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UX Week 2014 Keynote Josh Clark on the Future of Digital Product Design

Adaptive Path

Josh is the author of the book Tapworthy: Designing Great iPhone Apps, and frequently gives workshops and talks at conferences around the world. In this interview, Josh and I talk about the current trends in digital product design, and where those trends might be heading. Then touch suddenly brought in the centuries-old influence of industrial design. JJG: Like you, I have always seen design through the lens of storytelling.

Toward a Pattern Language for Enterprise 2.0 : Andrew McAfee’s Blog

Andy McAfee

Andrew McAfee’s Blog The Business Impact of IT Home Home RSS Search Toward a Pattern Language for Enterprise 2.0 June 10 2009 Comments to this post A Pattern Language , published in 1979 by Christopher Alexander and his colleagues, was a landmark book in architecture that also became a landmark in other fields like computer science ; one review called it “The decade’s best candidate for a permanently important book.&# First is a set of patterns where 2.0

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[liveblog] Judith Donath on designing for sociality (“Social Machines”)

David Weinberger

I read it this weekend and it is a rich work that explores the ways in which good design can improve our online sociality. Judith begins by saying that the theme of the book is the importance of online social interaction and designing for it. She uses a Mark Twain story [" Was the World Made for Man? "] about an oyster’s point of view to remind us that online design isn’t really all that evolved. She came back from Japan trying to design a more useful display.

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Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: Retailers and Customers

John Hagel

Almost a decade ago, I detected an intriguing pattern regarding the unbundling and rebundling of firms (purchase unfortunately required). The first wave of outsourcing can be understood as the systematic carving out of the infrastructure management businesses from companies, but we’re just on the cusp of a second wave that will unbundle product innovation and commercialization businesses from customer relationship businesses.

Experimentation: chocolate cakes and communicators | Full Circle Associates

Nancy White

What gets us moving beyond our customary habits and patterns? And what a wonderful and productive, chocolately surprise that can be. Viv McWaters on 29 Sep 2008 at 8:48 pm Hi Nancy Synchronicity does it for me every time – wakes me up when I start seeing a pattern. And what a wonderful and productive, chocolately surprise that can be.’

The Social Network Is the Computer

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

This ecosystem has been designed to stimulate and manipulate the human psyche, “to draw us in and persuade us to change how we shop, vote, and exercise, and even who we love.”

Three Mobile User Experience Trends to Watch in 2009

Adaptive Path

Design decisions were largely based on product design; user interface was an afterthought. Whether the cleverness of parallax sliding on of the Android G1 UI, the whimsical transitions of the HTC Diamond, or the “gosh that’s cool” response to applications like Koi Pond and Urban Spoon , these interfaces introduced UI design that was clever, creative and intuitive. 2009 will be the year inspired mobile UI design goes mainstream.

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Machine Learning and Knowledge Discovery

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

This is evidenced by the number of companies embracing AI as a key part of their strategies, the innovative, smart products and services they’re increasingly bringing to market, and the volume of articles being written on the subject. As new data is ingested, the system rewires itself based on whatever new patterns it now finds. To automate the process, the host can then use machine learning to discover common patterns or features among all the guests.

Social Physics - Reinventing Analytics to Better Predict Human Behaviors

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

T hey eventually discovered that all event-data representing human activity contain a special set of social activity patterns regardless of what the data is about. These patterns are common across all human activities and demographics, and can be used to detect emerging behavioral trends before they can be observed by any other technique. . who is likely to try this newly-launched product?;

Experimentation: chocolate cakes and communicators | Full Circle Associates

Nancy White

What gets us moving beyond our customary habits and patterns? And what a wonderful and productive, chocolately surprise that can be. Viv McWaters on 29 Sep 2008 at 8:48 pm Hi Nancy Synchronicity does it for me every time – wakes me up when I start seeing a pattern. And what a wonderful and productive, chocolately surprise that can be.’

Wiki 100

Where is Technology Taking the Economy

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

From mainframe and supercomputers to PCs and workstation, IT was now being used in a wide variety of applications, from financial services and oil exploration, to computer-aided design and office systems. “The economy for the first time had serious computational assistance.”. Productivity (GDP per worker) falls too.”. I recently read Where is Technology Taking the Economy? , an article in McKinsey Quarterly by W.

AI - the Creation of a Human-Centric Engineering Discipline

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Machine and deep learning are the latest examples of tools like the World Wide Web, search and analytics that are helping us cope with and take advantage of the huge amounts of information all around us. But, over time, engineering advances have led to foundational scientific principles, development practices and building blocks that significantly increased their safety and productivity. AI is rapidly becoming one of the most important technologies of our era.

Single Question Interview: David Merrill of Tacolab on Siftables

Adaptive Path

The graphical user interface (GUI) was a similar (but even larger) revolution in usability that expanded the expressivity of our interaction with the machine, and we are vastly more productive as a result. The motivation for Siftables was a realization that there was no human-computer interface that simultaneously leveraged our visual search/pattern-matching capabilities and our manual dexterity for handling collections of objects.

Social Media Planning and Evaluation for NGOs | Full Circle Associates

Nancy White

This topic is designed to give you some tools and ideas for including social media appropriately in your overall organizational strategic plan and to measure its effectiveness. Do a search to see who has linked to that post? (Do Do you know how to do this on Google, Yahoo or Microsoft search? On the other hand, if you believe in the emergence of new patterns, complexity and the need to adapt to circumstances, then you are likely to embrace social media for development.

Supporting our Brains

Clark Quinn

One of the ways I’ve been thinking about the role mobile can play in design is thinking about how our brains work, and don’t. To begin with, our cognitive architecture is demonstrably awesome; just look at your surroundings and recognize your clothing, housing, technology, and more are the product of human ingenuity. Technology, for instance, is bad at pattern-matching and meaning-making, two things we’re really pretty good at.

The Glass Box And The Commonplace Book

Steven Berlin Johnson

there is any number that directs me to the page designed for words that begin with an E and whose first vowel after the initial letter is I, I must then write under the word Epistola in that page what I have to remark. Locke’s approach seems almost comical in its intricacy, but it was a response to a specific set of design constraints: creating a functional index in only two pages that could be expanded as the commonplace book accumulated more quotes and observations.

Workshop on Mass Collaboration - Day One

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

Can we design mass collaboration? Marshall''s theory of hot spots: these areas exist for three reasons: - pooled resources - workers and firms are drawn to these places - specialized products and services - for example, hairdressers and agents in Hollywood - ''ideas in the air'' - information and skills flow easily between people Brown and Duguid on Silicon Valley - ''The Social Life of Information'' - there are these ''networks of practice'' across firms, eg.

Educational Research in Learning Technology

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

I think the key point here is to note that not everything is designed to increase test scores. A wider search may reveal more such articles. Also aka 'design research', where proving something works is all that it takes) - what's wanted? After a period of time, a tool (like a word processor or LMS) is no longer novel to the teacher or the school, and so they settle into a 'more normal' pattern of usage for that tool. This is a common pattern for systematic reviews.

Where is Technology Taking the Economy

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

From mainframe and supercomputers to PCs and workstation, IT was now being used in a wide variety of applications, from financial services and oil exploration, to computer-aided design and office systems. “The economy for the first time had serious computational assistance.”. Productivity (GDP per worker) falls too.”. I recently read Where is Technology Taking the Economy? , an article in McKinsey Quarterly by W.

Why is it so Difficult to Make Long-Term Predictions?

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Much effort will be put into the designing of vehicles with Robot-brains vehicles that can be set for particular destinations and that will then proceed there without interference by the slow reflexes of a human driver.” . Again, kitchens, appliances, cars and airplanes are improving relatively slowly since they are all products of previous waves. Once they reached a good-enough stage, leading edge innovators and investors moved on to search for the next big thing.

Issues 200

The IT-based Transformation of Services

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

In a series of talks and panel discussions , the workshop first reviewed the historical patterns of technology innovations and economic cycles, and then looked at the future of work economics in three key areas: technologies and societal infrastructure; skills and jobs; and careers and quality-of-life measures. We have generally viewed services in contrast to what they are not: products, manufacturing or the industrial sector of the economy, rather than what they are.

Big Data Takes Center Stage

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

The key question is whether the technology will keep falling through the trough and be soon forgotten, or whether it will eventually move on toward the slope of enlightenment on its way to a long life in the plateau of productivity. In 2000, only one-quarter of the world’s stored information was digital and therefore subject to search and analysis. Sampling requires anticipating how the data will be used so you can design the proper sample.

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Why Do Firms Exist?

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

He explained that, in principle, a firm should be able to find the cheapest, most productive goods and services by contracting them out in an efficient, open marketplace. Transaction costs are incurred in obtaining goods and services outside the firm, such as searching for the right people, negotiating a contract, coordinating the work, managing intellectual property and so on. Processes are put in place as people learn how to improve the productivity and quality of their work.

e-Clippings (Learning As Art): Virtual Currency for Your Email

Mark Oehlert

e-Clippings (Learning As Art) Home Archives Subscribe About My Social Networks « Zepheira and Semantic Web Resources | Main | Shout out to my current favorite Web-based tool: Pixer » July 03, 2007 Virtual Currency for Your Email Seriosity, the same company that just published the Leadership in Games and Work with IBM, also has an interesting product called Attent.

New Tools Beget Revolutions: Big Data and the 21st Century Information-based Society

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Thus was microbiology born, leading to major discoveries in biology, medicine, public health and food production in subsequent decades and centuries. Big data is such a measurement revolution made possible by the new digital tools all around us, including location data transmitted by our mobile phones; searches, web links and social media interactions; payments and transactions; the myriads of smart sensors keeping track of the physical world; and so on.

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Hypercard 25th Anniversary Celebration

Jay Cross

Twenty-five years ago Apple released a visionary product, Hypercard. Bill Atkinson designed the app to free people to create their own programs without the rigors of programming. Raines Cohen , co-founder of BMUG (Berkeley Mac User Group), once the largest user group in the world, drew out Bill Atkinson with initial questions and then wowed the audience by searching and displaying sites and photos on the web in real time as Bill and the audience brought them up.

[misc][liveblog] Alex Wright: The secret history of hypertext

David Weinberger

He’s currently at Etsy , which is a fascinating and inspiring place to work, and is a professor interaction design, He continues to think about the possibilities for design and organization that led him to write about Paul Otlet who created what Alex has called an “analog search engine”: a catalog of facts expressed in millions of index cards. This, along with economic and social changes, enabled the mass production of books, newspapers, and magazines.

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: The Power of Power Laws

John Hagel

At one level it is much simpler – there is a meaningful “average consumer” that can be used to scale products and operations around – and it is a much more predictable world. In many respects, the history of Western business in the twentieth century represents an effort to build scalable operations through standardization designed to serve “average consumers”. Searching for simplicity Besides extreme events, there’s another implication of the shift to a Paretian world.

Dean Krafft on the Linked Data for Libraries project

David Weinberger

Cornell: Dean Krafft, Jon Corso-Rickert, Brian Lowe, Simeon Warner Stanford: Tom Cramer, Lynn McRae, Naomi Dushay, Philip Schreur Harvard: Paul Deschner, Paolo Ciccarese, me Aim: Create a Scholarly Resource Semantic Info Store model that works within and across institutions to create a network of Linked Open Data to capture the intellectual value that librarians and other domain experts add to info, patterns of usage, and more. It provides search results enhanced by what it knows.

mastery and models

Harold Jarche

It provides the systems of record that can be searched and queried so that mistakes and exceptions are not repeated. Personal knowledge mastery is the ability to see patterns hidden to the undisciplined eye. The perpetual beta working model consists of three overlapping network types: Connectivity, Alignment, and Productivity. Productivity networks can develop the skills necessary to support the other network types. They were all designed for a different era.

PKM 142

Beyond Institutions Personal Learning in a Networked World

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

Thinking in Models: for Design, for Learning… A large part of this talk is about that change. When you look at that, basically it''s like they have this model or design in their head of how we could rebuild the university system, wipe it all out, start over, and we''ll have a new model. Models of how to do learning, learning design patterns: Grainne Conole has done a lot on this. In these models, these designs are being implemented as educational technology.

Reflections on the Nature of Human Organizations

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

They also discovered that the socioeconomic or human patterns of a city followed a similar power law, but this time it was superlinear with an exponent of 1.15. He explained that, in principle, a firm should be able to find the cheapest, most productive goods and services by contracting them out in an efficient, open marketplace. Urbanization is one of the major forces transforming societies all over the world.

How Social Movements Happen, Part II: Hollowing Out, Self.

Seb Paquet

are there patterns there? You need some powerful tools of production to get up to some mischief. So the people at the bottom are doing the productive work that sustains the organization while the people at the top are building the barriers to entry(?). I have been searching for a term to describe the disintigration of this system. I was brought in as someone who could do a wide variety of tasks and recognized by the company for my productivity.

Class 72

Passion and Reason

John Hagel

It helps us to choose the most productive directions to pursue as we venture into the domain and helps us to solve the difficult puzzles that we encounter.   It helps us to reflect on our experiences and to begin to discern patterns emerging from seemingly unique encounters. Productive friction. I have written about productive friction elsewhere.    Passion provides a firm foundation for productive friction to emerge and flourish.

Class 159

How To Avoid Becoming Addicted To Your Mobile Phone

Beth Kanter

Recently, 60 Minutes did a piece on Brain Hacking or intentionally designing apps so you feel the need to to check in constantly. They also interviewed a former Google product manager, Tristan Harris , about how tech companies are intentionally creating a large scale epidemic of behavioral addiction to our mobile phones and apps. The presentation inspired with Ted Talk and then a popular Medium post that discusses how interface design influences people’s behaviors.

Artificial Intelligence for Good: A Few Good Articles To Read #AI4Good

Beth Kanter

” He is reminding of us of shiny object syndrome and to be skeptical of technology in search of solutions. The author, Eirini Maliaraki, an interaction designer, argues for more precise definition of the emerging field “AI for Good,” with a focus on outcomes, not the technology. 4) Story Mapping Personal Stories: Nonprofits have the potential to use AI to analyze personal stories of key stakeholders to better design pathways to using those programs.

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: Community 2.0

John Hagel

As a result, much of this investment was wasted, consistent with the broader pattern of the dot com bubble. marketing vs. customer support vs. product development)? The key question for community participants is: Of the total attention I allocate to this particular source, what is the productivity of that attention in terms of value received for effort and time invested? It exhibits specific network patterns.

ROI 168

A Trip to the Bookstore

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

In particular, I wanted to study the chapter on ''the pattern recognition theory of mind,'' which readers will know is an approach I have also advocated over the years. This is a long-term problem that I don''t know how I am going to address, because it means that products from Microsoft - software, audio, video, books - are unreliable, and may disappear at any moment, without recourse or compensation.

eBook 153

Bring on The Live Web

Doc Searls

For example, we could search in real time, but search engine indexes were essentially archives, no matter how often they were updated. Technorati , IceRocket , PubSub and other live RSS-fed search engines came along to address that issue, as did Google Blogsearch as well. It has “sites” with “addresses” and “locations” in “domains” we “develop” with the help of “architects”, “designers” and “builders”. Search not only needs to be up-to-date, but up-to-now.

e-Clippings (Learning As Art): Reflections from Adaptive Paths UX Week 2007

Mark Oehlert

e-Clippings (Learning As Art) Home Archives Subscribe About My Social Networks « A foot in both worlds.working on a MacBook | Main | Facebook on iPhone (Inside Facebook) » August 25, 2007 Reflections from Adaptive Paths UX Week 2007 I had a little time now to digest all that I heard at the user experience/design conference named UX Week 2007 and put on by Adaptive Path. The presentation by Lisa Stausfeld and her team was a tremendous demonstration of the power of design.

TTI Vanguard Conference Notes - 1

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

people building their own cyberspaces - the power of weak ties - especially for search, intelligence, viral marketing - the emergence of patterns and structure - the power of strong ties - eg. At the societal level, we are able to find the patterns of what are salient across large numbers of people. The way people come together online in different societies reflects the kinds of things those societies are interested in - different language groups exhibit different patterns.

The 2016 Look at the Future of Online Learning

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

Seven Key Technology Patterns 1. The only people who really need predictive analytics are advertisers (their task will be to advise companies to create products people want, rather than to influence people to want the products they create). Five Key Features of Online Learning Which Technology Patterns Will Enable 1. Sure, learning and working with other people can be fun and productive.

Beyond Assessment ? Recognizing Achievement in a Networked World

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

It''s the basis for instructional design. You start with what you want them to learn, design an experience, cause them to learn it, build in some checks, and see that this has all happened in the end. We have reports saying the time in school spent by a country''s children is directly related to the productivity of its workers. I''d probably say it differently because I''m not so concerned about the productivity of its workers. You look and you search and you search.