Workplace Learning: Adding, Embedding & Extracting

Charles Jennings

Adding Learning to Work When faced with the opportunities to help with workplace learning, many HR, talent development, and learning professionals react by simply adding learning to the workflow. Typically, adding learning involves integrating structured away-from-work learning (courses, classes, and eLearning modules) with learning activities within the workflow. There is excellent work being carried out that supports embedding learning within workflows. ‘

Building a Culture of Continuous Learning

Charles Jennings

To achieve these three targets, we need to think out of the traditional learning and development box – beyond the class/course and eLearning module approaches towards embedding a culture where learning becomes recognised as occurring within the workflow. Qualcomm’s ‘ 52 week''s’ programme is an excellent example of this approach - enhancing or replacing intensive away-from-work on-boarding with information and resources ‘injected’ into the workflow. Most people get it.

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The Knowledge and Learning Transfer Problem

Charles Jennings

from our 702010 towards 100% performance book) If learning is embedded in the daily flow of work, rather than away from the workflow, the idea that we need to develop ways to ‘transfer’ that learning into practical use disappears. Especially as most organisations have an often large and continuing investment in formal training and development, the vast majority of which is carried out away from the workflow.

It’s Only 65% !

Charles Jennings

The numbers are a useful reminder that the majority of learning occurs through experience and practice within the workflow (the ‘70’), through sharing and supporting others, conversations and networks (the ‘20’), and that a smaller amount of overall learning occurs through structured training and development activities (the ‘10’). Formal learning’ suggests learning that is designed and directed by someone other than the learner as part of a curriculum, course, programme, module etc.

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Start with the 70. Plan for the 100.

Charles Jennings

Extending Learning into the Workflow Many Learning & Development leaders are using the 70:20:10 model to help them re-position their focus for building and supporting performance across their organisations. They are finding it helps them extend the focus on learning out into the workflow. 10 solutions include training and development courses and programmes, eLearning modules and reading. In other words, do we develop class/workshop or eLearning.

Managing Learning?

Charles Jennings

The management modules of Systems such as PLATO (arguably the first LMS) the Computer Assisted Instruction system which was developed at the University of Illinois in 1960 (and finally shut down in 2006), were developed to support automated teaching operations (the ‘ATO’ part of the name) in a world where standardisation and automation were the primary goal. Donald Taylor recently published an article titled ‘ What does ‘LMS’ mean today ?’.

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The Best of Times, The Worst of Times: opportunities and challenges for the L&D profession

Charles Jennings

ON THE SURFACE THERE IS GENERAL SATISFACTION WITH EXISTING LEARNING INTERVENTIONS The vast majority of people attending learning events or learning interventions (classroom training, eLearning modules, virtual sessions) reported that they were satisfied with the event or intervention (in the survey 84% declared they were satisfied or very satisfied).

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The Need to Adapt to the Speed of Change or Die: lessons for L&D from the retail industry

Charles Jennings

Especially if they can gain that knowledge and expertise more easily and without leaving their desk or workflow. This may, or may not, involve designing, developing and delivering physical or virtual training, eLearning or some other intervention. I recall using one enterprise LMS that required 13 clicks of a mouse (some counter-intuitive) to register and launch an eLearning module. And we wondered why the generic eLearning library was under-used!

Text-to-Speech Overview and NLP Quality

Tony Karrer

This software adds text-to-speech voice narration to PowerPoint presentations and is used for training and eLearning at major corporations. Joel was nice enough to jump in and share his knowledge of applying text-to-speech technology to eLearning. Text-to-Speech Poised for Rapid Growth in eLearning Text-to-speech (TTS) is now at the point where virtual classrooms were about 4 years ago when they reached a technological maturity where they were mainstream.

[berkman] Dries Buytaert: Drupal and sustaining collaborative efforts

David Weinberger

Drupal has 10,000+ modules, 300,000 downloads a month, 1.5M Module developers can get funded from LSD. The 15,000 modules are maintained by the community. Patches go through a workflow before they reaches me. People have taken Drupal in sorts of directions, e.g., political campaigns, elearning platforms, etc.

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Real learning – let’s not confuse it with completing templated exercises

Charles Jennings

Learning professionals spend a significant amount of their time (maybe even the majority) designing and delivering content and then evaluating completions and short-term memory outputs from structured mandatory and compliance training modules and courses. I read a piece written by Kate Graham of e2train on Thursday and it started me thinking about the ‘real learning versus managed learning’ debate.