August, 2017

My Augusta Horribilis

Dan Pontefract

I received a Facebook message today from a friend. The first few lines read as follows: “Hi Dan, I’m not seeing much of the ‘real’ Dan's Related Posts: Please Don’t Let There Be Anonymity After Death Should Companies Allow Facebook at Work? I Detached on Holiday.

Liminal Cynefin, stepping over the threshold

Dave Snowden

I’ve been frantic the last few months with a lot of long standing wishes and dreams that are all coming together at the same time. The sort of thing that you initially say is the sort of problem you want to have, but when reality strikes one’s view is rather different.

How the personal data extraction industry ends

Doc Searls

Who Owns the Internet? What Big Tech’s Monopoly Powers Mean for our Culture is Elizabeth Kolbert ‘s review in The New Yorker of several books, one of which I’ve read: Jonathan Taplin ’s Move Fast and Break Things—How Facebook, Google, and Amazon Cornered Culture and Undermined Democracy.

What’s the Core Priority of Corporate Managers?

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

In a recent Harvard Business Review article, - The Error at the Heart of Corporate Leadership , - Harvard Business School professors Joseph Bower and Lynn Paine raised a number of important questions.

A comparison between organised and self-organised learning in the workplace

Jane Hart

What is the difference between L&D organised and managed learning AND self-organised and self-managed learning? In the graphic below I have compared some of the activities of both approaches to learning in the workplace. Although most interest still focuses on the top half of the graphic – ie providing services … Social learning

Measuring Your Real Net Worth

John Hagel

Net worth is an important topic, but not in the way it’s usually discussed. We all know about net worth – it’s about assets and liabilities, and hopefully the assets are bigger than the liabilities. But here’s the problem. Looking at net worth in financial terms focuses us on a lagging indicator. It tells us how we’ve done in the past, but it offers only limited insight into how we will do in the future. Is there a different way of thinking about net worth?

Learning in the Collaboration Age

Charles Jennings

(Repost and update from August 2014) Many may not have noticed it at the time, but the world of learning changed in 1990.

More Trending

Some new ways to look at infrastructure

Doc Searls

Nothing challenges our understanding of infrastructure better than a crisis, and we have a big one now in Houston. We do with every giant storm, of course. New York is still recovering from Sandy and New Orleans from Katrina.

Global Arbitrage and the Productivity Puzzle

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

A couple of weeks ago I wrote about The Productivity Puzzle , - namely that despite our continuing technology advances, the US and other developed economies have experienced a sharp decline in productivity growth over the past 10 to 15 years.

L E A D E R S H I P

Dan Pontefract

Some summer holiday thinking of mine. Leaders gain the respect of employees when they: 1) Listen with attentiveness. 2) Empathize without prejudice. 3) Act fairly, Dan's Related Posts: A Few Easy Steps For Entrepreneurs To Take To Enact A Higher Purpose In 5 Minutes Louis C.K.

Self-directed learning, Why email remains king, Help employees create knowledge, and more.

Jane Hart

MWL Newsletter No 27 News and articles about Modern Workplace Learning (MWL) selected by Jane Hart for the week 13-19 August 2017. Social learning

The enterprise technologies to watch in 2017

Dion Hinchcliffe

It was a rebuilding year in a sense, as emerging tech for the enterprise steadily proceeded but didn't result in as many new targets to track as last year. Yet it's also abundantly clear the largest digital shifts by far are still ahead of us. Here's how 2017 is breaking down

Liminal & situated strategy

Dave Snowden

I was originally going to move on to post about constraints but a early meeting this morning involved a stimulating discussion with the senior partner of a law firm and as a result I’ve going to carry on from yesterday’s post and return to constraints tomorrow.

The passive usefulness of public photography

Doc Searls

While I’m recovering more slowly than I’d like from some minor eye surgery, reading is too much of a chore; but searching for stuff isn’t.

Search 168

Automation Anxieties - We’ve Been Here Before

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

“The rise of artificial intelligence is the great story of our time,” notes What to Do When Machines Do Everything in its Preface.

System 172

Facebook And Apple CEOs Ask Us To Serve Humanity. Will We?

Dan Pontefract

During each spring, politicians, c-suite executives, movie stars, rock singers and authors are carted out in front of newly minted graduates to deliver “the commencement.

TWO articles of the week in this week’s MWL Newsletter

Jane Hart

News and articles about Modern Workplace Learning (MWL) selected by Jane Hart for the week 20-26 August 2017. Social learning

Cymbeline: Shakespeare’s worst play (Or: Lordy, I hope there’s a tape)

David Weinberger

The hosts of the BardCast podcast consider Cymbeline to probably be Shakespeare’s worst play. Not enough happens in the first two acts, the plot is kuh-razy, it’s a mishmash of styles and cultures, and it over-explains itself time and time again. That podcast is far from alone in thinking that it’s the Bard’s worst, although, as BardCast says, even the Bard’s worst is better than just about anything.

Yes but… (and the Isaiah moment is still with us)

Dave Snowden

Module 133

What happened to nonviolence?

Doc Searls

Two graphs tell some of the story.

Trends 130

Should Your Company Get on the Blockchain Learning Curve Now or Wait?

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

A few weeks ago I wrote about the current state of blockchain.

Evidence-based L&D

Clark Quinn

Earlier this year, I wrote that L&D was a ‘ Field of Dreams ‘ industry , running on a belief that “if you build it, it is good” There’s strong evidence that we’re not delivering on the needs of the organization.

Blog Post: Was James Damore acting in good faith and does it matter?

David Gurteen

By David Gurteen I am sure many of you are by now familiar with the Google memo controversy where a Google software engineer James Damore was fired for a memo that questioned Google's diversity policies. If you have not read the memo you will find it here. The memo has caused a heated online debate with people fiercely arguing in support of James Damore or against him.

Crafting Corporate Narratives: Zoom Out, Zoom In

John Hagel

I’ve been writing a lot about the significant missed opportunity to craft a compelling corporate narrative here and here. Done right, this corporate narrative can mobilize a large number of third parties to provide growing leverage, learning and loyalty for the company offering the narrative. While this is appealing to many executives, they stumble over the process of crafting a compelling narrative.

gRSShopper in a Box

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

My pre-conference workshop for Online Educa Berlin has been announced and this seems as good an occasion as any to summarize what I've been up to lately.

L&D needs a tuneup, Why training fails, ‘Digital transformation’ is a misnomer, and more …

Jane Hart

News and articles about Modern Workplace Learning (MWL) selected by Jane Hart for the week 6-12 August 2017. Social learning

News 118

Messy meaning

David Weinberger

Steve Thomas [twitter: @stevelibrarian] of the Circulating Ideas podcast interviews me about the messiness of meaning, library innovation, and educating against fake news. You can listen to it here. The post Messy meaning appeared first on Joho the Blog

3 E’s of Learning: why Engagement

Clark Quinn

When you’re creating learning experiences, you want to worry about the outcomes, but there’s more to it than that. I think there are 3 major components for learning as a practical matter, and I lump these under the E’s: Effectiveness, Efficiency, & Engagement.

Cost 173

Blog Post: The RSA has plans for a 21st century enlightenment coffeehouse

David Gurteen

By David Gurteen Given the metaphor that underpins my Knowledge Cafés I have long been interested in and written about the Enlightenment Coffeehouses of 17th and 18th Century London. Out of the coffeehouses came a number of institutions that exist to this day such as the London Stock Exchange, Lloyds of London. The auction houses Sotheby's and Christie's also have their origins in coffeehouses.

Collaboration Is Not Just A Technology. It’s A Behavior.

Dan Pontefract

The key for leaders to understanding collaboration is that it is not a technology. It is a behavior. But like a muscle, it is also. Dan's Related Posts: Flexible Working Works That Decision Is Above My Pay-Grade How to ‘Take One for the Team’ the FLAT ARMY cheat sheet The Social C-Suite. Behaviour collaboration flat army Connect consider

Help Hurricane Harvey Victims: Where To Donate #HoustonStrong

Beth Kanter

I watched the news reports from Texas and was horrified at the scale of this disaster. I grew up on the Jersey shore where I’ve been evacuated due to storms, but I have never seen this level of disaster. My heart goes out to the victims and I want to help.

Feed 112

Here’s more about the work of a Modern Learning Advisor

Jane Hart

In my previous article, I put the case for the new role of a Modern Learning Advisor and showed that in the modern workplace, L&D has two roles: To design, deliver and manage modern learning experiences for today’s busy people; and To enable and support individuals to organise and manage their own … Social learning

Design 116

Journalism, mistrust, transparency

David Weinberger

Ethan Zuckerman brilliantly frames the public’s distrust of institutional journal in a whitepaper he is writing for Knight. (He’s He’s posted it both on his blog and at Medium. Choose wisely.). As he said at an Aspen event where he led a discussion of it: …I think mistrust in civic institutions is much broader than mistrust in the press. Because mistrust is broad-based, press-centric solutions to mistrust are likely to fail.

friday’s urban finds

Harold Jarche

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. “Cars are like pharmaceuticals. There’s a legitimate place for them, but we resort to them too much.” ” —Peter D. Norton, via @grescoe.

Knowledge, Education, and the Role of Teachers

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

Responses to questions in advance of my presentation in Warsaw later this month. From your perspective, how do you see changes the modern society undergoes, especially in the field of education? I come from the interesting perspective of having been born and raised in a completely paper-based world and being able to watch it transform within a generation to an almost completely electronic world.

Automation Anxieties - We’ve Been Here Before

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

“The rise of artificial intelligence is the great story of our time,” notes What to Do When Machines Do Everything in its Preface. The book was published earlier this year by Malcolm Frank, Paul Roehrig and Ben Bring of Cognizant’s Center for the Future of Work. “Artificial intelligence has left the laboratory (and the movie lot)… It’s pervading all the institutions that drive our global economy.… And this is just the beginning.”.

Price 100

Measuring Your Real Net Worth

John Hagel

Net worth is an important topic, but not in the way it’s usually discussed. We all know about net worth – it’s about assets and liabilities, and hopefully the assets are bigger than the liabilities. But here’s the problem. Looking at net worth in financial terms focuses us on a lagging indicator. It tells us how we’ve done in the past, but it offers only limited insight into how we will do in the future. Is there a different way of thinking about net worth?