Learn Informal Learning Informally

Jay Cross

Next month I’ll be offering an experiential workshop on Informal Learning through Jane Hart’s Social Learning Center. Hands-on experiential learning. The month-long event is appropriate for decision-makers, designers, CLOs, innovation leaders, managers of communications, and others who want to accelerate learning in their organization. You learn by doing. find out how to integrate learning into workflow.

Informal learning, the 95% solution

Harold Jarche

Tweet Informal learning is not better than formal training; there is just a whole lot more of it. It’s 95% of workplace learning, according to the research behind this graphic, by Gary Wise. Since the latter half of the 20th century, we have gone through a period where training departments have been directed to control organizational learning. In this context, only training professionals were allowed to talk about learning. Informal Learning

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Don’t drink the informal learning snake oil

Jay Cross

The 1999 Online Learning conference in Los Angeles was ground zero for eLearning. Our dream of personalized, modular, always-on learning was dashed. I fear that charlatans and dummies are taking informal learning down the same road. An Informal Learning Sequel? While it took six years to arrive, informal learning has become L&D’s flavor of the day. Numerous consultants are offering to help manage informal learning. (It

Co-design of workflow

Clark Quinn

I’ve talked before about how our design task will need to accommodate both the formal learning and the informal job resources, but as I’ve been thinking about (and working on) this model, it occurs to me that there is another way to think about learning design that we have to consider. The first notion is that we should not design our formal learning solutions without thinking about what the performance support aspects are as well.

10 pieces of advice on the web, workflow, & learning

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

After a lengthy hibernation, Learning Light ’s eLearning Centre rides again! From a press release yesterday: Learning Light has now launched the new look and feel e-learning centre. The e-Learning Centre is a free information resource for learning and development professionals and e-learning developers. Jay Cross pushes the envelope again on e-learning. Emergent learning a new view of e-learning.

The new workplace

Jay Cross

Six years ago few people believed that informal learning made much of a difference. Today’s common wisdom is that most workplace learning is experiential, unplanned, social, and informal. Informal learning tops many training department agendas. They’ve converted a few programs but they’ve failed to improve their learning ecosystems. We’ve shifted how we think about learning since the Informal Learning book came out.

Dear C-Suite: We Don’t Do Training Anymore

Dan Pontefract

It’s time to help the C-Suite – aside from Peter Aceto and other learning savvy and employee engagement focused C-Suite leaders – to appreciate and understand that organizations don’t do training anymore. Sure, for the purists and traditionalists in the learning space who are hell-bent to ensure the ‘sage on the stage’ continues, I’m certain they will scoff at the very mention of trying to erase the term training from Oxford’s illustrious dictionary.

Standalone LMS is Still Dead (rebutting & agreeing w/ Dave Wilkins)

Dan Pontefract

Last week, Dave Wilkins of Learn.com wrote a piece entitled “ A Defense of the LMS (and a case for the future of social learning) ”. Formal learning needs to blend with any informal and social learning output in the new world. (ie. Informal or social learning needs to blend with formal learning. What we need to do is ensure we weave a formal, informal and social learning workflow together. Why Learning 2.0 & Enterprise 2.0

Training Evaluation: a mug’s game

Harold Jarche

Dan Pontefract is quite clear in Dear Kirkpatrick’s: You still don’t get it : Let me be clear – training is not an event; learning is a connected, collaborative and continuous process. It can and does occur in formal, informal and social ways every day in and out of your job. The ‘event’ is not solely how learning occurs. Event-based instructional interventions, or the course as learning vehicle, is an outdated and useless way to look at workplace learning.

Feedforward

Harold Jarche

This is why “perpetual Beta” informs all of my work. I’m now focused on working smarter , helping organizations integrate learning into the workflow, especially using social media. Informal Learning InternetTime PKM SocialLearningOne of the consultant’s dilemmas is that you have to stay ahead of the curve to remain relevant. Yesterday’s problem doesn’t need to be solved – there’s probably an app for that already.

Vendor-neutral

Harold Jarche

Last year I wrote , “Now social learning is being picked up by software vendors and marketers as the next solution-in-a-box, when it’s more of an approach and a cultural mind-set.&# In 2005, social learning online was a fringe activity that we had to test using open source platforms like Drupal. I remember when we ran our informal learning unworkshops in 2006 while the major enterprise software vendors ignored us or privately told us there was no market for this stuff.

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Once more, across that chasm

Harold Jarche

Workflow Learning (including wider acceptance of performance support instead of training). A year later the use of blogs had exploded, while workflow learning had stalled and I noted that an understanding of the value of informal learning was catching on. Informal learning is being discussed throughout the profession, but in many cases it’s just lipstick on a pig. Tags: Informal Learning Technology

It’s time to focus on your LQ

Harold Jarche

Learning is everywhere in the connected workplace. However, many of us have relegated our own learning to the specialists over the years – teachers, instructors, professors. We’re not used to handling all of this learning on our own. But if we want to thrive in complexity and if we want our work teams to be effective, we have to integrate our learning into the workflow. Additional skills are needed to help groups and teams learn as they work.

The Other 90% of Learning

Jay Cross

Knowledge workers learn three to four times as much from experience as from interaction with bosses, coaches, and mentors. They learn about twice as much from those conversations compared to structured courses and programs. It’s a handy framework to keep in mind, particularly when someone mistakenly thinks all learning is formal. As Charles Handy has written, “Real learning is not what most of us grew up thinking it was.”. Learning is social. Informal Learning

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Take off those rose coloured glasses

Harold Jarche

Training is only 5% of organizational learning , but for a long time this small slice has been the primary focus of most Learning & Development (L&D) departments. The other 95% was just taken care of by the informal networks in the organization. All those informal networks became hyper-connected. Social media are fantastic tools to support organizational collaboration and informal learning. Enable Learning. Support Learning.

EEA Learning Day

Harold Jarche

I will travelling and speaking for most of this week but will share what I have learned when I get back. Here is what I will be talking about: Keynote: Working Smarter in the Learning Organisation. As complexity increases in the networked economy, we need to integrate learning into the workflow. Learning and development in the networked workplace must move from content delivery to community enablement. Communities Informal Learning

The Learning Layer – Review

Harold Jarche

The Learning Layer: Building the next level of intellect in your organization , begins with some solid insights on how learning is the key to performing in the networked workplace. Learning has been the traditional realm of HR while most systems are supported by IT. Steve Flinn, the author, uses the analogy of knowledge as stock and learning as flow. And that systems can actually learn, and more specifically, learn from latent intellectual capital.

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Workplace Performance Services: more than just Training

Jane Hart

In his recent post, Informal Learning , 95% solution, Harold Jarche provides the reason why many workplace learning professionals can only think about “informal learning” and “social learning” in terms of how they can manage them within a blended training solution – rather than simply support them, as they happen, naturally and continuously, in the workflow. Social learning

learning in the flow of work

Harold Jarche

Social learning networks — with trusted relationships — enable better and faster knowledge feedback loops. Learning among ourselves is integral to complex and creative work. Social learning is how work gets done in a networked society. Management’s primary job is to support social learning. Work is learning, and [mostly informal] learning is the work. This is real learning in the flow of work— connected, social, and human.

Thinking Transformation

Clark Quinn

It’s about not just courses on a phone, but: Augmenting formal learning: extending it. Social: tapping into the power of social and informal learning. It’s about extending formal learning, not just delivering it.

making time for learning

Harold Jarche

For over a decade I have promoted the idea that work is learning & learning is the work. It seems the idea has now gone mainstream, as it’s even noted in Forbes that, “Work and learning will become analogous” It is much easier to just say that workflow learning is essential rather than putting in the structures and practices that can enable it. Social and informal learning are key to increasing insights that can drive innovation.

Embedding Learning in Work: The Benefits and Challenges

Charles Jennings

(a version of this article was originally written as background for an #OzLearn chat held on Twitter, 11th November 2014) The Power of Embedded Learning A common finding that has emerged from study after study over the past few years is that learning which is embedded in work seems to be more effective than learning away from work. If people learn as part of the workflow then this learning is more likely to impact performance in a positive way.

Some thoughts from 2012

Harold Jarche

Informal Learning: The 95% Solution. Informal learning is not better than formal training; there is just a whole lot more of it. It’s 95% of workplace learning, according to the research reviewed by Gary Wise. To create real learning organizations , there is a choice. How to learn and solve problems together is becoming the real business advantage. The Learning Organization. Learning in the workplace is much more than formal training.

Summarizing Learn for Yourself

Jay Cross

I just copied a rough draft of my new book, Learn For Yourself , into a free summarizer. It’s all a matter of learning, but it’s not the sort of learning that is the province of training departments, workshops, and classrooms. You are learning to learn how to become the person you wrote the obit for. It’s learning to know versus learning to be. Most of what we learn, we learn by interacting with others.

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Overcoming the Course and Control mindset hurdles

Jane Hart

My two recent Learning in the Workplace surveys showed that ( a ) people consider that informal learning is much more important, if not essential, to them than training, and ( b ) that they learn informally on a much more regular (if not continuous) basis than they learn formally. These findings are of course in line with study after study that shows that most learning in the workplace happens outside of formal training. Social learning

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insights over processes

Harold Jarche

For the more complex work done by people, we have to find ways to improve insights, and social learning is how we do it. Social learning involves transparent knowledge sharing, questioning assumptions, and experimenting together. To improve insights on an organizational level, all work must be focused on learning. Therefore, social and informal learning need to be integrated into the workflow. Process improvement, like Six Sigma, stifles innovation.

LMS vs. LCMS

Xyleme

The Learning and Development industry, like any other, has been inundated with new technologies and tools for learning. Buzz words in the industry include e-learning, mobile learning, cloud delivery, bite-sized learning, informal learning, learning record store, and single-source content development. Another important learning tool that some may not be familiar with is a Learning Content Management System (LCMS).

70-20-10: Origin, Research, Purpose

Charles Jennings

Calhoun Wick Cal is deeply experienced and knowledgeable in the area of workplace learning. He been studying and supporting it for many years and is co-author of the highly acclaimed Six Disciplines of Breakthrough Learning: How to Turn Training and Development into Business Results (Pfeiffer, 2010). Cal’s company has also developed the 70-20 tool , which supports learning in the workflow in innovative and measurable ways – it is well worth test driving.

It’s Only 65% !

Charles Jennings

The researchers (possibly on work experience) declared that “ 50:26:24 is the average learning mix in most companies right now ”. The report of the 50:26:24 survey went on to say: “It’s widely accepted that the 70:20:10 model is the most effective learning blend for business, but getting to that perfect mix can be a challenge. It also got me thinking about approaches to organisational learning in general. Learning ? Learning is a process not an event.

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Start with the 70. Plan for the 100.

Charles Jennings

Checklists to rate your own organisation’s ability to deliver the critical tasks supporting 70:20:10 Nine ‘cameos’ written by leading thinkers and practitioners including Dennis Mankin (Platinum Performance), Nigel Harrison (Performance Consulting), Clark Quinn (Quinnovation), Jane Hart (Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies), Bob Mosher (APPLY Synergies), Jack Tabak (Chief Learning Officer, Royal Dutch Shell), Jane Bozarth (US Government) and others.

Changing Role of the LMS

Xyleme

It seems that, for years, people have been writing obituaries for the corporate Learning Management System (LMS). I have worked with an LMS bundled by a major ERP system provider which had, by far, the most unintuitive interface and user workflows I have ever had the misfortune to encounter. They have little to do with informal learning. The title says it all: Learning Management System. Joining up competencies and performance data with learning opportunities.

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LMS vs. LCMS

Xyleme

While sometimes thought to be interchangeable terms, LMS (Learning Management System) and LCMS (Learning Content Management System) platforms share a few functionalities, but couldn’t be more different. A Learning Management System (LMS) is a software application that allows a company, school, or organization to administer, document, track, and report on the delivery of educational courses and training programs. Assigned learning. Individualized learning plan.

2012: That was the year that was

Jane Hart

1 - The Top 100 Tools for Learning 2012 list is revealed. On 1 October 2012 I revealed the results of the 6th Annual Survey of Tools for Learning – the Top 100 Tools for Learning 2012 – and provided a brief analysis of the results. 2 - 10 things to remember about social learning (and the use of social media for learning). 3 - Only 14% think that company training is an essential way for them to learn in the workplace.

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Social Learning is NOT a new training trend

Jane Hart

I’ve written a few postings recently (notably Social Learning doesn’t mean what you think it does ) where I have tried to show how the fundamental changes in how businesses are operating, require a fundamental change in how the L&D function needs to view workplace learning. I suggested this means a move from a “Command and Control” approach to an “Encourage and Engage” approach to Workplace Learning. Traditional workplace learning. Workflow audits.

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70:20:10 – Above All Else It’s a Change Agent

Charles Jennings

Tom is a rocket scientist and helps other helps rocket scientists learn their stuff. Recently Tom wrote a series of blogs titled ‘ Ten Things I Believe About Workplace Learning ’. The messages he conveyed in this short post struck me as having been missed by lots of people when they talk about the 70:20:10 model as a framework for learning and development. People aren’t hired to learn, they’re hired to increase productivity or capability. In other words, ‘informally’.

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Supporting the Social Workplace Learning Continuum

Jane Hart

In my previous blog post I explained how I recognized it is difficult for a lot of organisations to support informal and social learning in their organisations, because they are unable to jump the two mindset hurdles of (a) thinking that learning only happens in training courses, and (b) that all organisational learning needs to be controlled by Training/L&D departments. Social learning

Collaborative co-design

Clark Quinn

In my previous post , I mentioned that we needed to start thinking about designing not just formal learning content, or formal learning experiences, but learning experiences in the context of the informal learning resources (job aids, social tools), and moreover, learning in the context of a workflow. In short, tying back to my post on collaboratively designing job aids, I think we need to be collaboratively designing workflows.

The differences between learning in an e-business and learning in a social business

Jane Hart

In my recent webinar I shared a slide that showed the 5 stages of workplace learning. This has attracted a lot of interest, and I’ve been asked to talk more about the differences between “learning” in Stages 1-4 and Stage 5. Working and learning in Stages 1-4 is based upon a Taylorist , industrial age mindset. Similarly e-learning was also about automating traditional training practices. LEARNING IN AN E-BUSINESS. LEARNING IN A SOCIAL BUSINESS. Learning.

Four Ways User-Generated Content (UGC) Can Make its Way into.

Xyleme

Home > Learning Content Management , Social Learning > Four Ways User-Generated Content (UGC) Can Make its Way into Formal Learning Four Ways User-Generated Content (UGC) Can Make its Way into Formal Learning January 20th, 2010 Goto comments Leave a comment This past week, I’ve been reading and referring to Jane Hart’s article The State of Social Learning Today and some Thoughts for the Future of L&D in 2010 quite a bit. Learn more about Dawn here.

70-20-10: Origin, Research, Purpose

Charles Jennings

Calhoun Wick Cal is deeply experienced and knowledgeable in the area of workplace learning. He been studying and supporting it for many years and is co-author of the highly acclaimed Six Disciplines of Breakthrough Learning: How to Turn Training and Development into Business Results (Pfeiffer, 2010). Cal’s company has also developed the 70-20 tool , which supports learning in the workflow in innovative and measurable ways – it is well worth test driving.

Workforce Development Services: A new framework of training and learning support

Jane Hart

In my last blog post, From Social Learning to Workforce Collaboration , I talked about how I have been helping organisations support workforce collaboration. Following that post Dan Pontefract asked me this question: “Is this something that helps an external consultant, like yourself and ITA more so than it does those working inside an organization in a traditional ‘learning’ team?” Collaboration Social learning

A pause for reflection as I pass a Twitter milestone

Jane Hart

After 7 years operating another learning portal site, in 2006 I set up the Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies (C4LPT) as a free resource site about technologies, tools and tips for learning – in both education and in the workplace. Although in principle, it covers a wide range of technologies, I have tended to specialize in the use of social media for learning.

The future of business education will be centered on contextual learning

Trends in the Living Networks

One of the points I make is about the shift to highly contextual and modular learning: In the past people went to university, studied until they had a degree, then went to work and applied that knowledge. In the future learning will be modular, contextual and just in time. When an obstacle is encountered the solution is sought in the form of a specific module of learning needed to solve that particular problem. In this way learning is personalised and tailored.