2014

Library as a platform: Chattanooga

David Weinberger

I finally got to see the Chattanooga Library. It was even better than I’d expected. In fact, you can see the future of libraries emerging there. That’s not to say that you can simply list what it’s doing and do the same things and declare yourself the Library of the Future. Rather, Chattanooga Library has turned itself into a platform. That’s where the future is, not in the particular programs and practices that happen to emerge from that platform.

SAFe: the infantilism of management

Dave Snowden

I gave the opening keynote at the Agile conference in Brno today. A good audience in that they paid attention and were thoughtful. I tried a slightly different approach to the subject starting with some of the biology and cognitive stuff, dealing with complexity in a simplified format and majoring on SenseMaker® as a way to create continuous feedback loops between users and developers with the intent of enabling both co-evolution and exaptation.

Class 220

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Why Do We Need Data Science when We’ve Had Statistics for Centuries?

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Data Science is emerging as as one of the hottest new professions and academic disciplines in these early years of the 21st century. A number of articles have noted that the demand for data scientists is racing ahead of supply. People with the necessary skills are scarce, primarily because the discipline is so new. But, the situation is rapidly changing, as universities around the world have started to offer different kinds of graduate programs in data science.

The vulnerability of learning

George Siemens

In a meeting with a group of doctoral students last week, one individual shared her challenging, even emotionally draining, experience in taking her first doctoral course. Much of her experience was not focused on the learning or content. Instead, she shared her self-doubts, her frustrations of integrating doctoral studies into her personal and professional life, the fatigue of learning, and feeling overwhelmed.

Holacracy Is Not The Answer To Your Employee Disengagement Issues

Dan Pontefract

If you’re located in parts of North America where it’s been too cold to even blink your eyes lately, you may not have seen the news. Holacracy is the new black. Holacracy? In a nutshell, Holacracy is an organizational structure — initially devised by self-described “recovering CEO” Brian Robertson of HolacracyOne — that purports to do the following: Holacracy is a distributed authority system – a set of “ rules of the game ” that bake empowerment into the core of the organization.

Issues 218

A 21st Century Global Declaration of Independence

John Hagel

When in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for individuals to dissolve the institutional bands which have connected them with another , and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of humankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

Are Instructional Designers Making Themselves Irrelevant?

Xyleme

How PowerPoint Is Ruining Higher Ed, Explained in One PowerPoint [link] via @slate — Dawn Poulos (@dawnpoulos) March 7, 2014. I''ve read a lot of articles about the disadvantages of PowerPoint—how it stifles discussion, critical thinking, and thoughtful decision making—but no article conveys the agony of sitting through a slide presentation better or more humorously than this one.

Design 211

More Trending

What Jelly Means

Steven Berlin Johnson

A few months ago, I found this strange white mold growing in my garden in California. I’m a novice gardener, and to make matters worse, a novice Californian, so I had no idea what these small white cells might portend for my flowers. . This is one of those odd blank spots -- I used the call them Googleholes in the early days of the service -- where the usual Delphic source of all knowledge comes up relatively useless.

ASTD no more

Jay Cross

The American Society for Training and Development has ceased to exist. Now it’s the Association for Talent Development. I have mixed feelings about this. Tony Bingham announces name change in Washington, May 6, 2014. This is hardly the first time this professional association has taken on a new name. In 1947, it came to life as the American Society of Training Directors.

A Swiss Army Knife for the Network Era

Harold Jarche

PKM: A Swiss Army knife for the Network Era. It’s beginning to look like the Swiss Army knife of the network era.

What blogging was

David Weinberger

At a recent Fellows Hour at the Berkman Center the topic was something like “Whatever happened to blogging?,” ” with the aim of thinking about how Berkman can take better advantage of blogging as a platform for public discussion. Fellow Hours are private. No, this is not ironic.) They asked me to begin with some reflections on what blogging once was, because I am old. Rather than repeating what I said, here are some thoughts heavily influenced by the discussion.

Small countries, big ideas

Dave Snowden

For the last year with Bangor University and the Welsh Audit Office I've been working on our Small Countries Big Ideas initiative. The basic idea is to create a series of properly researched programmes using SenseMaker® in the areas of health, social services and development. In all these areas we have existing projects and a lot of excitement.

A Growing Backlash Against the Relentless Advances in Technology?

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Otherwise serious concepts sometimes end up as overused buzzwords. If the books and articles that introduced them become popular, the concepts can get stretched and applied way beyond their intended meaning. The business world is particularly awash with such trendy buzzwords. After a while, most of them quietly return to their academic roots or disappear altogether, and the public moves on to the next popular buzzword.

What will universities monetize in the future?

George Siemens

Universities do more than teach. Research is one of the most important activities of higher education. From the lens of students and society, however, the teaching and learning process and what it costs, is the primary focus. The university economic and operational structure, in relation to educating learners, can be seen as consisting of three legs of a stool: content/curriculum, teaching, and assessment.

Can Humanism Replace Capitalism?

Dan Pontefract

Can humanism replace capitalism? Can capitalism be fought back by a new sense of purpose? Not in my lifetime. It’s sad. Really, it is. Can humanism — the concept of value, meaning and purpose — be interwoven in parallel with capitalism? That *may* have a fighting chance. We first need to revisit the terms business, company, corporation and capitalism.

Class 215

The Disruption Debate - What's Missing?

John Hagel

I admit that I’m mystified by Jill Lepore’s article in the New Yorker attacking Clayton Christensen and his theory of disruptive innovation. Not only does it have a meanness that isn’t warranted, but it leaves the reader with an unanswered question: if Clay's theories are not helpful (and I still believe they are), how do we explain the cascading disruptions that are playing out in markets and industries around the world?

Trends 211

Why you need to take a Google Analytics approach to measuring learning

Xyleme

Post Type: Blog post. Did you know that, according to Bersin, less than half of the L&D organizations they survey feel they are perceived by their stakeholder leadership as a strategic business partner? read more. Learning & Development

Neil deGrasse Tyson #DevLearn Keynote Mindmap

Clark Quinn

Neil deGrasse Tyson opened this year’s DevLearn conference. A clear crowd favorite, folks lined up to get in (despite the huge room). In a engaging, funny, and poignant talk, he made a great case for science and learning. strategy technology

Timeline of Emerging Science and Technology: A visual framework

Ross Dawson

My colleague and friend Richard Watson and I have created a number of visual frameworks together, including Trend Blend 2007+ based on the London tube map, which has spawned many imitators over the years. Since Richard has moved back to London we’ve collaborated less on frameworks, however Richard has continued to do some marvellous work.

Would you recommend your L&D department?

Jay Cross

Capturing L&D metrics too often entails asking the wrong people the wrong questions at the wrong time. Line leaders are a CLO’s most important customers. They judge the trade-offs in spending that determine L&D’s fate in the budget process. They base their decisions on what training professionals call Level 4: Did the training impact the bottom line? Did it matter? By and large, line leaders are not happy with L&D’s performance.

Pre-empting automation

Harold Jarche

There is a lot of talk in the mainstream media about the increasing automation of work and jobs. I have discussed automation and outsourcing here for several years and it’s fairly obvious that standardized work will keep getting automated, by software or robots.

The Blogosphere lives!

David Weinberger

There was a reason we used that ridiculous word to refer to the loose collection of bloggers: Back in the early 2000s, we were reading one another’s blogs, responding to them, and linking to them. Blogging was a conversational form made solid by links. It’s time to get back to that. At least for me. Tweeting’s great. I love Twitter. And I love the weird conversational form it enables.

Thinking simply, in context

Dave Snowden

One of the common social media comments post a Cognitive Edge course (especially when I run it) is that people'r brains hurt; it's normally a compliment. As I said yesterday on the final day of this week's London programme the issue is to think differently, then its all pretty simple. This is generally true of any paradigm shift in the history of ideas.

Disruptive Innovation Revisited

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

The recent New Yorker article, - The Disruption Machine: What the gospel of innovation gets wrong , - by Harvard history professor Jill Lepore , has led to a flurry of opinions on disruptive innovation. The New Yorker described the article as “Rethinking the innovation craze.” Others called it an “absolutely devastating takedown of disruptive innovation,” a concept that Lepore said is a “competitive strategy for an age seized by terror.”

I now have a Canadian Father

George Siemens

Over two years ago, I complained about the cruel and frustrating rejection of my dad’s Canadian citizenship. It has been a long process. It is deeply discouraging to see your parent frightened and stressed that he will be sent back to a country that hasn’t been his home for over 40 years, leaving behind children and grandchildren. The recent immigration discussion in the USA takes on a new meaning in the light of this experience. In our case, my dad was a Canadian citizen.

Let’s Stop Penalizing the Dreamers

Dan Pontefract

I had a wonderful, powerful get-together the other day with a friend of mine. Like me, he’s a dreamer. It was a chat long overdue. We hadn’t shared a latte for well over twelve months. “ Aaron ” and I met about six years ago and from that first moment I felt a sense of connected kinship. Our discussions are futuristic, fun and absolutely freeing. For me they are soul food exchanges. When we chat, we seek ways to better our respective organizations and society in general.

The Big Shift in Influence

John Hagel

Influence is becoming more and more challenging.   It’s hard enough to attract attention, much less retain it or use that attention to shape the behavior of others. And yet, in a world of scarce resources and mounting pressure, the ability to influence others becomes more and more central to the ability to set big things in motion. In my last blog post , I talked about the increasing strategic importance of influence points for institutions. 

The path to learning personalization

Xyleme

Post Type: Blog post. Personalization is one of those big, broad terms that can mean different things to different people. I''m a big fan of how Richard Culatta from the US Department of Education defines it. He says personalization is the sum of three factors: adjusting the pace (individualization), adjusting the approach (differentiation), and connecting those to the learner''s interests and experiences. read more. Learning & Development

Types 198

Extending Mobile Models

Clark Quinn

In preparation for a presentation, I was reviewing my mobile models. You may recall I started with my 4C ‘s model (Content, Compute, Communicate, & Capture), and have mapped that further onto Augmenting Formal, Performance Support, Social, & Contextual. I’ve refined it as well, separating out contextual and social as different ways of looking at formal and performance support.

Enterprise 2.0, Finally?

Andy McAfee

Facebook’s recent announcement that it’s readying a version of its social software for workplaces got me thinking about Enterprise 2.0, a topic I used to think a great deal about. Five years ago I published a book with that title, arguing that enterprise social software platforms would be valuable tools for businesses.

Want Results? Champion the Informal

Jay Cross

First published in Chief Learning Officer magazine, February 2013. Formal gets all the money, but today more learning happens outside the classroom. Learning is more important than ever. We have an information explosion. The world is becoming more complex. We have to learn more just to keep living our lives. That doesn’t mean we need training departments — and that’s where the budgets are cut. We need to pay more attention to experiential learning, We need to look at peer-to-peer learning.

The post-hierarchical organization

Harold Jarche

The way we manage our organizations is largely ineffective for the complex challenges we face, whether driven by the environment, demographics, economics, or politics. Hierarchies assume that management knows best and that the higher up the hierarchy, the more competent and knowledgeable that person is. But hierarchies are merely centralized networks. They work well when information flows mostly in one direction: down. Hierarchies are good for command and control.

A gift from God

David Weinberger

I know I’m late to the love fest, but I’ve been under the flu. I read Pope Francis’ Message for World Communication Day when it was issued on Jan. 24, and I only get happier upon re-reading it. NOTE please that I am outside of my comfort zone in this posting, for two reasons. First, I am not a Christian and I know I may be misreading the Pope’s words. Second, I am going to evaluate and expound on what a Pope says. Chutzpah * has a new poster boy!

Please not more of the same (1 of 3)

Dave Snowden

Last month Paul Tudor alerted me to a 2012 McKindsey report Delivering large-scale IT projects on time, on budget, and on value. I pulled it out yesterday as I wanted to read it for my opening keynote at the Global Scrum Gathering in Berlin next week. In that keynote I plan to talk about issues of scaling a complex system and how to engage the 'C' level beyond IT management. The report is two years old but I doubt things have changed that much so it gives me some key data.

Reflections on Bitcoin

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Ever since I joined Citigroup as a strategic advisor in March of 2008, I’ve been spending a lot of time thinking about the ongoing transition toward a global digital money ecosystem. For over 2,500 years , money has played a central role in the rise of civilizations and in human affairs of all kinds. As a result, the historical transition to digital money is among the most exciting and important societal challenges in the coming decades.

Issues 217

Open Learning Analytics

George Siemens

The future of systems such as business, government, and education will be data centric. Historically, humanity has made sense of the world through discourse, dialogue, artifacts, myth, story, and metaphor. While those sensemaking approaches won’t disappear, they will be augmented by data and analytics. Educators often find analytics frustrating. After all, how can you analyze the softer aspects of learning?

My Next Role Is …

Dan Pontefract

To each there comes in their lifetime a special moment when they are figuratively tapped on the shoulder and offered the chance to do a very special thing, unique to them and fitted to their talents. What a tragedy if that moment finds them unprepared or unqualified for that which could have been their finest hour. Sir Winston Churchill. I could read Churchill all day. And Yeats, Frost, Handy, Drucker, and so on … but that’s not why you’re here.