than integration , writes Rick Segal in Forbes [via Robin Good ]. Segal discusses how marketing is about curating all the conversations around a subject.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  SUNDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2011
    [Knowledge Management] The Hyper-social Organization – Review
    The authors on knowledge management: Of course, one of the big challenges for companies is that, unlike information or data, knowledge does not flow easily, as it relies on long-term trust-based relationships. ” Networks vs Channels: “Data and knowledge flow through channels, whereas networks allow knowledge to flow.” Tweet.
  • JANE HART  |  TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] PKM is our part of the social learning contract
    PKM is also a key skill of being an effective autonomous learner – as we can see from the many individuals who are already organizing and managing their own personal learning strategies in the organization – and consequently a key aspect of BYOL (Bring Your Own Learning). Yesterday, Harold Jarche shared the image on the right, in his post To learn, we must do. For me this is spot on.
  • BETH KANTER  |  THURSDAY, JUNE 30, 2016
    [Knowledge Management] How the Nonprofit Sector Can Share What We Learn and Why We Should
    Note from Beth: I’ve been a big believer in shared knowledge and learning for the sector. IssueLab has been working for ten years to apply the age-old knowledge management question, “what if I knew what others know?” You might call what we’re doing Big Knowledge, or Big (Qualitative) Data. Our sector—foundations, nonprofits, and university-based research centers—is producing knowledge at a rapid clip.
  • JANE HART  |  THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] “Learning the new” vs “Learning the old”
    Currently this is where corporate e-learning focuses its efforts - delivering online learning experiences for its people to acquire existing bodies of knowledge or skill – it’s all about learning the old. It’s not about waiting for someone to come along to teach us this new knowledge or new skills; but rather to continuously learn for ourselves.
  • JAY CROSS  |  TUESDAY, AUGUST 23, 2011
    [Knowledge Management] It’s not about the content
    It reminded me of the initial Knowledge Management fiasco where bright MBAs assembled well-written but irrelevant platitudes and stuffed them into databases nobody ever visited. Executives who can fork over $60K for a management program are more likely to be after tacit knowledge than explicit knowledge, and by definition, you don’t find tacit knowledge in a database.
  • MARTIJN LINSSEN  |  TUESDAY, APRIL 8, 2014
    [Knowledge Management] Waking up.
    Nevertheless, in my narrow field of knowledge management, for specific firms, something interesting is happening. ’ They are realizing that humans are not resources, information is not knowledge, and processes are fundamentally flawed guesses about the future. We have crafted entire industries and technologies to ‘manage *’ where * equals ‘knowledge,’ ‘information,’ content,’ ‘innovation,’ etc.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  THURSDAY, MAY 31, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] The learning organization: an often-described, but seldom-observed phenomenon
    The role of managers should be to manage the system, not the individual functions. The real barrier to systemic change, such as becoming a learning organization, is command & control management. Knowledge, Senge said, is the capacity for effective action (know how) and it is the only aspect of knowledge that really matters in business and life. Even team-based knowledge comes and goes. 2) The only knowledge that can be managed is our own.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2016
    [Knowledge Management] Group KM
    PKMastery is an essential discipline, especially for knowledge artisans. In order to collaborate, more structure is necessary, as well as agreed-upon rules for sharing knowledge. Group Knowledge Management (KM) takes PKMastery to the next level: getting things done. Group KM promotes groups to make decisions given the knowledge they have at the time, but subsequently learning from each decision.
  • DAVE SNOWDEN  |  WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2011
    [Knowledge Management] The ineffable, the inexpiable & the inexpicable
    The initial vehicle for that was knowledge management which was in the early stage of its hype cycle and I suddenly found myself on the conference circuit, and enjoying it if I am honest with myself. In the early days it was all about taxonomies, making tacit knowledge explicit and implementing a Lotus Notes system to create Communities of Practice.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2011
    [Knowledge Management] Collective sense-making
    The big shift for me in past decade has been in weaving a network that brings me diversity of opinions and depth of knowledge. I look for experts who share their knowledge or act as human-powered content aggregators, selecting quality information and discarding the crap. Knowledge in a networked society is different from what many of us grew up with in the pre-Internet days. Like electricity, knowledge is both particles and current, or stock and flow.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  MONDAY, AUGUST 27, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] Please tell me about your PKM
    During one of our conversations in a local café, Jon suggested that in wirearchies, personal knowledge management (PKM) could become the new resumé. How would you begin to look at the following problem, which is out of your normal scope of work … Describing how we stay actively engaged in our learning might be a better indicator of future performance, in a world where many answers do not lie in the past, but in how we manage to make connections with the present.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  WEDNESDAY, MAY 23, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] It’s all about networks
    Encouraging workplace practices like personal knowledge management is a start. Nurturing Creativity is now a management responsibility. Network Thinking : One major challenge in helping organizations improve collaboration and knowledge-sharing is getting people to see themselves as nodes in various networks, with different types of relationships between them. It’s all about networks. Understanding networks that is.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 2014
    [Knowledge Management] What have we learned so far?
    What have we learned so far about personal knowledge mastery? Personal Knowledge Mastery ( PKM ): A set of processes, individually constructed, to help each of us make sense of our world and work more effectively. Exercises such as network mapping are combined with the narration of work, network weaving, and how these can enable better knowledge connections. Personal Knowledge Management is not linear.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2008
    [Knowledge Management] Harold Jarche » Source?
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2008
    [Knowledge Management] Harold Jarche » Advice for the Training Department
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  WEDNESDAY, JUNE 7, 2006
    [Knowledge Management] Harold Jarche » PKM revisited
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  TUESDAY, AUGUST 29, 2006
    [Knowledge Management] Harold Jarche » My PKM System
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  MONDAY, APRIL 30, 2007
    [Knowledge Management] Harold Jarche » Blog Comment Tracking
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  THURSDAY, MAY 1, 2014
    [Knowledge Management] Organize for Complexity
    We call this “disciplined practice” Fads like business analytics, knowledge management, and big data will never make organizations fit for complexity. This is why I now call PKM: Personal Knowledge Mastery ; to separate it from much of the traditional practice of knowledge management. The book simplifies years of research and management practice and presents a lucid set of working examples, guidelines, and models that can be understood by all.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014
    [Knowledge Management] Ten Years, Ten Thoughts
    The mainstream application of knowledge management and learning management over the past few decades was mostly wrong; we over-managed information, knowledge and learning because it was easy to do. Because it is so difficult to represent our knowledge to others, we have to make every effort to continuously share it. Stories are the glue, holding information together in some semblance of order, for our brains to process into knowledge.
  • JAY CROSS  |  SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2011
    [Knowledge Management] Luis Suarez, Dion Hinchcliffe, and Kevin Wheeler
    Luis Suarez is an IBMer with a passion for everything to do with knowledge management. His interest is in real knowledge management, the field that includes knowledge sharing, collaboration, expertise location, content management, online facilitation, and building communities. He is the go-to guy in talent management. I take my role as curator of Working Smarter Daily seriously.
  • JANE HART  |  FRIDAY, APRIL 27, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] The key to informal learning is autonomy
    Most have simply tried to manage informal learning – in an LMS or other learning platform – usually as part of a blended learning solution – believing it is simply about providing training in the form of informational rather than instructional resources. For me, however, the key to informal learning is where the locus of control lies; so if someone plans, organises and manages what you learn, then this is not informal learning.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 2013
    [Knowledge Management] Making sense of complexity and innovation
    Knowledge Leadership in the Era of Convergence - via @JonHusband. In an environment where speed, access, and tools allow workers to seamlessly collaborate across time zones, store massive amounts of data, and crowdsource the answers to difficult organizational issues, organizations that trend toward openness in the knowledge management arena will be better able to use new technologies and react to cultural and business changes.
  • DAVE SNOWDEN  |  SATURDAY, MAY 13, 2017
    [Knowledge Management] … and nearer to the Dust
    One of the deeply negative aspects of the knowledge management period of a decade or more ago was the gross confusion of information with knowledge. Now I think it was meant to be a statement about the value of employees but it became a sort of iconic justification for the reduction of knowledge to information, a focus on documents, best practice, taxonomies and the like. Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge?
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14, 2010
    [Knowledge Management] Sense-making glossary
    Many of the definitions are framed around report writing but these can easily be expanded into the broader areas of personal knowledge management or personal learning environments. PARC offers a glossary of quite useful sense-making terms. Sense-making is what the second part of the Seek-Sense-Share PKM model is about.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011
    [Knowledge Management] Making sense of our world
    Tweet I define Personal Knowledge Management (PKM) as a set of processes, individually constructed, to help each of us make sense of our world, work more effectively and contribute to society. George Siemens has made this rather succinct statement about knowledge: When I externalize something, it’s information. When someone connects it in some manner, it becomes knowledge. Knowledge is essentially relatedness/connectedness.
  • ROSS DAWSON  |  TUESDAY, APRIL 5, 2011
    [Knowledge Management] What is the future of the Learning & Development department?
    I haven’t spent a lot of time explicitly in the learning space, though my experience from the mid-1990s in the knowledge management arena means I have long considered many of the same issues as those in learning. Creating and providing access to collections of digital artifacts, ranging from documents to meeting archives to videos, long dominated knowledge management.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2011
    [Knowledge Management] Managing engagement
    He discusses the three main branches of the family: Communication, Knowledge Management, and Monitoring & Evaluation. There’s even good old PKM : The little brother PKM (personal knowledge management) was not taken seriously for a long time but he is really a whiz kid and has given a lot of people confidence that perhaps his branch of the family is better off betting on him, at least partly. You cannot manage engagement if no one needs to be managed.
  • DAVE SNOWDEN  |  SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] this terrible pain in all the diodes down my left side.
    is dead, but that knowledge management as a strategic movement has served its time and is now irretrievably seen as a sub-function of IT. So, as I think its time to move on from knowledge management per se, so I think it may be time to move on from the technology v people debate which was an essential part of the knowledge management period.
  • JANE HART  |  SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013
    [Knowledge Management] Seek-Sense-Share Mini Online Workshop
    The first mini online workshop at the Connected Knowledge Lab takes place from 8-19 July and is led by Harold Jarche. This mini online workshop will help you understand the Personal Knowledge Management (PKM) framework as a model for taking control of your professional development. Although we refer to these events as “workshops” they are [.]. Social learning
  • DAVE SNOWDEN  |  TUESDAY, MARCH 22, 2011
    [Knowledge Management] The prepared mind
    Knowledge management systems have to be fragmented and experiential as anything more structured cannot handle the levels of uncertainty inherent in the future. One of the key points I have been making in the new seminar (and a few keynotes) over the last week is that resilience requires not just a prepared mind, but also a prepared organisation. That means building network connectivity and cross silo deployment capability before it is needed not during the event.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 2013
    [Knowledge Management] As the world keeps churning, work today is all about learning
    The chapter on Clarity was directly aligned with my work on personal knowledge management. It is about seeking information and knowledge and distilling it so that you can make sense of it and then it is ready to be shared. The title of this post is what Dan Pink, in his book To Sell is Human , would call a rhyming pitch. He also discusses the question pitch , and I followed his recommendation in the Pitch chapter and developed my own.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] PKM Book Update 1
    The PKM Workshops have provided me with great feedback on how personal knowledge management is understood and used by others. I have been very pleasantly surprised at how well my request to fund the PKM Book Project has been taken up by the community at large. So far, 30 people have sponsored at the basic $10 level.
  • DAVID GURTEEN  |  MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 2009
    [Knowledge Management] Business cases are a waste of time!
    By David Gurteen Knowledge managers are always asking how they can obtain support for a KM project by demonstrating the ROI especially as the measuring the ROI of a KM initiative is so difficult. This article by Susan Cramm on the Harvard Business Publishing website is about IT projects but I think is even more applicable to KM projects.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2014
    [Knowledge Management] Complex knowledge
    Last week I spent several hours each day, for four consecutive days, trying to share complex knowledge. I had my understanding of communities of practice, personal knowledge management, leadership, and innovation that I wanted to share. My friend and colleague Christian Renard had his knowledge about marketing, business, and digital power to share. From the time I was picked up at the Gare du Nord we began to share our knowledge through many conversations.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  MONDAY, JULY 4, 2016
    [Knowledge Management] human networks connect through empathy
    To a great extent PKM [personal knowledge management] is about shifting responsibility for learning and knowledge sharing from a company to individuals and this is the greatest challenge for both sides. Creativity, learning or desire to help others cannot be controlled, so knowledge workers need to be intrinsically motivated to deliver quality results. We are only as good as our networks. Our decisions reflect the diversity of our networks.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013
    [Knowledge Management] Why PKM?
    This helps me get my ideas together, in a more manageable format than a full-length paper. Knowledge Management for Decision Memories. Lilia Efimova , the original inspiration for my PKM practices, has said that the main problem with personal knowledge management is that we need to take time now, in order to invest in the future. Have you ever tried to find something you saw recently on the Net but don’t remember where you found it?
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] The right information is not enough
    I would like to contrast this with a statement made by Dave Snowden that I noted in negotiating between chaos and project management. It has happened before with knowledge management and learning management systems. Each person is the indivisible unit of knowledge work. If the aim is to improve organizational knowledge, then people have to take time to make sense of it.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2011
    [Knowledge Management] Sense-making through conversation
    Tweet One of our clients referred me to a post by Nick Milton on another great Boston square that pulls “apart the KM world on dimensions of Knowledge Push and Knowledge Pull (which you might call “Sharing” and “seeking”), and the dimensions of Explicit and Tacit. We know that conversation is the main way that tacit knowledge gets shared. Finally, we share new, explicit knowledge artifacts which then grow our bodies of knowledge.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  MONDAY, MARCH 7, 2011
    [Knowledge Management] Finding the time for networked learning
    Tweet A survey of small and medium sized businesses (SMB) showed workers spend about half their day on unproductive taks: Knowledge Workers are among the largest staff component in a typical SMB. SMB Knowledge Workers spend an estimated 36 percent of their time trying to. Approximately 14 percent of SMB Knowledge Workers’ time is spent: Duplicating information (e.g. Managing unwanted communications (e.g.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] Idea management requires shared power
    Nancy Dixon discusses The Three Eras of Knowledge Management , an excellent read on how lead organizations are using idea management. Convening is the skill and practice of bringing groups together to develop understanding of complex issues, create new knowledge and spur innovation. Transparency includes the willingness of management to say, “I don’t know” and therefore to employ the organization’s collective knowledge.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  THURSDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2013
    [Knowledge Management] Best of Friday’s Finds 2013
    Managing is a waste of time. Knowledge Leadership in the Era of Convergence – via @JonHusband. In an environment where speed, access, and tools allow workers to seamlessly collaborate across time zones, store massive amounts of data, and crowdsource the answers to difficult organizational issues, organizations that trend toward openness in the knowledge management arena will be better able to use new technologies and react to cultural and business changes.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] Three Principles for Net Work
    For knowledge workers, there is diminishing value in standardized work, as it will be either automated or outsourced over time. Standardized work usually falls into simple or complicated knowledge domains. According to the Cynefin knowledge management framework, developed by Dave Snowden, in the simple domain, “the relationship between cause and effect is obvious to all” while in the complicated domain, “the relationship between cause and effect requires analysis”.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 2011
    [Knowledge Management] PKM Updated
    Using a Seek-Sense-Share framework (à la personal knowledge management), pick one or more web platforms on which to practise critical thinking. Tweet Here are four main processes that can be used in developing critical thinking skills using web tools (click image to enlarge). Critical Thinking Process. Web Tools & Strategies. Observe & Study. Use an aggregator (feed reader) to keep track of online conversations Follow interesting people on Twitter.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 2013
    [Knowledge Management] Institutional Memory
    In The Future of Knowledge Management , he says that the main problem with KM systems is that they do not copy how real people think and that unlike a person, a “KM system simply gets slower as a result of more information” He proposes creating software scripts to organize information, but these must be capable of self-modification. Schank concludes: There is a lot of knowledge in an enterprise that can be used to organize new knowledge that is coming in.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2016
    [Knowledge Management] not working, out loud
    I am a proponent of working out loud and see it as an essential connector between personal knowledge mastery and organizational knowledge management, as it helps make organizational knowledge explicit. I began work on a new volume on personal knowledge mastery. John Stepper has recently advanced the idea of working out loud with his book on the subject. Many others are now practicing it: #workoutloud. Image: working in perpetual beta.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2014
    [Knowledge Management] becoming collectively smarter
    People need to learn and work in networks, shifting their hierarchical position from teacher to learner, or from manager to contributor. It is becoming obvious in many fields that we are only as good as our knowledge networks. Personal Knowledge Management/Mastery is but one way to address the need to keep up with the scientific revolutions around us. But like e-learning and knowledge management, PKM is at risk of becoming a technology to buy and consume.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  MONDAY, APRIL 15, 2013
    [Knowledge Management] The Connected Workplace
    But both require greater implicit knowledge. Implicit knowledge, unlike explicit knowledge, is difficult to codify and standardize. Implicit knowledge is best developed through conversations and social relationships. Social networks can enable better and faster knowledge feedback for people who trust each and share their knowledge. Working smarter in the future workplace starts by organizing to embrace networks, manage complexity, and build trust.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] “you simply can’t train people to be social!”
    Tweet Over the past year I have been working on change initiatives to improve collaboration and knowledge-sharing with two large companies, one of them a multinational. The low visibility activities link directly to personal knowledge management (PKM) skills, based on the process of Seeking information & knowledge; making Sense of it; and Sharing higher value information with others. Creating a supportive social environment is management’s responsibility.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] Pulling informal learning
    Take a look at these 8 demand-side knowledge management principles by Nick Milton. People don’t pay attention to knowledge until they actually need it. People value knowledge that they request more highly than knowledge that is unsolicited. People won’t use knowledge, unless they trust its provenance. Knowledge has to be reviewed in the user’s own context before it can be received. Knowledge has to be adapted before it can be adopted.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  MONDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] Coherence in complexity
    The same is happening to our models for management and “change management”, as if we could manage change in the first place. Systems, such as enterprise social network tools , can assist “net work” practices like the narration of work and personal knowledge management. So while change cannot be managed, per se , organizations can be structured in ways to be more resilient to change.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  MONDAY, JULY 22, 2013
    [Knowledge Management] An organizational knowledge-sharing framework
    There is a lot of knowledge in an organization, some of it easy to codify (capture), and much (most) of it difficult to do so. Understanding how best to commit resources for knowledge-sharing should be in some kind of a decision-making framework that is easy for anyone to understand. Outputs are quite explicit, while expertise is mostly implicit knowledge. Networks can be mapped, and are therefore explicit, but interpreting them requires implicit knowledge.
  • CLARK QUINN  |  TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2015
    [Knowledge Management] 70:20:10 and the Learning Curve
    Note that this assumes a good formal learning design, not rote information and knowledge test!) Still, you could think of accreting the cognitive and explicitly semantic knowledge, then restructuring that into coarse skills that don’t require as much conscious effort, until it becomes a matter of tuning a finely automated skill. My colleague Charles Jennings recently posted on the value of autonomous learning (worth reading!),
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2015
    [Knowledge Management] leadership is learning
    This fundamental shift in focus is a prime example of the major organizational change required from both our education systems to our management models, as we transition into a networked creative economy. Help the Network Make Better Decisions — Managers should see themselves as servant leaders. Improve insights — Too often, management only focuses on reducing errors, but it is insight that drives innovation. This is a network management responsibility.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2009
    [Knowledge Management] PKM: our part of the social learning contract
    With social learning, everyone contributes to collective knowledge and this in turn can make organizations and society more effective in dealing with problems. How does personal knowledge management relate to social learning? The whole is greater than the sum of the parts as we build on the knowledge of others. As knowledge workers or citizens, PKM is our part of the social learning contract. Image Source: iKnowlej Personal Knowledge Management.
  • DAVE SNOWDEN  |  THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2011
    [Knowledge Management] … forever blunt and merciless
    Its not enough to manage the information system, you have to manage the ecology of knowledge flow within an organisation. Managing for exaption requires a degree of mess , something that the sick staggered will find it difficult to comprehend. Thirdly , knowledge management is all about communication and that doesn't just meant the top down focus that is all too common place, although it does permit it.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 2015
    [Knowledge Management] serendipitous drip-fed learning
    My knowledge of biology is quite limited. We share an interest in knowledge management and PKM , but Shaun has a background in agricultural science of which I know nothing. More of my knowledge and understanding is coming through my network. First I develop a relationship with the person, in understanding perspectives, depth of knowledge, and consistency. If you want to learn something about a field you know little about, what do you do?
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2013
    [Knowledge Management] Only people can let knowledge flow
    The knowledge sharing paradox is that while sharing our knowledge is good for the organization, each individual has to see a personal benefit as well. The more the enterprise directs knowledge-sharing, the less likely it will happen. Helen Blunden neatly sums up what can happen to those who freely share their knowledge. Knowledge flows when individuals actively engage in teams, communities, and networks by working and learning out loud.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  MONDAY, APRIL 30, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] How blogging changed my life for the better
    My blog is a key part of my professional development and essential to my personal knowledge management processes. I guess I could be described as a hardcore blogger, as I’ve been writing here for over eight years. So I’m going to respond to Hugh MacLeod’s question about the importance of blogging to me. Like I said many times before, for those of us crazy enough to take it seriously, blogging matters, so does freedom, that’s why I wrote the book.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2014
    [Knowledge Management] knowledge is personal
    Knowledge management, for me, is personal. A big conceit of the knowledge management (KM) field is that knowledge can be transferred, but unlike information or data, it cannot. Knowledge is personal. While knowledge cannot really be transferred, our experiences can be shared. They are a glimpse into others’ knowledge, more nuanced than any other communication medium. Explicit knowledge (decisions, events, procedures, etc.)
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2011
    [Knowledge Management] experience-sharing vs information-sharing
    “the single most important management skill to develop is a tolerance for ambiguity” ~ @TimKastelle. How does the traditional world view of knowledge management fit in the world of social business? Knowledge Management = experience-sharing NOT information-sharing – Knoco Stories. In most of the training courses I run, I ask the question “where does knowledge come from?” Ask people “where does knowledge come from”?
  • JANE HART  |  WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] Summer Camp starts Monday 16 July
    Personal Knowledge Management (PKM). The online Summer Camp at the Social Learning Centre runs 16 July – 17 August and is led by Jane Hart and Harold Jarche. Learning is changing. Learning professionals need practical tools and techniques to integrate work and learning while adapting to an increasingly complex environment. Our Summer Camp provides an opportunity to learn with peers and gain some of the essential skills needed to support learning in the networked world.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2013
    [Knowledge Management] Pushing and Pulling Tacit Knowledge
    The knowledge gained is an emergent property of all sense-making activities. These are examples of Pushing knowledge, adding value for oneself, that may in the future be useful for others. Knowledge can be Pulled by those seeking answers. Nancy Dixon describes how Rob Cross and Lee Sproull examined tacit knowledge-sharing in a large consulting firm. Sense-making is where the real personal value of PKM lies.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013
    [Knowledge Management] Future of work is complex, implicit and intangible
    The relationship between intangibles and tangibles reminds me of the implicit/explicit knowledge continuum. The explicit/tangible side is easier to measure, so that is where most management methods have concentrated their efforts. With the increasing complexity that networks bring, implicit knowledge-sharing becomes more important as well, but this is often ignored by both training and knowledge management programs.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2015
    [Knowledge Management] you are only as good as your network
    This involved complex knowledge about information technology, organizational behaviour, knowledge management, and social media. But I put my faith in my knowledge networks and communities of practice where I had been involved for the past 14 years. But when we are faced with a complex problem it’s too late to start engaging in a community of practice or building a knowledge network. ConnectedEnterprise Management Work
  • DAVE SNOWDEN  |  SATURDAY, MAY 6, 2017
    [Knowledge Management] False dichotomies, reality avoidance
    All the things that went wrong with Knowledge Management at the turn of the Century. Providing structure for the mess of complexity through heuristics, portfolio management of parallel safe-to-fail experiments and the like has always been a part of what we do at Cognitive Edge, but starting to look at managed transitions between domains – in both directions – is a necessary step.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2013
    [Knowledge Management] Learning is the work
    It puts into question most of our management frameworks that require detailed analysis before we take action. Emergent practices are dependent on the cooperation of all workers (and management) as well as the free flow of knowledge. Work in complex situations requires a greater percentage of implicit knowledge, which cannot be easily codified. Research shows that sharing complex knowledge requires strong interpersonal relationships. not being managed).
  • DAVID GURTEEN  |  WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009
    [Knowledge Management] LinkedIn KM Groups
    There is no KM directory but here are most of the Groups (in no particular order) that I have found: Gurteen Knowledge Community. CKO (Chief Knowledge Officers) Forum. For Knowledge Persons. Knowledge Management. Knowledge Management Experts. Knowledge Management for Legal Professionals. Knowledge Management Professional Society (KMPro). Knowledge Managers. SLA Knowledge Management Division.
  • JANE HART  |  MONDAY, MARCH 11, 2013
    [Knowledge Management] Supporting self-managed team learning in the organisation
    But what these both have in common is that they are still a “ managed learning ” process. In this and my next post I am going to look at self-managed learning in an organization, and how that might be supported and scaffolded. Today I’m going to look at “supporting self-managed team learning”, and next time I will consider ”supporting self-managed personal and professional learning”.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  TUESDAY, JUNE 12, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] In the beginning was the blog
    ” As we start the Personal Knowledge Management workshop this week, the topic of blogs has already come up. Chris Brogan, co-author of Trust Agents , has a number of insights on blogging and engaging online. I have been blogging here for eight years and before that experimented with a few other blogs. I thought I’d compare my experience with Brogan’s recent 21 point primer for blogging.
  • JANE HART  |  THURSDAY, JANUARY 31, 2013
    [Knowledge Management] Are you supporting new fashioned learning in the workplace?
    But let’s be clear, even when newer social and informal approaches are added to this old model that let you learn things a little differently, if your learning experience has in any way been organized (and/or managed) by someone else , this is still “old fashioned” learning. It is a very useful approach for getting you up to scratch quickly on a topic with an existing body of knowledge or wisdom. New domains of knowledge are appearing which have yet to be structured and organized.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2013
    [Knowledge Management] Becoming explicit
    Our old technology — paper — gave us an idea of knowledge that said that knowledge comes from experts who are filtered, printed, and then it’s settled, because that’s how books work. In order to let knowledge get as big as our new medium allows, we have to recognize that knowledge comes from all of us (including experts), it is to be linked, shared, discussed, argued about, made fun of, and is never finished and done.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2013
    [Knowledge Management] Make it relevant
    Spend more effort on getting influential people, especially senior management, to model the behavior. This is why I am not the most popular person amongst LMS vendors , as I believe the underlying principle of learning management systems is in direct conflict with collaborative and cooperative work. Changing the way that daily work is done, how knowledge is shared, and what gets communicated, are the important things to focus on in improving knowledge work.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] Barriers to PKM
    A few weeks ago I asked my extended online network, “ What do you think is the biggest fear/need/barrier when it comes to adopting personal knowledge management (PKM) as a practice? ” Finding someone to talk to about PKM was a common response, as was the observation that management’s perception is often that not everyone has the same level of ability to do PKM sufficiently well.
  • CHARLES JENNINGS  |  MONDAY, APRIL 1, 2013
    [Knowledge Management] Managing Learning?
    Learning can only be managed by the individual in whose head the learning is occurring. Of course external factors – such as other people (especially your manager and your team), technology, prevailing culture, general ‘environmental’ factors, and a range of different elements – can support, facilitate, encourage, and help your learning occur faster, better, with greater impact and so on. But they can’t manage the learning process for you.
  • DAVE SNOWDEN  |  TUESDAY, MAY 2, 2017
    [Knowledge Management] Small actions to create meaning
    The last few days have seen one of the periodic retweeting of a three year old post I wrote with the title SAFe the Infantilisation of Management. I probably stoked the fires a little by repeating a tweet of similar vintage namely: SAFe is to Agile what Six Sigma is to Innovation and Sharepoint is to Knowledge Management. This in turn generated a more extensive debate on LinkedIn which saw a few SAFe trainers and coaches defend their position.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  TUESDAY, JULY 18, 2017
    [Knowledge Management] filter failure is not acceptable
    The challenge for any organization dependent on knowledge is to ensure that implicit knowledge from those closest to customers and the external world informs the explicit knowledge that is shared throughout the company. Knowledge flow has to continuously become knowledge stock. Individuals practising personal knowledge mastery have to be an intrinsic part of organizational knowledge management. Fake news. PR hype. Content marketing.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2011
    [Knowledge Management] Socialcast and social learning
    Exception management through social networks gives management clear insight into the resources needed for handling these exceptions. A more recent post on the evolution of knowledge management clearly shows the need to support the sharing of tacit knowledge in a complex and creative economy: This is a blog worth subscribing to.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  WEDNESDAY, MAY 30, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] It’s time to focus on your LQ
    On 11 June 2012 we will start the next online personal knowledge management workshop. These workshops are not just for ‘learning professionals’ but for any role; from sales to marketing to production, and especially for management. Learning is everywhere in the connected workplace. Networked professionals need more than advice (training); they need ongoing, real-time, constantly-changing, collaborative, support.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  MONDAY, MAY 16, 2011
    [Knowledge Management] Managing in a networked world
    Tweet In 2009, Anthony Poncier wrote a good post (in French) that covered the eight challenges of management in the virtual era; loosely translated as: Being concurrently nomadic and collaborative. The production of collective knowledge. Managing with both IQ and EQ (emotional quotient). This fosters transparency and is something to be modelled by management. I’ve said before that personal knowledge management (PKM) is our part of the social learning contract.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  TUESDAY, AUGUST 28, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] Trust is an emergent property of effective networks
    Cooperation is also a major factor in personal knowledge management , for we each need to share and trust, as our part of the social business (learning) contract. It seems that markets, our dominant form of economic transactions, are not really designed to optimize trust. As Charles Green states: The reason is simple: trust is not a market transaction, it’s a human transaction. People don’t work by supply and demand, they work by karmic reciprocity.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014
    [Knowledge Management] Six roles of network management
    If helping the network make better decisions is a primary role of management in the emerging economy, how does one get there? I highlighted the six roles of management in the network era in my last post and I would like to build on these and show how this is being practiced at Change Agents Worldwide. We are all knowledge managers at CAWW, sharing as we work transparently. The organizational knowledge base, much of it captured in a large wiki, constantly grows.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] Grappling with Knowledge
    Paper-based knowledge can’t scale. The Net scales knowledge. The difference between IM [information management] and KM [knowledge management] is the difference between a recipe and a chef, a map of London and a London cabbie, a book and its author. It is folly to ever call it knowledge, because that is the domain of the brain. Of course, I speak here of individual knowledge. Knowledge Inventories via @IsabelDeClercq.
  • JANE HART  |  TUESDAY, MARCH 6, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] Reserve a seat for my webinar: In conversation with Harold Jarche
    Topic : PKM (Personal Knowledge Management): making sense of the Social Web. He has been described as “a keen subversive of the last century’s management and education models”. You can read more about Personal Knowledge Management (PKM) on Harold’s website here: Personal Knowledge Management. My guest in my next In conversation with … webinar is my Internet Time Alliance colleague, Harold Jarche.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  SUNDAY, JANUARY 12, 2014
    [Knowledge Management] PKM Roles
    I like to frame personal knowledge management as a combination of seeking knowledge, making sense of it, and sharing it with others. But in fact, like most things, different people have different personality types, and different personality profiles in relation to their personal knowledge affinities and capabilities. – PKM: A DIY Guide to Knowledge Management. This is a good guide for work groups to find out how knowledge is co-created and shared.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] Informal learning, the 95% solution
    It was part of the Taylorist, industrial model that also compartmentalized work and ensured that only managers were allowed to make decisions. There are methods from knowledge management, organizational development and human performance technology, for example, that are quite useful in supporting informal learning. Integrating the best of what we know from multiple disciplines, in an evidence-based fashion, is the way to proceed and support complex, creative, knowledge work.
  • HAROLD JARCHE  |  SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012
    [Knowledge Management] PKM Workshops
    The final scheduled personal knowledge management workshop finishes this weekend. Here is a great explanation from Jack Vinson , who shared his years of KM experience during the workshop: Personal knowledge management is the idea that individuals have to be responsible for managing to get things done. With four workshops this year and 110 participants, I have learned as much as anyone else.
  • EUEN SEMPLE  |  THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2014
    [Knowledge Management] The perils of professionalism
    When my boss asked my at the BBC if I would be OK with the job title of Director Of Knowledge Management my response was "You can call me what you like so long as you continue to pay me". I have often found it challenging when someone introduces themselves to me as "a professional communicator". I am invariably left wondering what that makes me after 53 years on the planet - an enthusiastic amateur?
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