Apparently, Organizational Culture is Crap

Dan Pontefract

The one thing we can be assured of until humans safely land and colonize Mars is “ organizational culture ” will continue to be a topic of conversation. ” That sounds like a pretty good starting point of organizational culture to me. yes, through its culture).

Cultural Alignment

Clark Quinn

I was thinking about the ways in which organizations can support performance. However, I also realized that there was an opportunity to extend that to cultural alignment, and I think that’s important as well. The post Cultural Alignment appeared first on Learnlets.

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Why Organizations Don’t Learn

Jay Cross

Where organic, bottom-up meets corporate top-down. An article entitled Why Organizations Don’t Learn by Francesca Gino and Bradley Staats in the November 2015 issue of Harvard Business Review caught my eye.

organizing for the network era

Harold Jarche

In my last post I noted that many organizations today are nothing more than attractive prisons. These organizations are artifacts of a time when information was scarce and hard to share, and when connections with others were difficult to make and required command and control.

Culture or Cultures?

Clark Quinn

A twitter pointer led me to an HBR article arguing that We’re Thinking about Organizational Culture all Wrong. In it, the author argues that it’s fallacious to think that there’s just one organizational culture, , and that all people buy into it. The first is that the cultural values may be interpreted differently. The second is that people may comply with the culture even if they don’t agree with it. Cultures are developed and do change.

The Connected Culture

Dan Pontefract

Chaordic is any self–organizing, adaptive, non-linear, complex system, whether physical, biological, or social, the behaviour of which exhibits characteristics of both order and chaos or, loosely translated to business terminology, cooperation and competition.

Corporate culture

Harold Jarche

Tweet Next month I’ll be discussing corporate culture at Sibos in Toronto. My view (not original) is that corporate culture is an emergent property. It is a result of the myriad properties of the organization and its environment. To know the culture, be the culture.

Is Your Corporate Culture The Root Cause Of Bad Meetings?

Dan Pontefract

Worse, however, is the fact meetings are very unproductive costing organizations an incredible $37 billion annually due to various factors. The organizers could never land on one common date, so two more meetings were created to accommodate their schedules. Culture meetings

The Rise of the T-Shaped Organization

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

The concept of T-shaped skills was first introduced over 20 years ago, but its importance, - to both individuals and organizations, - has continued to rise. The growing demand for T-shaped skills points to the rise of the T-shaped organization.

There Is Nothing Wrong With The Term ‘Company Culture’

Dan Pontefract

The headline from Harvard Business Review read, Why “Company Culture” Is a Misleading Term. “Organizational culture is assumed to be important to making sure that employees are happy and productivity is good. ” Is there no “company culture” present in Japan?

Building a Culture of Continuous Learning

Charles Jennings

To achieve these three targets, we need to think out of the traditional learning and development box – beyond the class/course and eLearning module approaches towards embedding a culture where learning becomes recognised as occurring within the workflow. Most people get it.

The Connected Culture

Dan Pontefract

Chaordic is any self–organizing, adaptive, non-linear, complex system, whether physical, biological, or social, the behaviour of which exhibits characteristics of both order and chaos or, loosely translated to business terminology, cooperation and competition.

Corporate Culture in a Venn Diagram

Dan Pontefract

The diagram suggests your purpose (arguably something that is aided and abetted by whether or not an employee is engaged at work) isn’t affected by other factors such as your direct manager, your team, or the organization where you work. In other words, a culture killer.

Culture Before Strategy

Clark Quinn

In an insightful article, Ken Majer (full disclosure, a boss of mine many years ago) has written about the need to have the right culture before executing strategy. I have argued that you can get some benefits from the Revolution without having an optimized culture, but you’re not going to tap into the full potential. What Ken is talking about here is ensuring you have values and culture in alignment with the vision and mission.

Creating More Intelligent Organizations

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

organize these collaborations and enhance them with innovative IT-based. If so, is it possible to create more intelligent organizations? Another CCI project is aiming to answer these questions by trying to understand the intrinsic nature of intelligent organizations.

Who "owns" your organization's culture?

Mark Oehlert

Yep, culture. Often it''s like a specter hanging over failed projects - "the culture wasn''t prepared to accept that technology." We talk about it''s importance and about having the right one and about disruptive ones and innovation ones but I think we need to be a bit more basic up front. . The first thing you need to understand about organizational culture is that you already have one. Want a culture that makes people at all levels feel that they have input?

Does Your Nonprofit Organization’s Culture Eat French Fries for Breakfast?

Beth Kanter

Self-care in a nonprofit organization is the responsibility of both the individual staff person and the organization. Organizations must support staffs’ self-care efforts through clearly articulate values, policies, and programs. Flickr Photo by Kris Krug.

If Your Enterprise Social Network Is a Ghost Town It’s Probably Due To Your Corporate Culture

Dan Pontefract

One I know thousands of other companies and organizations are struggling with at this very moment. Tell me, would you describe your culture as one that is open or closed? Do you and your employees operate in a culture of fear or is it a relatively harmonious and engaged environment?

13 books on learning, people, organizations, corporate culture, and change

Jay Cross

A New Culture of Learning by Douglas Thomas and John Seely Brown. This morning I conducted a webinar on Making Learning Stick. Funny, isn’t it, that we invest so much to help people learn and so little to help them remember?

The Organization as a Cycling Peloton

Dan Pontefract

This got me thinking about one of my favourite personal passions (cycling) and our corporate organizations. Maybe if we were to act like a peloton in our organizations, we might see higher levels of employee engagement. It really is a culture of encouragement inside the peloton.

Stop Killing Your Corporate Culture

Dan Pontefract

According to Waterstone Human Capital and their 2010 Canadian Corporate Culture Study Results : 71 per cent of respondents say their organization’s corporate culture drives sales and revenue. This would definitely help stop many corporate cultures from being killed.

the keystone of the intelligent organization

Harold Jarche

The intelligent organization is based on a simple structure that has the flexibility to deal with complex situations. Organizations have to be designed to promote creative and non-routine work, and leave the machines to handle the boring stuff. Culture is built upon daily actions.

Leadership emerges from network culture

Harold Jarche

A new culture emerges. Trust is the glue that holds creative organizations together, not rules and regulations. Culture is an emergent property of people working together. Everyone can practise improv skills and everyone can exert leadership in the organization.

A Nurturing Culture #blimage

Clark Quinn

This to me is a metaphor for the benefits of creating a culture in which learning can flourish. I’ve earlier detailed what the research says about the elements of a learning organization, and it’s clear that you need a culture with several elements.

The new shape of organizations?

Clark Quinn

As I read more about how to create organizations that are resilient and adaptable, there’s an interesting emergent characteristic. While I haven’t had a chance to think about it at scale, like how it would manifest in a large organization, it certainly bears some strengths. More recently, on Harold Jarche ‘s recommendation, I read Niels Pflaeging’s Organize for Complexity , a book also on how to create organizations that are high performance.

Using network perspectives to visualize changing culture and meaning

Ross Dawson

I’m a big fan of Tim Stock ‘s work, which weaves together a deep network perspective with a rich view of how culture is changing informed by semiotic analysis. I earlier shared one of his presentations in a post on how the culture of luxury is changing.

How technology is enabling the humanity of organizations

Ross Dawson

In response to a question on the impact of technology on organizational culture I said: What is more important today than ever before, is not just technology as the enabler, but how technology relates to the humanity of the organization, to the culture of the organization.

Does Your Nonprofit Suffer from Fire Drill Culture?

Beth Kanter

Last week, I was honored to do several workshops hosted by the Fund for Santa Barbara on how nonprofits can link a culture of well being to outcomes based on my book, The Happy Healthy Nonprofit: Strategies for Impact without Burnout. Crisis As Workplace Culture.

Why People Leave Organizations

Kevin Wheeler

People from different cultures respond differently to various factors as do those of different ages. Professor David Finegold and Senior Research Scientist Susan Mohrman, at the Center for Effective Organizations at the University of Southern California presented a paper in the Spring of 2001 at the World Economic Forum in Switzerland entitled: What Do Employees Really Want? Rewards based, in part, on how well the organization performs.

Micro-blogging can help build your organisational culture

Dan Pontefract

As a consequence and according to Gallup Management Journal , this disengaged and disconnected culture (in US-based organisations) is costing $300b per year in lost revenues alone. Moving Towards a Culture of Sharing. Exchanging Ideas; Improving Culture, Knowledge and Networks.

5 Use Cases for a Corporate YouTube in Organizations

Dan Pontefract

Previously I’ve discussed the benefits and uses of micro-blogging , badging and virtual worlds inside an organization. Once you have video sharing in place, what are some of the effective ways in which you can utilize it within your organization?

Paying Attention to Your Nonprofit’s Workplace Culture Pays Off

Beth Kanter

Recently, I was invited to participate in a staff “Lunch and Learn,” by Connor Diemand-Yauman , CEO of Philanthropy University , about building a culture of wellbeing in the nonprofit workplace and capacity building. Many organizations do that.

The Hyper-social Organization – Review

Harold Jarche

The main premise of The Hyper-social Organization is that social media, connectivity and always-on technology are enabling what humans do naturally; to be very social. How much of a “perpetual beta” culture do you have in your company? In a separate study, IDC estimated that only 20 percent of all content developed by the typical marketing department is actually used by the sales organization. Tweet.

The State of Culture, Collaboration & Enterprise 2.0 (Part 1 of 2)

Dan Pontefract

D o you have “ if you build it, they will come ” syndrome in your organization? That is, you’ve been rolling out a litany of Enterprise 2.0 / Collaboration tools at your organization but no one is actually collaborating, contributing or connecting. ” syndrome in your organization?

Nonprofit Organizational Culture Eats Big Data for Lunch

Beth Kanter

Culture Eats Big Data for Lunch – Guest Post by Steve MacLaughlin. Why do some organizations struggle to manage their data? Along the way, I interviewed more than 20 nonprofit experts from a wide variety of organizations. Now, culture is also an overused term these days.

Data 41

Reflections on the Nature of Human Organizations

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

For most of history, the vast majority of people lived in farms and villages, and worked in relatively small organizations. . We learned that in many cases, our human organizations are more efficient the larger they are. Furthermore, larger organizations are typically accompanied by an increase in human interactions which improve their overall creativity and potential for innovation. All that growth generally leads to ever larger, multi-layered hierarchical organizations.

organizations are people

Harold Jarche

” 8 Symptoms Of Organizations On The Cusp Of Change by @MarkRaheja. “In theory, organizations are meant to enable us — to make us faster, stronger and more effective than we’d be on our own.

One Simple Tip To Shift Your Nonprofit’s Workplace Culture from Outrage to Well Being

Beth Kanter

As part of researching and writing the book, we interviewed hundreds of nonprofit professionals about how they create a culture of well being in the workplace. His organization combines healthy eating with communal meals. “As Happy Healthy Nonprofit Organizational Culture

Micro-blogging can help build your organisational culture

Dan Pontefract

As a consequence and according to Gallup Management Journal , this disengaged and disconnected culture (in US-based organisations) is costing $300b per year in lost revenues alone. Moving Towards a Culture of Sharing. Exchanging Ideas; Improving Culture, Knowledge and Networks.

Creating A Culture of Continuous Improvement Based On Data

Beth Kanter

I was most interested in Part 2 (pages 17-21) because I think the advice is applicable to organizations beyond those managing head start programs. This section of the report covers new ways of thinking about organizational culture based in continuous improvement based on feedback.