Active sense-making

Harold Jarche

Yesterday, during my presentation on personal knowledge management to IBM BlueIQ I was asked about the role of blogging in my own sense-making processes. These are my half-baked thoughts which I make public in order to share and to learn. In my Seek>Sense><Share model, seeking and annotating information is important but cannot stand on its own. Seeking information is an important foundation to PKM online but it’s of little use without action.

Instructional or Formal; whatever

Harold Jarche

I used this chart, developed a few years ago, to explain in a simplified way the differences between Learning Interventions and Instructional Interventions. It shows that training & education (in the workplace) should concentrate on addressing a clear lack of knowledge and skills by using appropriate instructional interventions, well-established over the years. Informal learning would be another name for non-instructional.

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Leveraging collective knowledge

Harold Jarche

This week, a few related knowledge management (KM) articles crossed my path and I’d like to weave them together. Nancy Dixon discusses three eras of knowledge management as moving from Explicit Knowledge (document management) to Experiential Knowledge (communities of practice; expertise locators) and now to Collective Knowledge (social media). The illusion of knowledge.

The Evolving Social Organization

Harold Jarche

Innovation abounds in the early stages and knowledge capitalization is aided by a common vision of the business. Current management wisdom – based on Robin Dunbar’s research ; the size of military units through history; and the work of management experts such as Tom Peters – considers the ideal size of an organization to be around 150 people. Beyond this size, knowing everybody in person becomes impossible. Knowledge-Based View.

Fluctuating support networks

Harold Jarche

Judith passed on a couple of papers which I found most interesting, as she has looked deeply into the theory behind the need for what I would describe as social learning networks. As an informal response to the formal organization, fluctuating support networks deviate from the conventions of the formal organization and provide network members with a venue for fulfilling unmet social and psychological work-related needs.

What is the Important Work?

Clark Quinn

This isn’t news: things are moving faster, we’re having less resources available, our competition is more agile, the amount of relevant information is increasing, customers are more aware, the list goes on. Not surprisingly for regular readers, I think that the nature of work is changing. learn from mistakes. In essence, to do the important work faster. The fact is, our brains are really good at pattern matching, and bad at rote work.

Social Learning, Complexity and the Enterprise

Harold Jarche

Tweet The social learning revolution has only just begun. Corporations that understand the value of knowledge sharing, teamwork, informal learning and joint problem solving are investing heavily in collaboration technology and are reaping the early rewards. ~ Social learning. Why is social learning important for today’s enterprise? Our relationship with knowledge is changing as our work becomes more intangible and complex.