Clark Quinn

Revisiting the Ecosystem

Clark Quinn

Similarly, we use social elements like coaching, mentoring, and informal learning to develop ourselves and our organizations over time. One of the keys to the L&D revolution is recognizing the full performance ecosystem and the ways technology can support performance and development.

Reconciling Formal and Informal

Clark Quinn

Recently, there’s been a lot of talk about informal learning, which ends up sounding like formal learning, and this can be confusing. Now, let’s move on to informal learning, as this is where, to me, we have a conflict.

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A Bad Tart

Clark Quinn

accurate retention of information). Good learning requires a basis for intrinsic interest. The topic should be of interest to the learner, a priori or after the introduction. If the learner doesn’t ‘get’ why this learning is relevant to them, it doesn’t stick as well. And this isn’t what gamification does. So tarting up content is counter-productive. It’s a bad (s)tart! Ok, to be clear, there’re two types of gamification.

The change is here

Clark Quinn

They are a wee bit old-school, however, as while they do discuss innovation throughout, it isn’t a core focus and their definition of learning doesn’t include informal learning.

Organizational Learning Engineering

Clark Quinn

It’s time for organizational learning to move into the information age, and start performing like professionals.

To LMS or not to LMS

Clark Quinn

When we start making a continuum between formal and informal learning, what’s the right suite of tools? A colleague recently asked (in general, not me specifically) whether there’s a role for LMS functions. Her query was about the value of having a place to see (recommended) courses, to track your development, etc. And that led me to ponder, and here’s my thinking: My question is where to draw the line.

Continual Exploration

Clark Quinn

The immediate benefits are that you can easily link information that was previously siloed, and track real time changes. I was reading about Digital Business Platforms, which is a move away from siloed IT systems to create a unified environment.

How to learn and learn-to-learn

Clark Quinn

I think experimenting with different media, and working out how to manage the flow of information is critical. I was asked by a colleague to answer some questions for a project on how to learn. I naturally decided to answer in a blog post ;).

To show or not to show (and when)

Clark Quinn

informal learning), we know that sharing before others have had their chance to think, it can color their output. At an event the other evening, showing various career technology tools, someone said something that I thought was just wrong. I asked afterwards, and then explained why I thought it was wrong. The response was “well, there can be different ways to go about it” And frankly, there really can’t.

Augmented Reality Lives!

Clark Quinn

Which is why I like AR: it’s about annotating the world with information, which augments it to our benefit. Non-coordinated visual information, information that’s not overlaid visually, is presented as either graphics or text (think Yelp: maps and distances to nearby options).

Evil design?

Clark Quinn

Writing, diagrams, client files, lots of important information! This is a rant, but it’s coupled with lessons. . I’ve been away, and one side effect was a lack of internet bandwidth at the residence. In the first day I’d used up a fifth of the allocation for the whole time (> 5 days)! So, I determined to do all I could to cut my internet usage while away from the office.

Learning Through the Wild

Clark Quinn

Similarly, the staff at the camps also do a good job of advocating for the wilderness (as they would), and there are guidebooks available for perusal to learn more, as well as information around the dining rooms (and great food!).

The Grail of Effective and Engaging Learning Experiences

Clark Quinn

model-based guidance: the best guide for practice is a conceptual basis (not rote information). There’s a considerable gap between what we can be doing, and what we are doing. When you look at what’s out there, we see that there are several way in which we fall short of the mark.

Design 106

Tackling the tough stuff

Clark Quinn

We learn through designed action and guided reflection, not information dump and knowledge test. I was reflecting a wee bit on my books (and writings in general), and realized that there’s somewhat of a gap when I talk about games, and mobile, and more.

Coherent Implications

Clark Quinn

An important element is the flow of information within the model; ensuring that there are no barriers to making effective choices. Decisions, then, are about how to facilitate the most optimal flow of information without compromising organizational integrity.

Mindmapping

Clark Quinn

Still, mindmaps capture structural information in a visual way, that supports tapping into our powerful visual processing system. You can add information to them; as a visual tool, you can add extra graphical information, like tables or charts, to augment the map.

Working and learning out loud

Clark Quinn

I’ve been thinking about some of the talk around the Future of Work, and in addition to the free flow of information I recently posted about from the Coherent Organization, I think working out loud is another component. What’s the benefit of getting feedback to improve versus what’s the downside of information getting out to competitors or exposing regulated data?

Defining Microlearning?

Clark Quinn

Just like I can look up the specs on the resolution of my computer screen, use that information, but have to look it up again next time. Last week on the #chat2lrn twitter chat, the topic was microlearning. It was apparently prompted by this post by Tom Spiglanin which does a pretty good job of defining it, but some conceptual confusion showed up in the chat that makes it clear there’s some work to be done.

A ‘Critical Friend’?

Clark Quinn

So what I’m doing is getting to know the situation, rapidly consuming lots of documents, interviewing people, and sitting in on other information gathering sessions, to get to know what’s up. I’m participating in an engagement, and they were struggling to define my role. Someone mentioned that I’m serving as a ‘critical friend’, and the others cottoned on to it. I hadn’t heard that term so I explored, and liked what I found.

Content isn’t a silo

Clark Quinn

Truly, if you want to be part of the strategic picture going forward, you have to work with information tools. I mentioned in my previous post that I was talking at the xAPI camp about content strategy, and on the way in I created a new diagram to convey a concept I wanted to discuss.

Scenarios and Conceptual Clarity

Clark Quinn

You use some sort of sleight of hand, such as “a supervisor catches the mistake and rectifies it, informing you…” to make it all ok. I recently came across an article ostensibly about branching scenarios, but somehow the discussion largely missed the point.

‘Form’ing learning

Clark Quinn

They are fans of Make It Stick (mentioned in my Deeper eLearning reading list ), so it was easy to help them recognize that good activities require learners retrieve the information in context , so each formative evaluation should be a situation requiring a decision. Last week I ran a workshop for an online university that is working to improve it’s learning design. Substantially. They’re ramping up their staff abilities, and we’d talked about how I could help.

A richer suite of support

Clark Quinn

While it’s easy to say that the role of formal learning wanes, and the role of informal learning ramps up, what are the types of support we might look to?

Where is Clark?

Clark Quinn

If you’re here in the Bay Area, it should be fun and informative. So, where am I this spring? I was at ATD’s Techknowledge in January, and as this is published I’m on my way to Long Beach for their Core 4 event (sold out; if you’re one of the lucky ones there, say hi!). I’m taking the train (and a bus); look forward to watching the terrain roll by and writing. But there’re a couple more events this spring.

Designing Learning Like Professionals

Clark Quinn

For instance, there’re sound cognitive reasons why information dump and knowledge test won’t lead to learning. Information that’s not applied doesn’t stick, and application that’s not sufficient doesn’t stick. I’m increasingly realizing that the ways we design and develop content are part of the reason why we’re not getting the respect we deserve.

Rethinking Design: Curriculum

Clark Quinn

We’re more likely to remember information we’ve had to process rather than information we’ve just been presented with. In addition to yesterday’s post about pedagogy , I also mentioned the need to get deeper on curriculum as well.

Ambiguity Denial Syndrome?

Clark Quinn

Instead we see one-shot development of information dumps and knowledge tests, which aren’t going to help organizations. Too many processes I see reflect industrial age thinking, and we’re in an information age.

Socially Acceptable

Clark Quinn

Social learning is: not about (just) formal: as suggested above, social extends from formal out to informal to being an essential part of how business gets done. Good social learning is: communicating by pointing to relevant new information. I was talking with my ITA colleagues, and we were discussing the state of awareness of social learning. And we were somewhat concerned that at least from some evidence, there’re some misconceptions around about social learning.

Augmenting AR for Learning

Clark Quinn

We’re hearing more and more about AR (Augmented Reality), and one of it’s core elements is layering information on top of the world. But in a conversation the other night, it occurred to me that we could push that information to be even more proactive in facilitating learning. Imagine that when we presented this information, we asked the learner to make an inference based upon the displayed model.

Aligning with us

Clark Quinn

I think alignment is a big thing, both from the Coherent Organization perspective of having our flows of information aligned , and in processes that help us move forward, but with, well, our humanity.

Why Work Out Loud? (for #wolweek)

Clark Quinn

They can provide pointers to useful information, they can provide tips about what worked, and didn’t, for them, and they’re better prepared for what will be forthcoming. Why should one work out loud (aka Show Your Work )? Certainly, there are risks involved. You could be wrong. You could have to share a mistake. Others might steal your ideas. So why would anyone want to be Working Out Loud ? Because the risks are trumped by the benefits.

Supporting our Brains

Clark Quinn

We also have limited ability to carry information around for the same reasons, but we can create external representations (such as notes or scribbles) that can hold those thoughts for us. However, technology can remember arbitrary and abstract information completely.

Rethinking Design: Pedagogy

Clark Quinn

In typical approaches, you’d be presenting conceptual information (e.g. a decision tree), or a checklist, or something that requires them to use the information. And if the information doesn’t support doing, it’s probably not necessary.)

Social Media Policy?

Clark Quinn

While your systems may vary, your results should be sources for you to find information, present yourself in your various communities, and to share your thoughts. So what’s your social media policy? It’s not something you should do lightly, or haphazardly, it seems to me. In fact, such a policy really is part of your personal knowledge mastery.

Vale Jay Cross

Clark Quinn

It amazed me how he could remember all that information and point out things as we walked. He had a phenomenal memory; he read more than anyone I know, and synthesized the information to create an impressive intellect. His book Informal Learning had a major impact on the field.

Collaborative Modelling in AR (and VR)

Clark Quinn

while viewing, not offline), we can find some powerful learning opportunities, both formal and informal. And for informal learning, having team or community members working to collaboratively annotate their environment or represent their understanding could solve problems and advance a community’s practices.

Aligning

Clark Quinn

It means we should be looking to augment how we think, with tools and processes like performance support, helping us find information with powerful search. Particularly rote information. The trend to an event comprised of information dump and knowledge test we know doesn’t work. We’re in an information age, and industrial models just won’t cut it.

Better Learning in the Real World

Clark Quinn

We’ll switch the emphasis from knowledge test to mini- and branching-scenarios for practice tasks, or we’ll have them take information resources and use them to generate work products (charts, tables, analyses) as processing. I tout the value of learning science and good design.

2015 top 10 tools for learning

Clark Quinn

Not making the top 10 but useful tools include Google Maps for directions, Yelp for eating, Good Reader as a way to read and annotate PDFs, and Safari, where I’ve bookmarked a number of sites I read every day like news (ABC and Google News), information on technology, and more. Jane Hart has been widely and wisely known for her top 100 Tools for Learning (you too can register your vote ).

Tools 70

Beyond Consulting

Clark Quinn

One of the interesting things was a model he had that pitted your depth of information against your ability to implement. So I’d put someone high on the theory/information side as an academic or researcher, whether they’re in an institution or not.