2017

Systems thinking & complexity

Dave Snowden

A recent post by Sonja caused some reaction in social media and I promised to write something to clarify my position the subject. Now I should say up front that a lot of this is finding labels for things that are different, not the denigration of other methods and tools. Saying that one thing is different from anther does not mean that one thing is better than the other. That is the essence of the Cynefin framework, to say that things are right or wrong within boundaries.

Robocalypse Now? Technology, Productivity and Employment

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Is the Robocalypse upon us?, asked MIT economist David Autor in his presentation at a recent Forum of European central bankers. His presentation was based on a paper co-written with Utrecht University economist Anna Salomons. “Is productivity growth inimical to employment?,”

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An Engaged Culture Improves Performance, Not The Other Way Around

Dan Pontefract

A vice-president approached me one day after I finished delivering a keynote. The talk was focused on organizational culture. He was friendly, but rather cocky. The first. Dan's Related Posts: The Link Between Leadership, Learning & Organizational Performance Employee Engagement is Still Poor but it Does Drive Bottom Line Results Lessons In Culture From United Airlines If Your Enterprise Social Network Is A Ghost Town It’s Probably Due To Your… Do You Work With A Bully?

Books Every Entrepreneur Should Read in 2018

John Hagel

This 2018, take some time out to refresh and recharge. For me, that often means stealing a few quiet moments with my book, hiding out…er…I mean, hanging out on my couch, or comfortably wedged into a window seat listening to an audiobook on a long flight. But it can be tough to fully disengage from the parts of your work that are exciting, or even stressful. I think there’s a happy medium.

Before the Course

Clark Quinn

It appears that, too often, people are building courses when they don’t need to (or, more importantly, shouldn’t ). I realize that there are pressures to make a course when one is requested, including expectations and familiarity, but really, you should be doing some initial thinking about what makes sense. So here’s a rough guide about the thinking you should do before you course. You begin with a performance problem.

Course 165

Learning Analytics Courses

George Siemens

After about a year of planning, we can finally announce the following courses on edX focusing on learning analytics. The intent of these courses is to eventually lead into a MicroMasters and then advance placement in an in-development Masters of Science in Learning Analytics at UTA. Each course runs about three weeks and we’ve tried to settle on prominent analytics tools for educational data so the experience is one where skills can immediately be applied.

The digital transformation of learning: Social, informal, self-service, and enjoyable

Dion Hinchcliffe

Technology has long been used to improve how we learn, but today's digital advances, particularly with social media, have taken learning in powerful new -- and for some -- entirely unexpected directions

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The Keynesian Marketplace of Ideas

David Weinberger

The awesome Tim Hwang (disclosure: I am a complete fanboy) has posted an essay. arguing that we should take something like a Keynesian approach to the “marketplace of ideas” that we were promised with the Internet. I think there’s something really helpful about this, but that ultimately the metaphor gets in the way of itself.

thinking about facebook

Harold Jarche

Facebook dominates online social networking. That one company has such global influence should be of concern to all of us. Our social networks define us, as Christakis & Fowler clearly showed in their 2011 book, Connected. Most of us are already aware of the direct effect we have on our friends and family; our actions can make them happy or sad, healthy or sick, even rich or poor. But we rarely consider that everything we think, feel, do, or say can spread far beyond the people we know.

Data is the New Love

Doc Searls

Personal data, that is. Because it’s good to give away—but only if you mean it. And it’s bad to take it, even it seems to be there for the taking. I bring this up because a quarter million pages (so far) on the Web say it “data is the new oil.” ” That’s because a massive personal data extraction industry has grown up around the simple fact that our data is there for the taking. Or so it seems. To them. And their apologists.

Data 206

A sheep in wolves clothing

Dave Snowden

Nothing pleases people more than to go on thinking what they have always thought, and at the same time imagine that they are thinking something new and daring: it combines the advantage of security and the delight of adventure. I finished off my last keynote of the year with the above quote from T S Elliot. Its one of my favourite ones and its all too true, all too often, in all too many contexts.

Platforms, Blockchains, and the Evolution of Trust

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

“In primitive economies, people traded mostly with members of their village and community,” wrote David Brooks in a June, 2014 NY Times OpEd, - The Evolution of Trust. “Trust was face to face. Then, in the mass economy we’ve been used to, people bought from large and stable corporate brands, whose behavior was made more reliable by government regulation. But now there is a new trust calculus, powered by both social and economic forces.”.

Why I Will Never Use Uber Ever Again

Dan Pontefract

As early as 2014 I had heard the rumblings of male chauvinism at Uber headquarters. There were even whispers of misogyny. But the world seemed to be smitten. Dan's Related Posts: How To Build A Truly Purpose-Driven Company Through The Example Of Stocksy The First Step To Improving Employee Engagement Is To Connect With Your Team The Iconic Leader: Stage 4 of 5 in the Leadership Tonic Scale Should Employees Schedule Time To Be Social? The Anti-Social Social Dilemma.

The Future of the Gig Economy

John Hagel

The “gig economy” has become an ever-expanding meme, clocking over 500,000 citations on Google. It’s also become an interesting barometer of sentiment. Some people, especially techies, love the concept and can’t wait until the gig economy frees everyone from working as employees for large, bureaucratic organizations. Others, especially “progressives,” worry that this is the latest form of labor exploitation that will surely consume all of us, driving us into the pits of poverty.

Trends 166

Revisiting the Ecosystem

Clark Quinn

One of the keys to the L&D revolution is recognizing the full performance ecosystem and the ways technology can support performance and development. I’ve tried to represent and share my thinking via diagrams (including here , here , and here ). Prompted by a recent conversation, it was time to revisit the representation. Here, I’m layering on several different ways to think about the goals, elements, etc.

Learning as Artifact Creation

George Siemens

Digitization is deceptive in that the deep impact isn’t readily observable. Remember when MOOCs were going to transform higher education? Or when personalized learning was going to do away with instructors? Going back about a century ago, audio, then video, was also going to disrupt education. All of these trends have been window dressing – a facade more reflective of the interests of those who advocate for them rather than a substantive departure from established norms.

Five emerging technologies for rapid digital transformation

Dion Hinchcliffe

The enterprise world of technology is finally catching up with the consumer world. Here are some representative examples of new enabling products for faster digital change

Top down implementation of social learning doesn’t work! (New article in the MWL Magazine)

Jane Hart

Now that social learning is a hot topic, many organizations are beginning to consider how they can implement or operationalize it. However, “social learning” is a very different type of learning from traditional training, because it is natural phenomenon (that takes place when people share and collaborate with one another) … Social learning

The CluePlane Manifesto

David Weinberger

( An unauthorized, unapproved homage to The Cluetrain Manifesto ). A powerful global reaccommodation has begun. Corporations are rediscovering themselves in their muscular masculinity. For we are the makers, the takers, and above all else, we are the winners. Customers, employees, the needy, the vulnerable are, by definition, the losers. Each one of them would gladly trade their seat for one of the tufted leather chairs in our CEO’s office.

Price 149

Sensemaking and the power of the humanities

Harold Jarche

What is Sensemaking? Christian Madsbjerg, in Sensemaking: The Power of the Humanities in the Age of the Algorithm , describes sensemaking as an interaction with fellow humans in the real world. Sensemaking is practical wisdom grounded in the humanities. We can think of sense making as as the exact opposite of algorithmic thinking: it is entirely situated in the concrete, while algorithmic thinking exists in a no-man’s land of information stripped of its specificity.

Design 207

Brands need to fire adtech

Doc Searls

Two days ago, the New York Times said AT&T and Johnson & Johnson are pulling their ads from YouTube. They’re concerned that “Google is not doing enough to prevent brands from appearing next to offensive material, like hate speech.” ” Yesterday, Business Insider said “more than 250” advertisers were bailing as well.

Scaling in complex systems

Dave Snowden

I wrote a series of posts about scaling over three year ago which in part addressed some of the perversities of methods focused on accreditation revenue to which I referred yesterday. They were important posts and sections will be dumped in Scrivener over the next months as I get ready for an intense booking writing week in a remote cottage on Ynys Môn this January.

Is Blockchain Ready to “Cross the Chasm”? Lessons from the Internet

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Earlier this year, IBM conducted the largest study to date on the state of adoption of blockchain. The study interviewed almost 3,000 C-Suite executives from over 80 countries and 20 industries to learn about their company’s blockchain plans. Survey responses where classified into three groups: explorers, investigators and passives. Explorers are already involved in blockchain pilots and experiments.

The Cognitive Era Is Cool But I’d Like To See The Human Era First

Dan Pontefract

You're reading fresh content from Dan Pontefract at Brave New Org: Several large-scale organizations have begun to align around a concept known as the “cognitive era.” ” Based on artificial intelligence and advanced cognitive systems, “cognitive era” Dan's Related Posts: The Platonic Leader: Stage 3 of 5 in the Leadership Tonic Scale. If There Is No Trust Or Joy At Work There Is A Low Chance For Purpose. Humans Should Aim To Be The Next Us.

Mastering the Learning Pyramid

John Hagel

Our media and conversations are consumed by concerns over the spread of AI and what it will mean for jobs. I’ve noticed that the discussion quickly turns to what skills we will need to continue to be employable in the future, especially when the participants have children who are trying to prepare themselves for the world ahead. The static world of skills. We’re focusing on the wrong thing. Focusing on skills betrays a static view of the world.

Skills 161

Revisiting 70:20:10

Clark Quinn

Last week, the Debunker Club (led by Will Thalheimer) held a twitter debate on 70:20:10 (the tweet stream can be downloaded if you’re curious). In ‘attendance’ were two of the major proponents of 70:20:10, Charles Jennings and Jos Arets. I joined Will as a moderator, but he did the heavy lifting of organizing the event and queueing up questions. And there were some insights from the conversations and my own reflections.

Tools 151

New Project: Digitizing Higher Education

George Siemens

In fall, I’ll be running a course on edX with a few colleagues on Digitizing Higher Education. This course is part of a larger initiative that I’ll be rolling out later this month focused on helping universities transition into digital systems: University Networks. Here’s the pitch: Higher education faces tremendous change pressure and the resulting structures that are now being formed will alter the role of universities in society for the next several generations.

The enterprise technologies to watch in 2017

Dion Hinchcliffe

It was a rebuilding year in a sense, as emerging tech for the enterprise steadily proceeded but didn't result in as many new targets to track as last year. Yet it's also abundantly clear the largest digital shifts by far are still ahead of us. Here's how 2017 is breaking down

A Modern Professional Learner’s Toolkit for 2018

Jane Hart

Based on the Top 100 Tools for Personal & Professional Learning 2017 list, here is the Modern Professional Learner’s Toolkit 2018. Social learning

List 206

[liveblog][PAIR] Rebecca Fiebrink on how machines can create new things

David Weinberger

At the PAIR symposium , Rebecca Fiebrink of Goldsmiths University of London asks how machines can create new things. NOTE: Live-blogging. Getting things wrong. Missing points. Omitting key information. Introducing artificial choppiness. Over-emphasizing small matters. Paraphrasing badly. Not running a spellpchecker. Mangling other people’s ideas and words. You are warned , people. She works with sensors.

soft skills are permanent skills

Harold Jarche

Are soft skills the new hard skills? I asked this question six years ago. I would suggest that hard skills are really temporary skills. They come and go according to the economy and the state of technology. Today, we need very few people who know how to shoe a horse. Soft skills are permanent ones. In a recent New York Times article the company LinkedIn had identified a number of currently in-demand skills. HARD SKILLS. Cloud Computing Expertise. Data Mining and Statistical Analysis.

Skills 205

How True Advertising Can Save Journalism From Drowning in a Sea of Content

Doc Searls

Journalism is in a world of hurt because it has been marginalized by a new business model that requires maximizing “content” instead. That model is calle d adtech. We can see adtech’s effects in The New York Times ’ In New Jersey, Only a Few Media Watchdogs Are Left , by David Chen.

connections not things

Dave Snowden

Following last weeks highly successful Cynefin Retreat we had a Cognitive Edge management meeting at my home in Wiltshire. In need of air I took people on the standard local walk around Avebury and introduced them to the Tolkein Tree (pictured left) which acts as a sentinel as the Stone Circle crosses the comparatively recent coach route between London and Bath; a Jane Austin crossed here moment.

AI and Public Policy

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Two years ago, Stanford University launched the One Hundred Year Study of AI (AI100), “to study and anticipate how the effects of artificial intelligence will ripple through every aspect of how people work, live and play.” One of its key missions is to convene a Study Panel of experts every five years to assess the then current state of the field, as well as to explore both the technical advances and societal challenges over the next 10 to 15 years. .

My Augusta Horribilis

Dan Pontefract

I received a Facebook message today from a friend. The first few lines read as follows: “Hi Dan, I’m not seeing much of the ‘real’ Dan's Related Posts: Please Don’t Let There Be Anonymity After Death Should Companies Allow Facebook at Work? I Detached on Holiday. I Didn’t Unplug. You Should Too. Why I’m Currently Only Writing About Gord and the Hip A Whole Lotta Learning And Love.

Never Under-Estimate the Immune System

John Hagel

Every large and successful institution has an immune system – a collection of individuals who are prepared to mobilize at the slightest sign of any “outside” ideas or people in order to ensure that these foreign bodies are neutralized and that the existing institution survives intact and can continue on course.

System 153

Deliberate Practice

Clark Quinn

A colleague pointed me to a intense critique of master’s programs in Instructional Design, and it raised several issues for me. So, I thought it’d be worth discussing. The issue is that the program didn’t provide any practice in designing courses from go to whoa, it was all about theory. In the comments, many people talk about how the programs they went did include projects, but this raises issues around the role of programs as well as what practice means.

Skills 148