2013

Social Learning Handbook 2014

Jane Hart

It’s now 3 years since I published the Social Learning Handbook – and a lot has changed, so I am now working on a new version.

The Puzzling Technology Adoption Discrepancy Between Individuals and Institutions

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Since the publication of its first report in 2009, I’ve closely followed the Shift Index initiative of Deloitte’s Center for the Edge.

Favourite Books of 2013 That I Read

Dan Pontefract

I like to read. As it turns out I like to eat Pecan Pie as well, but that’s not why you’re here. In a previous post this week I outlined a compendium of articles and write-ups from 2013 that I thought were truly brain candy for a cerebral Canadian like me.

Review 207

Latest global comparison of household Internet speeds

Ross Dawson

The speed at which we can access the internet is important. Very important. I’ve written before on the evidence that internet bandwidth is a key driver of economic growth and online participation , and there is plenty of other research to point to its role in social value creation.

Big Data Reveal Three Surprising Facts About Chinese Censorship

Andy McAfee

I went to a stellar presentation last week by Gary King , a political scientist at Harvard and director of the school’s Institute for Quantitative Social Science.

Data 207

More Trending

The Innovation of Loneliness

Luis Suarez

[2b2k] Back when not every question had an answer

David Weinberger

Let me remind you young whippersnappers what looking for knowledge was like before the Internet (or “hiphop” as I believe you call it). Cast your mind back to 1982, when your Mommy and Daddy weren’t even gleams in each other’s eyes.

Great is the power of steady misrepresentation

Dave Snowden

I promised yesterday to clarify some aspects of Cynefin. This was triggered by Roger's Linked In post and some of the response (reported yesterday) but it is not a specific response. Rather see it as a summary of multiple responses both articulated or otherwise over the last few years.

My daily PKM routine (practices and toolset)

Jane Hart

Harold Jarche is a leading authority on Personal Knowledge Management, which he describes as a set of processes, individually constructed, to help each of us make sense of our world, and work more effectively.

PKM 207

Some Thoughts on the Affordable Care Act

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

My friend and former IBM colleague John Patrick posted a very good entry in his blog on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) , aka Obamacare. As we all know, the ACA has had a rough start. In his entry, John asks two basic questions: do we need the ACA?; and, should it be repealed?

System 207

The TED of all Leadership Management Conferences – A Review of the Drucker Forum 2013

Dan Pontefract

Once in a while, you get inspired by events in your life that seem to be a precursor to real societal change. A hopeful change. A needed change. An evolutionary change.

Review 207

“Shoezam” app mimics Shazam to image, identify, and replicate shoes on the street

Ross Dawson

This morning I attended the Innovation Bay breakfast on Where to for retail now? It was a fascinating discussion, which was definitely useful as I develop my forthcoming Future of Retail framework. Still working on it, I don’t know when it will be ready for the public, more later.).

Buy 207

In Memoriam: Chris Argyris

Andy McAfee

“When a sage dies all are his kin and should mourn the passing.” ” – The Talmud. One day in about 2007, Chris Argyris walked into my office at Harvard Business School, where I was teaching at the time.

Losing Aaron Swartz

Doc Searls

Aaron Swartz died yesterday, a suicide at 26. Though we weren’t close buddies, I always felt a kinship with Aaron, in part because we were living demographic bookends. At many of the events we both attended, at least early on, he was the youngest person there, and I was the oldest.

70:20:10 - A Framework for High Performance Development Practices

Charles Jennings

Over the past few years the 70:20:10 model for development has captured the imagination of organisations across the world. Some organisations apply 70:20:10 principles to targeted and specific development solutions.

2.0 on the outside but 1.0 on the inside

Euen Semple

When I came up with the caption on the slide in the photo above I was thinking about organisations but it occurred to me tonight that it applies at least as much to us as individuals.

IBM’s Client Experience Jam Is Now History

Luis Suarez

You may have noticed how over the course of the last few days, things have been a bit too quiet over here in this blog and for a good reason.

Fun fact – Impressionist edition

David Weinberger

According to Ross King’s excellent The Judgment of Paris , there was a day in the summer of 1874 when Manet showed up at Monet’s home and painted The Manet Family in their Garden at Argenteuil , a scene of Manet’s wife and daughter, and him puttering around in the garden.

203

Menlo Park Syndrome

Martijn Linssen

Psychologists refer to something called the capture-bonding psychological trait, something Wikipedia claims may ‘lie behind battered-wife syndrome, military basic training, fraternity hazing,’ and so forth. That reference to basic training is illuminating.

The Next Generation of Workplace Learning Practices in the Age of Knowledge Sharing and Collaboration

Jane Hart

Cognitive Systems and Big-Data-driven Applications

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

In the first week of October I participated in a Cognitive Systems Colloquium hosted by IBM at its Thomas J. Watson Research Center.

System 207

Kudos Jacques Godin, an Engaged Air Canada Employee

Dan Pontefract

Note: I sent the following letter into Air Canada’s ‘customer relations’ group today and in the spirit of being open, I thought I’d share it here as well. ———— Hello there, I fly a lot.

Why your networks and collaboration are at the heart of the value you create

Ross Dawson

I was recently interviewed for an extended article Networked Business: The wealth in your connections written by Nick Saalfeld for the Microsoft Talking Business series. Here are some excerpts from the article, which provide a neat summary of some of my thinking on the space.

The Virtuous Cycle of Existing Theory and Big Data

Andy McAfee

In recent decades a ton of research has led to the conclusion that while some aspects of our personalities change over time, others are remarkably stable.

Data 207

TV 3.0

Doc Searls

We’re not watching any less TV. In fact, we’re watching more of it, on more different kinds of screens. Does this mean that TV absorbs the Net, or vice versa? Or neither? That’s what I’m exploring here. TV 1.0: The Antenna Age.

Workplace Learning: Adding, Embedding & Extracting

Charles Jennings

High performing individuals, teams and organisations focus on exploiting development opportunities in the workplace because that’s where most of the learning happens.

Standing up for trivia

Euen Semple

It is so easy to sneer. Easy to sneer at newbies. Easy to sneer at other people''s "rubbish". Easy to sneer at what other people do with social media. I try not to. One person''s trivia is someone else''s context. How can I trust you if all you do is 140 character press releases?

Radical Transparency in the Era of Open Business

Luis Suarez

In a work context, I have always been fascinated by transparency. And, lately, even more about radical transparency.

Learning How to Learn

Kevin Wheeler

can say that Muad’Dib learned rapidly because his first training was in how to learn. And the first lesson of all was the basic trust that he could learn.

How To 191

MOOCs: How did we get here?

George Siemens

I’m at the Open Education conference in Park City, Utah. The conference is now in its impressive 10th year. I did a presentation following Andrew Ng (Coursera). Slides and video are below.

5 principles for a successful formal online social learning experience – and it’s not about the tools

Jane Hart

There has been a lot of talk about the use of social media tools in formal workplace learning; and I am regularly asked to review initiatives of this kind.

The Era of Cognitive Computing

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Tools have played a central role in human evolution since our ancestors first developed hand axes and similar such stone tools a few million years ago.

Should Companies Allow Facebook at Work?

Dan Pontefract

Late last year I was at a dinner with a Board I won’t mention by name. There were roughly 50 people at the event. Tables were pre-assigned and I found myself sitting across from a chap in his mid-50′s whose professional job was an accountant. He worked at a rather large firm as a partner.

As more jobs are automated, how many of us will still have productive work?

Ross Dawson

There has been a lot of press the last few days about a paper The Future of Employment: How Susceptible Are Jobs to Computerisation? published by the Oxford Martin Programme on the Impacts of Future Technology.