Sat.Dec 15, 2018 - Fri.Dec 21, 2018

Culture 2 of 7: the canvass

Dave Snowden

I’m using the metaphor of a painting to provide structure to this series and all paintings have to start somewhere. One of the reasons for this is the sense of doing something with intent.

The Threat and Opportunity of Lifelong Learning

John Hagel

Our conversations and media are increasingly consumed by the topic of the “future of work.” And, within this topic, one of the buzzwords that has emerged and acquired increasing prominence is “lifelong learning.” The message is that, in a more rapidly changing world, we’re all going to have to abandon the traditional notion of going to school to learn and then going into a career to apply the learning we’ve received.

saving democracy

Harold Jarche

Why do younger people generally think it is less essential to live in a democracy? Perhaps it’s because the times are changing. The first democracies (USA, France, and gradually the UK) emerged about 300 years after the invention of the printing press.

Blockchain Beyond the Hype

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

A recent issue of The Economist included a special report on cryptocurrencies and blockchains.

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Culture 3 of 7: Identify the big shapes

Dave Snowden

While having specific goals is not possible in a complex system, and any cultural change is complex, it doesn’t mean that we can’t have a sense of direction and/or purpose. When a painter starts on their canvass they have a sense of what they are going to create.

Google vs. Bing

Doc Searls

In search , Google has a 90%+ share worldwide. But I’m not sure that makes it a monopoly, as long as it has real competition. With Bing is does. For example, recently I wanted to find a post Andrew Orlowski wrote for The Register in the early 00s. I remembered that it was about The Cluetrain Manifesto (which he called “Candide without the irony”—a great one-liner I can’t forget), and also mentioned John C. Dvorak , another Cluetrain non-fan.

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our echo-chambers can kill us

Harold Jarche

Cultural Echo-chambers. Innovation is about making connections — connecting people and connecting ideas. The broader and deeper the connections, the more potential for serendipity. This is why systemic factors like gender or racial bias put organizations and societies at a disadvantage.

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Culture 4 of 7: Light and Dark

Dave Snowden

Chiaroscuro is an art term, Italian in origin which refers to light and dark.

A meteor miss

Doc Searls

So yesterday evening, not long after sundown, we drove out to our usual spot in the countryside west of Santa Barbara to watch a big launch of a big rocket — NROL-71 — from Vandenberg Air Force Base. The launch had been scrubbed three times already, the last one only seven seconds from ignition.

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democracy and equality

Harold Jarche

Will technology empower or frustrate learning and will established powers control individuals or will something new emerge? These were the questions asked during the The Edinburgh Scenarios in 2004. The resulting scenarios were as follows.

MWL Newsletter No 95

Jane Hart

Articles and news about Modern Workplace Learning (MWL) for the week 9-15 Dec 2018 AI and the future of humans, L&D pain points, difference between training & coaching, Learning Experience systems, balancing autonomy and control, the role of Modern Learning Advisor, & more.

The case for PKM

Clark Quinn

Apparently, an acquaintance challenged my colleague Harold Jarche’s Personal Knowledge Mastery (PKM) model. He seemed to consider the possibility that it’s a fad. Well, I do argue people should be cautious about claims. So, I’ve talked about PKM before , but I want to elaborate.

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Book: Simple Acts to Change the World

Beth Kanter

Note from Beth: As we head into the holiday season and year-end giving, I invited Amy Neumann to share some thoughts about giving and her new book, “ Simple Acts to Change the World.” ” Guest Post: Giving the Gift of Giving by Amy Neumann.

Fun, Hard Fun, & Engagement

Clark Quinn

At Online Educa in Berlin, they apparently had a debate on fun in learning. The proposition was “all learning should be fun” And while the answer is obviously ‘no’, I think that it’s too simplistic of a question. So I want to dig a bit deeper into fun, engagement, and learning, how the right alignment is ‘hard fun’ Donald Clark weighs in with a summary of the debate and the point he thought was the winner.