Sat.Nov 07, 2020 - Fri.Nov 13, 2020

“… intire of it selfe”

Dave Snowden

A health warning – this is an exploratory post starting to develop an anthro-complexity theory of organisational change. As such I am working through some of the basic science relating to the constraints within which such a theory can be developed. This is Praxis in action!

Module 220

Flow, workflow, and learning

Clark Quinn

On LinkedIn, a colleague asked “ Why do people think that integrating content in the flow of work equals learning in the flow of work ?” ” An apt question. My (flip) response was “because marketing” And I think there’s a lot to that.

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What is the Zollman effect?

Harold Jarche

In a series of three posts, Jonathan Weisberg explains the Zollman effect. Here are some highlights. What is the Zollman effect? “More information generally means a better chance at discovering the truth, at least from an individual perspective.

Data 200

The Public Face of Science - Implications of the Covid Crisis

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

The Public Face of Science was launched four years ago by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences to better understand the complex relationship between scientists and the American public. The initiative has now published three reports. The first, Perceptions of Science in America , was published in 2018. It found that a majority of Americans have expressed a great deal of confidence in the scientific community, a confidence which has remained stable over the past thirty years.

Data 119

Transcend I: cadence and control

Dave Snowden

This is the first of two posts that deal with existing from a crisis, the final stage of Assess – Adapt – Exapt – Transcend. Part two tomorrow will handle the learning and ritualisation of the transition back to normal. Part one is about cadence and control.

Review 168

Reimaging Open Educational Resources

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

This is an edited transcript of my presentation 'Reimaging Open Educational Resources' presented November 10 2020 to the Open Education 2020 Conferemce. link] So what I want to talk to you today talked about with you today is open education resources.

permanent value

Harold Jarche

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. “No No honest poet can ever feel quite sure of the permanent value of what he has written. He may have wasted his time and messed up his life for nothing.” — T.S. Eliot.

More Trending

Keeping the faith?

Dave Snowden

Just as a warning, this is a rather rambling post. The overall theme is about constraints and is another theme I will be posting about over the next month or so. You might want to do a search on ‘Mending Walls’ both on this blog and the wider internet if you want more of the background.

12 Degrees of Freedom

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

I just read a post from Mitch Resnick on the seeds that Seymour Papert sowed, and highlighted for myself this most important statement: "Seymour rejected the computer-aided instruction approach in which 'the computer is being used to program the child' and argued for an alternative approach in which 'the child programs the computer.'"

We’re in the epilogue now

Doc Searls

The show is over. Biden won. Trump lost. Sure, there is more to be said, details to argue. But the main story—Biden vs. Trump, the 2020 Presidential Election, is over. So is the Trump presidency, now in the lame duck stage. We’re in the epilogue now. There are many stories within and behind the story, but this was the big one, and it had to end. Enough refs calling it made the ending official. President Trump will continue to fight, but the outcome won’t change.

News 150

How Sales and Service Teams Can Drive Customer Retention During a Crisis

TOPYX LMS

2020 has been a year of crisis that has brought great stress and uncertainty not just to individuals, but also to companies. McKinsey & Company stated, “Uncertainty can be measured in magnitude and duration.

Transcend II: Learning and ritual

Dave Snowden

I’ve never really been a player of games. I dabbled in chess when young and the family rituals on wet days on summer holidays involved Monopoly, Buccaneer, Sum-it, and the like. To be honest, I was more interested in reading, debating, sailing, or walking.

The need for order

Dave Snowden

When I was at school, way back in the days of the white-hot heat of technological optimism, the local printers made a gift to the school of their old platen press and a case of font trays. There were drawers for each font and point size all with a similar layout – a pattern that had emerged from the 15th Century based on the frequency of use. You would hold the composing stick (shown in the picture) in one hand and rapidly slot cold metal into it with the other.

Module 154

Lustful appetites

Dave Snowden

The title of this post is used collectively to refer to gluttony, fornication, and avarice in one of the sources for the formalisation of the Seven Deadline Sins by Pope Gregory I in the sixth century.

Naming things

Dave Snowden

Naming things is always fascinating and learning the origins of names an education of itself. Walking in the hills the etymology of the names of mountains, streams and other landscape features can tell you much about the people who lived there.