Diagramming

Clark Quinn

So yesterday I talked about the value of diagrams , but I thought I’d add a bit about the process of actually creating diagrams. Naturally, I created a diagram about it. I created this diagram for a session I ran on diagramming a number of years ago. In that session I talked about our cognitive architecture, why we need models, how diagrams work, properties and design issues, and more. It captures an ideal picture of how diagramming could work.

Diagramming Microlearning

Clark Quinn

And, as part of my usual wrestling with clarity, I created a diagram. The post Diagramming Microlearning appeared first on Learnlets. I’ll be giving an upcoming webinar where I make my case for defining microlearning. I thought I’d share it with you. What, you want me to walk you through it? Microlearning is a portmanteau (technical term: mashup) of micro and learning. Thus, it implies small bits of learning. Here I’m mapping it out in several ways.

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Example Diagram

Clark Quinn

No, not a diagram that’s an example, a diagram about examples! I created this because I needed a diagram to represent examples. I’ve written about them, and I have diagrams for other components of learning like models. The post Example Diagram appeared first on Learnlets. However, I wanted to capture some important points about examples. So here we go. The idea here is that an example should be a story, with narrative flow.

Diagram!

Clark Quinn

One of the things that I feel is a really useful tool in my ongoing learning, in my ‘making sense of the world’ is diagramming. I find diagrams to be a really powerful way to understand not just elements, but relationships. And yet it doesn’t feel like diagramming gets enough respect. So I want to make a case for the diagram. My PhD advisor kindly pointed out that actually parsing this was hard, and recommended a diagram instead.

Corporate Culture in a Venn Diagram

Dan Pontefract

There is a diagram floating around LinkedIn and Twitter that attempts to illustrate an individual’s true ‘purpose’ It’s amusing to me, because it’s short-sighted. There are four circles in the Venn Diagram, where the overlapping circles read as follows: Passion/Profession – That which you are good at.

Network Diagrams

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

For #cck11 here is a selection of network diagrams: Web of Data From Linked Data Meetup Last.fm Related Musical Acts From Sixdegrees.hu Map of Science From Plos One , Clickstream Data Yields High-Resolution Maps of Science

PLE Diagram

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

Another attempt - this time using Gliffy - to illustrate my own thinking about what a PLE should entail. I created a demo of a part of this concept ages ago, here - it is never listed as among the "examples of PLEs" but is in fact a first draft of what I think a PLE should look like (I promise to lose the yellow, though). It doesn't really work in Internet Explorer, but it works just fine in Firefox

Animation thoughts

Clark Quinn

Instead, here I’m talking about animated diagrams. Diagrams map conceptual relationships to spatial ones, and can add additional coding with color and shape. Interestingly, in the conversation, it came up what one form of her animations were diagram builds.

Practicing the Preach

Clark Quinn

I usually use Omnigraffle as a diagramming tool, to represent my conceptual understandings. But I started with a diagram, and took the elements out and mindmapped them, and threw in other bits. I’m working on my next plan for global domination.

Communication Nation: Visio Conference 2008

Dave Gray

I drew this card when Jeff Raikes was describing how Steve Ballmer recruited him from Apple by scribbling diagrams about their future vision in a restaurant. Communication Nation Communication is one of the most important skills anyone can have, in business and in life. As individuals and as a species, I believe we will be happier and more productive if we can improve our ability to communicate. This blog is dedicated to that effort. Join the conversation!

The 6 Ps of Modern Workplace Learning

Jane Hart

I have shared, in a number of places, a diagram of Modern Workplace Learning (MWL) , which I believes visualise all the main ways we learn at work. However, I have recently added a few P words that have helped to (a) summarise the different elements as well as (b) L&D’s role in it, so I am sharing this diagram […].

Modelling

Clark Quinn

I had to submit my deck for my DevLearn workshop on Cognitive Science for Learning Design last week, but oddly, for every thing I was recommending I had a diagram, except for the notion of using models. This is ironic, since diagrams can be used to convey models. And then I remembered that I gave a presentation years ago specifically on diagrams. Moreover, in that presentation I had a diagram for a process for creating a diagram (Department of Redundancy Department).

Learnlets » Performance Ecosystem Collaboration

Clark Quinn

Informal Learning Blog » The human performance landscape

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

Informal Learning Blog » The human performance landscape

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

Levels of LXD Design

Clark Quinn

I stumbled across the Elements of UX diagram again, and happened to wonder if it would map to LXD. To start with, JJG’s diagram works from the bottom up. This will be the videos, audios, text, diagrams, images, and more that comprise the experience.

Design 155

Learnlets » Visualizing the role of visuals

Clark Quinn

Learnlets » New blogger

Clark Quinn

Learnlets » New blogger

Clark Quinn

5 Stages of Workplace Learning (Revisited in 2017)

Jane Hart

In May 2010 I posted a diagram I had created that showed what I considered to be the 5 stages of … Social learningNew article in the Modern Workplace Learning Magazine “In this article I take a look at how workplace learning has changed over the last 10+ years and its necessary future direction.

Learnlets » Models, manuals, and more…

Clark Quinn

Networks and Complexity (1)

Dave Snowden

First we look at the traditional hierarchy – the tree diagram in Figure 8. The same connections are present whether we layout the graph as a tree (Figure 8) or as a hub and spoke diagram (Figure 10). The above diagram might reveal this is what the client intended.

The next step for L&D in the modern workplace

Jane Hart

In my recent postings on Modern Workplace Learning, I shared the diagram (below) that showed the wide range of learning experiences that take place in the workplace. In fact it is now recognised that the term “workplace learning” is no longer synonymous with “training” but also implies a continuous process that lies at the heart of […]. Social learning

5 Stages of Workplace Learning (Revisited Again)

Jane Hart

In May 2010 I posted a diagram I had created that showed what I considered to be the 5 stages of Workplace Learning. In this post I take a look at how workplace learning has been changing over the last 5 years. My Internet Time Alliance (ITA) colleague, Jay Cross, re-worked it so that I looked […]. Social learning

Top 10 Tools for Learning 2020

Clark Quinn

Besides writing, two ways I sort out my understandings are to diagram and to outline. I use OmniGraffle as a general purpose diagramming tool because, well, it largely works the way I want to think about it. Diagrams, mind maps, even recently as sort of posterboard.

Tools 196

Everything Is Urgent! Everything Is Urgent! Everything Is Urgent!

Dan Pontefract

Corporate Culture in a Venn Diagram. You're reading fresh content from Dan Pontefract at Brave New Org: It’s the middle of a client meeting. There are six of us. We are discussing the rather dismal results of a team’s level of engagement. Dan's Related Posts: Maybe We Should Be More Like a Fridge at Work. Sadly, The Importance Of Importance Is Now What’s Most Important. Is Your Corporate Culture The Root Cause Of Bad Meetings?

Harold Jarche » Bridging with Conversations

Harold Jarche

The Five Rules Of Managing Up

Dan Pontefract

Dan's Related Posts: Corporate Culture in a Venn Diagram. You're reading fresh content from Dan Pontefract at Brave New Org: Most of us have a boss. Some of us actually like them. The “boss” is that person who is ultimately responsible for your status in. The Cognitive Era Is Cool But I’d Like To See The Human Era First. Maybe We Should Be More Like a Fridge at Work. Everything Is Urgent! Everything Is Urgent! Everything Is Urgent! Don’t Be An Elitist Jerk When Saying No.

The Easiest Ways To Create Disengaged Employees

Dan Pontefract

Dan's Related Posts: Corporate Culture in a Venn Diagram. You're reading fresh content from Dan Pontefract at Brave New Org: In my line of work, on a fairly regular basis, I get to meet disengaged employees. The factors for their disengagement are often varied, never. This IBM Employee Quit Her Job. I Commend Her For Doing So. Sheri Quit Her Job And Regained Her Purpose Sweet Spot. The Cognitive Era Is Cool But I’d Like To See The Human Era First.

A Proven Way To Be A Better Sales Account Executive

Dan Pontefract

Corporate Culture in a Venn Diagram. You're reading fresh content from Dan Pontefract at Brave New Org: If you are an account executive on the sales team of your organization, no doubt you live and die by a few key factors. There. Dan's Related Posts: Selling Yourself & Your Ideas is the New 20 Percent Time. An Engaged Culture Improves Performance, Not The Other Way Around. The Lost Trust Of Millennials With Big Business.

My daily PKM routine (practices and toolset)

Jane Hart

He has developed a popular Seek-Sense-Share framework which identifies the 3 key elements of PKM (see diagram on the right) [.]. Harold Jarche is a leading authority on Personal Knowledge Management, which he describes as a set of processes, individually constructed, to help each of us make sense of our world, and work more effectively. Social learning

PKM 214

How Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups Explains Culture, Purpose & Employee Engagement

Dan Pontefract

Corporate Culture in a Venn Diagram. You're reading fresh content from Dan Pontefract at Brave New Org: I have several favorite chocolate bars. Crunchie is one. Toffee and chocolate. What a combination. So too is a Reese Cup. Peanut butter and chocolate? Dan's Related Posts: Q&A on the Future of Social, Mobile and eLearning. A Few Easy Steps For Entrepreneurs To Take To Enact A Higher Purpose. Evolution of the Chief Learning Officer. Three Tough Questions Answered About Purpose.

The difference between social learning and social collaboration

Jane Hart

In my framework of Modern Workplace Learning (see diagram on right) I use the term social collaboration to label an important new element of work of the modern-day L&D department. I deliberately chose not to label it social learning. So what is the difference – or rather connection – between these two terms? Social learning, is of course, not a […]. Social learning

Harold Jarche » Analysis for Informal Learning

Harold Jarche

Book hiccups

Clark Quinn

The correspondent pointed to a particular diagram, and asked what I meant. It turns out, in editing (they’d outsourced it, I understand), someone had reversed the meaning of a caption for a diagram!

Harold Jarche » SmartDraw 2007

Harold Jarche

Top 10 Learning Tools for 2019

Clark Quinn

OmniGraffle: a lot of thinking comes from reflection, both with the blog for thoughts, and through diagramming my understanding. Diagrams allow us to map conceptual relationships to spatial ones to facilitate comprehension. It’s time again for Jane Hart’s Top Learning Tools Survey , so it’s time for my personal list (and for you to submit yours). Here goes! WordPress: my first learning tool is this blog. Here’s where I lay out my ideas.

Tools 176

Cognition external

Clark Quinn

And I’ll talk it out first here, and maybe a diagram will emerge. I shared Jane Hart’s diagram yesterday, and I know that it’s a revision of a prior one. The diagram is capturing her framework, and such externalizations are a way to share; they’re a social as well as artifactual sharing. I was thinking a bit about distributed cognition, and recognized that there as a potentially important way to tease that apart.

The Graphic That Started My Journey Researching Purpose Three Years Ago

Dan Pontefract

I was going through my iPad sketches recently (on the Bamboo Paper app , where I am constantly scribbling things down like diagrams, charts, etc.) and I came across this Venn diagram. Dan's Related Posts: Flat Army on the Back of a (Digital) Napkin Corporate Culture in a Venn Diagram Why I Wrote “The Purpose Effect” Book Lo-Tech Talk #2: The Leaders Guide to The Purpose Effect Free Download of Chapter 1 – The Purpose Effect .

3 – L&D roles to support learning at work

Jane Hart

In this third post I want to consider the L&D roles for enabling this, so in the diagram below I’ve plotted them onto the diagram I have been using in the last two posts. From this diagram, three broad roles become apparent to support the multitude of activities that were described in my second post.

A very insightful framework

Clark Quinn

And I’m not sure there’s what I call ‘slow’ innovation there, creating a culture and practices about experimentation and exposure to the ‘adjacent possible’ But it’s hard for one diagram to capture everything, and this does a great job. But as an advocate of diagrams and frameworks, I think this is truly insightful and useful. Jane Hart has just come up with something new and, to me, intriguing.

Useful cognitive overhead

Clark Quinn

As background, I diagram. A famous cognitive science article talked about how diagrams are representations that map conceptual relationships to spatial ones, to use the power of our visual system to facilitate comprehension. Now, what I realized (as I was diagramming) is that the way I diagram actually leverages cognitive overhead in a productive way. I can use a whiteboard, but usually to communicate a diagram already conceived.

Interesting times

Clark Quinn

And there’s actually a good reason for this… This is a really wonderful diagram (ok, my poor rendition of it). This diagram, and the associated label “flattening the curve” really conveys the need for action.