David Weinberger

Informed consent for human sensors

David Weinberger

Friend (CEO at that same outfit) write about a project in which users of a health monitoring app have given informed consent to have their data made available to other researchers. How to get informed consent via an app? The post Informed consent for human sensors appeared first on Joho the Blog In a post at Nature Biotechnology , John Wilbanks (Chief Commons Officer at Sage Bionetworks) and Stephen H.

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Information is the opposite of information

David Weinberger

The ordinary language use of “information” in some ways is the opposite of the technical sense given the term by Claude Shannon — the sense that kicked off the Information Age. Shannon’s information is a measure of surprise: the more unexpected is the next letter a user lays down in Scrabble, the more information it conveys. ” The more surprising the news is, the more important the information is.

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Trending Sources

[2b2k] No, now that you mention it, we’re not overloaded with information

David Weinberger

On a podcast today, Mitch Joel asked me something I don’t think anyone else has: Are we experiencing information overload? That’s where I think we are with information overload. But it’s not Information Overload any more than the atmosphere is Air Overload. Information overload is so 1990s Everyone else assumes that we are. Including me. I found myself answering no, we are not. There is of course a reasonable and valid reason to say that we are.

[2b2k] [berkman] Alison Head on how students seek information

David Weinberger

Alison Head, who is at the Berkman Center and the Library Information Lab this year, but who is normally based at U of Washington’s Info School, is giving a talk called “Modeling the Information-Seeking Process of College Students.” Omitting key information.

[liveblog] AI Advance opening: Jonathan Zittrain and lightning talks

David Weinberger

Omitting key information. I’m at a day-long conference/meet-up put on by the Berkman Klein Center ‘s and MIT Media Lab ‘s “ AI for the Common Good ” project. NOTE: Live-blogging. Getting things wrong. Missing points. Introducing artificial choppiness. Over-emphasizing small matters. Paraphrasing badly. Not running a spellpchecker. Mangling other people’s ideas and words. You are warned , people. Jonathan Zittrain gives an opening talk.

[liveblog] Ed tech hackathon

David Weinberger

Omitting key information. Our group created — in a demo hackathon-ish way — a tool that helps teachers create workgroups for collaborative learning based on information gleaned from machine learning about learning capabilities. I’m at an education technology hackathon — “Shaping the Future” — put on by MindCET , an ed tech accelerator created by the Center for Educational Technology in Israel.

[2b2k][everythingismisc]“Big data for books”: Harvard puts metadata for 12M library items into the public domain

David Weinberger

Harvard University has today put into the public domain (CC0) full bibliographic information about virtually all the 12M works in its 73 libraries. (Here’s a version of the text of a submission I just made to BoingBong through their “Submitterator”). This is (I believe) the largest and most comprehensive such contribution. The metadata, in the standard MARC21 format, is available for bulk download from Harvard.

What blogging was

David Weinberger

Some of us had been arguing from the beginning of the Web that the Web was more a social space than a publishing, informational or commercial space — “more” in the sense of what was driving adoption and what was making the Web the dominant shaping force of our culture. We are more comfortable with informal, personal writing. At a recent Fellows Hour at the Berkman Center the topic was something like “Whatever happened to blogging?,”

Reddit and community journalism

David Weinberger

What’s interesting to a community is not enough to make us well informed because our community’s interests tend to be parochial and self-reinforcing. I’ve come to love Reddit. What started as a better Digg (and is yet another happy outcome of the remarkable Y Combinator ) has turned into a way of sharing and interrogating news. Reddit as it stands is not the future of news. It is, however, a hope for news.

[2b2k] 13 reasons why the Britannica failed on paper

David Weinberger

Topics had to be consistently shrunk or discarded to make room for new information. In the straight-up match between paper and Web, the Encyclopedia Britannica lost. This was as close to a sure thing as we get outside of the realm of macro physics and Meryl Streep movies. The EB couldn’t cover enough: 65,000 topics compared to the almost 4M in the English version of Wikipedia.

[2b2k] Linking is a public good

David Weinberger

Mathew’s point is that linking is a good journalistic practice, even if author of the the second article independently confirmed the information in the first, as happened in this case. It is thus a stopping point in the ecology of information. Mathew Ingram at GigaOm has posted the Twitter stream that followed upon his tweet criticizing the Wall Street Journal for running an article based on a post by TechCrunch’s MC Siegler , who responded in an angry post.

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The World According to TED

David Weinberger

Keep in mind that I am grossly incompetent at this , so I’ve included the SQL queries I used to derive this information so you can see how wrong I’ve gone and can laugh and laugh. How art, technology and design inform creative lea… 988724 . Here’s some info about the 2,200 TED Talks based largely on the tags that TED supplies on its Web site; the data are a few months old.

Aaron Swartz was not a hacker. He was a builder.

David Weinberger

He was a builder: Aaron helped build the RSS standard that enabled a rush of information and ideas — what we blandly call “content” — to be distributed, encountered, and re-distributed. Of course Aaron was a legendary prodigy of a hacker in the sense of someone who can build anything out of anything. But that’s not what the media mean when they call him a hacker.

[berkman] Anil Dash on “The Web We Lost”

David Weinberger

Omitting key information. Now, with the introduction of Adlinks and AdSense, Google transformed links from the informative and aesthetic, to an economic tool for SEO. Anil Dash is giving a Berkman lunchtime talk, titled “The Web We Lost.” ” He begins by pointing out that the title of his talk implies a commonality that at least once was. NOTE: Live-blogging. Getting things wrong. Missing points. Introducing artificial choppiness. Over-emphasizing small matters.

Transparency is the new objectivity

David Weinberger

Nevertheless, objectivity — even as an unattainable goal — served an important role in how we came to trust information, and in the economics of newspapers in the modern age. We were told that bloggers have agendas, whereas journalists give us objective information. Transparency gives the reader information by which she can undo some of the unintended effects of the ever-present biases.

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[2b2k] Truth, knowledge, and not knowing: A response to “The Internet Ruins Everything”

David Weinberger

Quentin Hardy has written up on the NYT Bits blog the talk I gave at UC Berkeley’s School of Information a few days ago, refracting it through his intelligence and interests. It’s a terrific post and I appreciate it. I want to amplify the answer I gave to Quentin’s question at the event. And I want to respond to the comments on his post that take me as bemoaning the fate of knowledge in the age of the Net.

[2b2k] Attribution isn’t just about credit. It’s about networking knowledge.

David Weinberger

As the piece says about the Poynter Institute ‘s Kelly McBride : [McBride] struck another theme, echoed by other ethics experts: that providing such credit would have enabled readers to find other sources of information on the subject, especially through online links. David Kay pointed out to me a piece by Arthur Brisbane, the NY Times Public Editor.

Noam Chomsky, security, and equivocal information

David Weinberger

It literally carries no information, even in the technical sense: it’s completely predictable and thus carries no info. I am a little bit hung-up, however, on his equivocating on “information.” Chomsky is of course right in his implied definition of information. (He Modern information is often described as a measure of surprise. Information theory lets us quantify how much information is conveyed by streams of varying predictability.

[liveblog] PAPIs: Cynthia Rudin on Regulating Greed

David Weinberger

Omitting key information. I’m at the PAPIs (Predictive Applications and APIS) [twitter: papistotio ] conference at the NERD Center in Cambridge. NOTE: Live-blogging. Getting things wrong. Missing points. Introducing artificial choppiness. Over-emphasizing small matters. Paraphrasing badly. Not running a spellpchecker. Mangling other people’s ideas and words. You are warned , people. The first speaker is Cynthia Rudin , Director of the Prediction Analysis Lab at MIT.

[iab] Frances Donegan-Ryan

David Weinberger

Omitting key information. The sequence of our searches gives especially useful information to help the engine figure out what you’re trying to find out. At the IAB conference, Frances Donegan-Ryan from Bing begins by reminding us of the history of online search. NOTE: Live-blogging. Getting things wrong. Missing points. Introducing artificial choppiness. Over-emphasizing small matters. Paraphrasing badly. Not running a spellpchecker.

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[2b2k] The commoditizing and networking of facts

David Weinberger

In Wikidata you will be able to enter that information in a way that makes it processable by the computer. Ars Technica has a post about Wikidata , a proposed new project from the folks that brought you Wikipedia. From the project’s introductory page : Many Wikipedia articles contain facts and connections to other articles that are not easily understood by a computer, like the population of a country or the place of birth of an actor.

Kew Gardens adopts Web principles for real-world wayfinding

David Weinberger

” From the abstract: In October 2010, Kew Gardens commissioned an in-depth study of visitors’ motivations and information needs around its 300-acre site, with the express aim that it should guide the development of new mobile apps. Indeed, the paper’s overall point is that architects of information spaces ought not pick a single motive for those spaces’ users, and that is one of the fundamental lessons of the newly miscellanized world.

[avignon] President Sarkozy

David Weinberger

Omitting key information. They move us into the grand hall — vaulted ceilings — for a talk by Pres. Nikolas Sarkozy. Sarkozy has not exactly been a friend of the Internet. The last time I heard him talk was at LeWeb when he was a candidate. Among the three candidates who spoke there, Sarkozy’s talk was clearly the most hostile to the Internet, viewing it primarily as a site of gossip and slander. NOTE: Live-blogging. Getting things wrong. Missing points.

David Weinberger - Untitled Article

David Weinberger

Because my informal market research — I sat myself in an airless room, asked myself some questions, and rewarded myself with m&m’s — indicates that I will just get more annoyed at the NYTimes, and regret its insistence on losing its place in our culture.

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[sogeti] Andrew Keen on Vertigo and Big Data

David Weinberger

Omitting key information. Andrew Keen is speaking. (I I liveblogged him this spring when he talked at a Sogeti conference.) His talk’s title: “How today’s online social revolution is dividing, diminishing, and disorienting us.” ” [ Note: Posted without rereading because I'm about to talk. I may go back and do some cleanup. ]. NOTE: Live-blogging. Getting things wrong. Missing points. Introducing artificial choppiness. Over-emphasizing small matters.

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If we had called it the Age of Patterns instead of the Age of Information

David Weinberger

Claude Shannon, a father of Information Science, had to call the differences that move through telephone wires something. He picked “information,&# a term that had meant, roughly, something that you hadnt known, or the content of written tables. Had he called it “data,&# or “patterns,&# or “differences,&# or “Arthur,&# we would have skipped right past one of the false continuities: from information to knowledge.

Respect the Internet

David Weinberger

E.g., would you like to know that this morning I keynoted the Canadian Research Knowledge Network meeting outside of Ottawa, and that on Monday I gave the John Seely Brown lecture at the University of Michigan School of Information? With Douglas Rushkoff I’m keynoting a Ketchum event called “ Respect the Internet ” [ more here ] tomorrow. The subtitle of the day is “Is marketing ruining the Net?” ” Sounds like it should be fun. (It’s

HyperCard@25

David Weinberger

TBL’s real genius was that he wrote protocols and standards by which hyperlinked information could be displayed and shared. The Web took off because it wasn’t an application, but a specification for how applications could share hyperlinked information.

[2b2k] Science as social object

David Weinberger

” The results provided by search engines “may all be linked in a self-reinforcing informational spiral…”[3] This leads them to ask an important question: Is the World Wide Web opening up a new world of easily accessible scientific information to lay audiences with just a few clicks? An article in published in Science on Thursday, securely locked behind a paywall , paints a mixed picture of science in the age of social media.

[2b2k] Social Science in the Age of Too Big to Know

David Weinberger

” Gary also points to “the coming end of the quantitative-qualitative divide” in the social sciences, as new techniques enable massive amounts of qualitative data to be quantified, enriching purely quantitative data and extracting additional information from the qualitative reports. Gary King [twitter: kinggarry ] , Director of Harvard’s Institute for Quantitative Social Science , has published an article ( Open Access !)

Library as starting point

David Weinberger

These are all straightforward ways to start record and use information about the items the community has voted for with its library cards. A new report on Ithaka S+R ‘s annual survey of libraries suggests that library directors are committed to libraries being the starting place for their users’ research, but that the users are not in agreement. This then calls into question the expenditures libraries make to achieve that goal. Hat tip to Carl Straumsheim and Peter Suber.).

Municipal nets, municipal electric power, and learning from history

David Weinberger

The debate over whether municipalities should be allowed to provide Internet access has been heating up. Twenty states ban it. Tom Wheeler, the chair of the FCC, has said he wants to “ preempt ” those laws. Congress is maneuvering to extend the ban nationwide.

[berkman] From Freedom of Information to Open data … for open accountability

David Weinberger

Omitting key information. The Web is making the Freedom of Information Act (FOIOA) obsolete. An open data policy is necessary to keep freedom of information up to date, and to move toward open accountability. One of the cornerstones of transparency policy is freedom of information regulation. Modern FOI laws require governments to react to requests and to proactively provide information. (In Another reason: It’s one-way information. Filipe L.

Against hard cases

David Weinberger

Whether you or the solitary man on the track dies is of no interest to the utilitarian calculus, unless you throw in some more information, such as you are a reprobate who only has two weeks to live anyway, and the man on the tracks is an adorable baby whom we know will grow up to be the greatest Nobel Prize winner of them all. “But how do we know that he has the information?” ” “A reliable informant.”

Revolution, politics, and the Internet

David Weinberger

Omitting key information. Another guy had a network over there…We organized a lot of things to get the information out.” On November 11, I had the privilege of being on a panel with Slim Amamou (one of the leaders of the Tunisian revolution) and Rick Falkvinge (the founder of the Swedish Pirate Party). The panel was organized by Luca de Biase at the Italian Internet Governance Forum in Trento. Here are my notes, taken while up on dais: NOTE: Live-blogging.

We are the medium

David Weinberger

McLuhan was reacting against information science’s view of a medium as that through which a signal (or message) passes. Information science purposefully abstracted itself from every and any particular medium, aiming at theories that held whether you were talking about tin can telephones or an inter-planetary Web. Because we are the medium, news is no longer mere information.

[nextweb] The Open Source Bank of Brewster

David Weinberger

Omitting key information. I’m at the Next Web conference in Amsterdam. A large cavern is full of entrepreneurs and Web marketing folks, mainly young. From my end of the bell curve, most crowds are young.) 2,500 attendees.

Violate copyright? No Facebook for you!

David Weinberger

” No, there’s nothing even remotely Soviet about continuous surveillance that judges you via a bureaucracy without appeal, and punishes you by blocking access to information until you come back from re-education camp. According to TorrentFreak , a leaked AT&T training doc indicates that starting on Nov.

[misc] I bet your ontology never thought of this one!

David Weinberger

For example, if you’re gathering information about books, you’d have a schema that has slots for title, author, date, publisher, etc. And I can see why that would be a crucial bit of information. Paul Deschner and I had a fascinating conversation yesterday with Jeffrey Wallman, head of the Tibetan Buddhist Resource Center about perhaps getting his group’s metadata to interoperate with the library metadata we’ve been gathering.

Getting the path from the Dropbox API

David Weinberger

Figuring out how to get that path information took me /for/ev/er. That function is passed information about the files that have been opened by the user in an array, but since I’m only allowing users to open one file at a time, the information is always going to be in the first and only element of that array. That information includes something called “link,” which is a link to the file that does not include the path information.

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