2016

The Top 200 Tools for Learning 2016 is announced

Jane Hart

It was in 2007 that I compiled the first Top 100 Tools for Learning from the votes of learning professionals worldwide and have done so every year since then. This year to mark the 10th anniversary I have compiled the TOP 200 TOOLS FOR LEARNING 2016. The full list appears in the left-hand sidebar; follow the links to find out more about each of the tools. The slideset of the Top 200 Tools is embedded at the bottom of this page. Social learning

Tools 220

Group cohesiveness & individual effort

Dave Snowden

I’ll never forget the first time I saw the murmuration of starlings. I’d arrived at the Hilton in Rome which overlooks St Peters. The family were joining me later for a weekend’s holiday which would include a Welsh defeat of the Italians in the Six Nations. It was the early evening and I went out onto the balcony and watched it for the next hour or so with a sense of awe.

Groups 204
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Flows, Fragility and Friction

John Hagel

I’ve long been a fan of flows but, in the spirit of paradox, I’ve also been a fan of friction. But, wait a minute, friction slows down flows – how could I possibly favor both flows and friction? Until recently, I hadn’t even been really aware of the paradox in my perspective, much less thought systematically about ways to resolve the paradox.

[iab] Robert Scoble

David Weinberger

I’m at a IAB conference in Toronto. The first speaker is Robert Scoble , who I haven’t seen since the early 2000s. He’s working at Upload VR that gives him “a front row seat on what’s coming.” ” WARNING : Live blogging. Not spellpchecking before posting. Not even re-reading it. Getting things wrong, including emphasis. The title of his talk is “The Fourth Transformation: How AR and AI change everything.” ” First: The PC.

Is Design Thinking the “New Liberal Arts”?

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Design thinking has become an increasingly popular topic of discussion over the past decade. It was featured in the September, 2015 issue of the Harvard Business Review with several articles on the subject. Design is no longer just for physical objects, e.g. cars, bridges, shoes, jewelry, smartphones. Design thinking is now being applied to abstract entities, - e.g. systems, services, information and organizations, - as well as to devise strategies, manage change and solve complex problems.

Design 161

Kaihan Krippendorff Keynote Mindmap

Clark Quinn

At a private event, I had a chance to hear Kaihan Krippendorff talk about thinking differently about innovation. He used an 8P’s model as a framework to illustrate how to think differently.

Adaptive Learners, Not Adaptive Learning

George Siemens

Some variation of adaptive or personalized learning is rumoured to “disrupt” education in the near future. Adaptive courseware providers have received extensive funding and this emerging marketplace has been referred to as the “holy grail” of education (Jose Ferreira at an EdTech Innovation conference that I hosted in Calgary in 2013).

More Trending

taking back our society

Harold Jarche

Monopolies & the Human Condition “When monopolies succeed, the people fail …”, Henry Demarist Lloyd wrote in March 1881, denouncing the practices of Rockefeller’s Standard Oil. Almost a century later, John Kenneth Galbraith warned of the dangers of blindly having faith in our capital market system and the organizations and institutions that support it. The greater. Read more » Communities Work

System 215

Who controls the marketing tech stack in 2017: The CIO or CMO?

Dion Hinchcliffe

A funny thing happened along the way to using technology to better connect with the marketplace: The CIO and CMO both decided to have a hand in it. How will they agree and align in 2017 as digital becomes central to the end-to-end customer experience

Top 10 Tools for Learning 2016

Luis Suarez

Every year, and for the last 10 years, which is a huge achievement in this day and age, if you ask me, Jane Hart puts together this wonderful list of Top 100 Tools for Learning , where she encourages everyone to fill in a form , or tweet further along, or even create your own blog post, where you’d be listing your Top 10 Tools for Learning, indicating whether each of those tools would be fitting in under the following categories: .

Tools 199

Jane’s Top 10 Tools for Learning 2016

Jane Hart

On Friday 23rd September, voting closes in the 10th Annual Survey of Learning Tool – so it’s not too late to vote! You can find out how to do so HERE – essentially it involves sharing your own Top 10 Tools for Learning – anonymously or publicly.

Tools 184

Freedom through constraints

Dave Snowden

Over the last couple of weeks I’ve been thinking a lot about constraints in the context of complexity in general and cynefin more specifically. I’ve long used a constraint based definition to understand the differences between order, complexity and chaos. I got the original idea from Alicia Juarrero and subsequently developed it into Cynefin itself. That included the idea of enabling constraints as a key aspect of complex system.

System 201

United We Stand, Divided We Fall

John Hagel

I love paradox and today we’re living through one of the biggest paradoxes of all: at a time when we seem more divided than ever, we’re actually more united than ever. What do I mean by that? All you have to do is take a cursory look through our media or our conversations when we come together as groups to see that we’re deeply polarized. We not only disagree with the views of the other side, but dismiss the people articulating those views as evil, sick or ignorant beyond belief.

Keeping MOOCs open—platforms vs. protocols

David Weinberger

Tarun Vagani reports that Coursera has served notice that it is closing its archive of prior MOOCs (massive open online courses). As Coursera put it in an email: Effective June 30, 2016, courses on the old platform will no longer be available. Also, Coursera is phasing out its free certificates to those who successfully complete a course, according to CourseraJunkie. There’s nothing wrong with a MOOC platform charging for whatever they want to charge for.

Course 158

Has AI (Finally) Reached a Tipping Point?

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

After many years of promise and hype, AI seems to be finally reaching a tipping point of market acceptance. Artificial intelligence is suddenly everywhere… it is proliferating like mad.” So starts a Vanity Fair article published around two years ago by author and radio host Kurt Andersen.

Tips 146

Augmenting AR for Learning

Clark Quinn

We’re hearing more and more about AR (Augmented Reality), and one of it’s core elements is layering information on top of the world. But in a conversation the other night, it occurred to me that we could push that information to be even more proactive in facilitating learning. And this comes from the use of models. The key idea I want to leverage is the use of models to foster is the use of models to predict or explain what happens in the world.

The Future of Learning: Digital, Distributed, Data-Driven

George Siemens

Yesterday as I was traveling (with free wifi from the good folks at Norwegian Air, I might add), I caught this tweet from Jim Groom: @dkernohan @cogdog @mweller A worthwhile think piece for sure, almost up there with "China is My Analytics Co-Pilot" — Jim Groom (@jimgroom) May 11, 2016. The comment was in response to my previous post where I detailed my interest in understanding how learning analytics were progressing in Chinese education.

Data 146

Gord Downie and the New Marathon of Hope

Dan Pontefract

Thirty-six years ago I watched Terry Fox run by me near Hamilton, Ontario. I was nine-years old. Both that moment and Terry’s tenacity–a man running across Canada with an amputated leg to raise money for cancer research–had a profound impact on my life. Rarely does a week go by when I don’t think about Terry. Indeed his gift is forever green.

countering fascist thinking

Harold Jarche

Jason Kottke reviewed an article by the philosopher Umberto Eco and summarized it as 14 features of eternal fascism. “These features cannot be organized into a system; many of them contradict each other, and are also typical of other kinds of despotism or fanaticism. But it is enough that one of them be present to. Read more » Democracy

A new generation of CIO thinking emerges

Dion Hinchcliffe

As both business leadership and investment in technology grows outside the IT department in a era of large generational technology shifts, CIOs are considering new ways to think about the nature and role of IT

How Social Networking Tools Enable Heutagogy in Learning Organisations

Luis Suarez

. Imagine one day you read this quote: ‘ The way we teach in our schools isn’t the way I think you create successful (and happy) adults, it’s the way you create the society we’ve had until now.’ Now imagine you swap the wordings ’ teaching ’ for ‘learning’ and ‘our schools’ for ‘ our workplaces ’. Read it out loud again, please. Slowly.

The Social Media Revolution continues: Socialnomics 2017

Jane Hart

This morning I awoke to find this tweet: Hi! C4LPT @hjarche @MelMilloway @bschlenker @marciamarcia @jerrymichalski @DonaldClark @DonaldHTaylor What are ur fav videos on learning? Mark Oehlert (@moehlert) November 29, 2016. My immediate response was to point to one of Erik Qualman’s videos on the Social Media Revolution, which although not specifically about learning show the impact that social media is having on education and learning in general.

Video 173

In the salt marsh

Dave Snowden

I’m still working on the new use of coupling and boundary constraints for Cynefin so readers will have to wait a few days for that. So I thought I would continue by theme of yesterday, namely the organisational use of narrative. I’m also saving myself a double task as I need to write some of this up for the client I was working with in San Jose this week.

What's the Future of Jobs?

John Hagel

What better time to reflect on the future of work and jobs than Labor Day? I’ve written about this extensively with my latest foray on a recent blog post. Is STEM our future? Today, I want to be a contrarian. The conventional wisdom is that the best way to prepare students for the future of work is through a STEM education (science, technology, engineering and math), although a few might recommend STEAM (adding art as a token concession to the quantitative basket).

Making library miscellaneousness awesome

David Weinberger

Sitterwerk Art Library in St. Gallen, Switzerland, has 19,000 publicly-accessible items on its shelves in no particular order. This video explains why that is a brilliant approach. And then the story just gets better and better. Werkbank from Astrom / Zimmer on Vimeo. That the shelves have no persistent order doesn’t mean they have no order. Rather, works are reshelved by users in the clusters the users have created for their research.

The Evolution of the Firm

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

A few weeks ago I discussed The Rise of the Global Superstar Company based on a recent special report on the subject by The Economist. The report noted that the decade-long trend toward increasingly concentrated global firms is somewhat surprising. . The rise of the giants is a reversal of recent history… In the 1980s and 1990s management gurus pointed to the demise of size as big companies seemed to be giving way to a much more entrepreneurial economy.

Cost 145

Deeper Design: Working out Loud and the Future of Work

Clark Quinn

Over the past year, I’ve been working on a project. After I wrote the Deeper eLearning series of 6 posts with Learnnovators , we wondered what to do next. We decided to do a course together, free-to-air, and write about the process as well (a bit of Working Out Loud), with the intention was to try to do deep design on a pragmatic basis. And, just as a hint, the topic is the Future of Work, the choice of which is part of the story.

Design 146

How Feminists Are Costing Dems Gen Y

Nine Shift

The Democratic Party is losing Gen Y. And Feminists are playing a huge role in costing Democrats the majority of Gen Y. It began with Madeline Albright telling Gen Y women there's a special hell for them if they don't vote for Mrs. Clinton. Here's the latest. The Washington Post via Fox News reports , "University of Michigan has implemented a “designated pronoun” policy to allow students to choose the way they want their professors to refer to them in class.

Cost 132

Gord Downie May Be The Best High School Teacher I Never Had

Dan Pontefract

It’s been some time since I patrolled the jaundice-colored halls of my high school. Those were awkward days. Acne, Bunsen burner fiascos and infamous air band “talent shows” were iffy memories for me. With all due respect to Mr. Baxter and any other teacher of Saltfleet High School in Stoney Creek, Ontario, I think Gord Downie is (and was) a far better educator. As the lead singer and lyricist of the Tragically Hip , Downie has been writing the band’s lyrics since the late 1980’s.

Sample 155

self-organization is the future

Harold Jarche

If we as a society think it is important that citizens are engaged, people are passionate about their work, and that we all contribute to making a better world, then we need to enable self-organization. Central planning and hierarchical decision-making are just too slow and ineffective, especially for complex situations involving lots of people. In my network learning model, people constantly navigate between social networks, communities of practice, and work teams.

Open Learning Analytics. Again

George Siemens

Several years ago, a group of us wrote a concept paper on Open Learning Analytics (.pdf). Our goal was to create openness as a foundation for the use of data and analytics in education. We have, it appears, largely failed to have our vision take root. Few things are more important in education today than the development of an open platform for analytics of learning data. It’s a data-centric world. Data, and the analysis of that data, are a rapidly emerging economic value layer.

Fake ad sources on Facebook

Doc Searls

Nearly all the ads I see on Facebook are ones like these two, next to Mark Zuckerberg’s latest post : Besides being false and misleading clickbait, they are not from espn.com. They’re from [link] , and bait for a topic switch:to pitching a diet supplement called Alpha Fuel. The pages with the pitches are made to look like ESPN ones, logos and all. But they’re fake. I would think it can’t be too hard to prevent this kind of obviously dishonest and misleading s**t.

Modern Professional Learning (MPL) meets Modern Workplace Learning (MWL)

Jane Hart

Modern Professional Learning (MPL), an approach which many professionals are now (consciously or unconsciously) adopting, involves taking responsibility for their own career and self-development through continuous learning, on demand problem solving and getting the most out of their daily work. A large part of it happens, of course, outside of their organisation – primarily on the Web.

The domain of disorder (ii)

Dave Snowden

Most people who have walked in the mountains will have experienced a temperature inversion at some stage. You suddenly discover yourself standing above a sea of cloud with the odd peak visible but the vast majority of the landscape. All is quiet, all mysterious the opposite of Frost’s wonderfully evocative line The line-storm clouds fly tattered and swift.

The Unmet Need for Trusted Talent Advisors

John Hagel

In a world that’s changing ever more rapidly, we all need trusted advisors. It’s a significant unmet need that creates a very attractive business opportunity. This has been a central part of my research and writing for almost 20 years since I published a book on the topic, Net Worth. Most recently, I returned to this subject in a blog post. Today I want to make an important distinction between two major trusted advisor opportunities.

Will blockchain kill culture?

David Weinberger

Peter Brantley [ @naypinya ] has posted a succinct warning about the effect blockchain technology may have on culture: by making the mechanism of trust cheap, transparent, and more reliable, blockchain could destroy the ambiguity that culture needs in order to thrive. It is clearly thought and powerfully put. Pardon me while I agree with him, including agreeing on blockchain’s positive promise.

Blockchain Can Reshape Financial Services… But it Will Take Significant Time and Investment

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

In early August, the World Economic Forum (WEF) published two excellent reports: A Blueprint for Digital Identity , - which I wrote about a few weeks ago, - and The future of financial infrastructure: An ambitious look at how blockchain can reshape financial services , - which I’d now like to discuss.