The Social Network Is the Computer

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

The Social Network Is the Computer. For years, The Network Is the Computer was used as a marketing tagline by Sun Microsystems , - now part of Oracle,- to emphasize that in the Internet age, networked systems and applications were far more powerful than any single computer.

If Your Enterprise Social Network Is a Ghost Town It’s Probably Due To Your Corporate Culture

Dan Pontefract

We deployed our enterprise social network last year, but it’s a ghost town. Tell me, would you describe your culture as one that is open or closed? Do you and your employees operate in a culture of fear or is it a relatively harmonious and engaged environment? In part, it’s why enterprise social networks haven’t fully become a crucial component to an organization’s operating practice. Behaviour Culture employee engagement enterprise 2.0

Insiders

Sign Up for our Newsletter

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

May the Network Force Be With You

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

May the Force Be With You has become part of popular culture since the words were first uttered in the 1977 Star Wars film. Your network force proactively guides you down a path.”. Network effects have led to our rising inequality.

‘Sharing’ culture

Clark Quinn

I was in a recent conversation about a company facing strong growth and worried about the impact on culture. Companies with a positive culture, a valuable offering, and a good business model are liable to face growth issues, and maintaining or starting a good culture becomes a critical issue to maintaining the organization’s success. This company had a positive culture, in that people were diverse, friendly, upbeat, and committed to contributing.

Leadership emerges from network culture

Harold Jarche

A new culture emerges. Culture is an emergent property of people working together. Dave also underlines the fact that over half of your probes will fail and hence the need to have a culture where failure is an option. As networked, distributed workplaces become the norm, trust will emerge from environments that are open, transparent and diverse. Tweet Even five years ago it was not the norm to work at a distance.

An Engaged Culture Improves Performance, Not The Other Way Around

Dan Pontefract

The talk was focused on organizational culture. Dan's Related Posts: The Link Between Leadership, Learning & Organizational Performance Employee Engagement is Still Poor but it Does Drive Bottom Line Results Lessons In Culture From United Airlines If Your Enterprise Social Network Is A Ghost Town It’s Probably Due To Your… Do You Work With A Bully? Culture employee engagement Performance company culture engagement performance

Culture Before Strategy

Clark Quinn

In an insightful article, Ken Majer (full disclosure, a boss of mine many years ago) has written about the need to have the right culture before executing strategy. I have argued that you can get some benefits from the Revolution without having an optimized culture, but you’re not going to tap into the full potential. What Ken is talking about here is ensuring you have values and culture in alignment with the vision and mission.

Measuring Culture Change

Clark Quinn

Someone recently asked how you would go about measuring culture change, and I thought it’s an interesting question. A learning culture is optimal for organizational innovation and agility, and it’s likely that not all elements are already in place. Say, for instance, one desirable outcome of a learning culture would be, well, learning! Of course, if you were expecting other outcomes from your culture initiative, you’d naturally want aligned methods.

stories for the network age

Harold Jarche

The TIMN model [Tribes + Institutions + Markets + Networks] developed by David Ronfeldt has influenced much of my own work in looking at how we are moving toward a network society and must create organizational forms that are beyond national governments and beyond markets.

Culture is entangled

Dave Snowden

Another Gaping Void cartoon for this second post on culture, which makes the point that change initiatives come and go but relationships that we build can last for ever. In practice (and in theory) culture is tangled, indistinct and difficult to tie down. Cynthia Kurtz and I used Alicia Juarrero's idea of Brambles in a thicket as the title of our article on network cultures and how they work.

The Connected Culture

Dan Pontefract

A ‘ connected culture ’ is one that simultaneously drives organizational clarity with precarious innovation. A ‘ connected culture’ , in its simplest, orderly and most chaotic form, refers to the point at which all employees act as one corporate organism. The ‘ connected culture’ of an organization is the point at which chaos meets order coupled by an infinite and unobstructed flow of corporate commonality.

OMG, its culture change time

Dave Snowden

If in doubt, blame the culture seems to be a golden rule in consultancy and management alike. And of course once blame has been allocated we end up with a visitation from the cultural change specialists with their tool kit of communication plans, key drivers, motivational posters, games and the like. He starts by belittling the its the way we do things around here definition of culture by referencing the hopelessness of conventional attempts to change process.

Culture is our nature

Harold Jarche

And we did it by developing new abilities for cultural transmission and change. As the anthropologist Pascal Boyer points out in his answer, it’s tempting to talk about “the culture” of a group as if this is some mysterious force outside the biological individual or independent of evolution. But culture is a biological phenomenon. Culture is our nature, and the ability to learn and change is our most important and fundamental instinct.

Culture of Hope

David Weinberger

Forum d’Avignon is an annual get-together in France to talk about culture, by which most of the attendees (and especially President Sarkozy who came to give a speech ) mean how they can squash the Internet and retain their stranglehold on culture. Does culture / creative imagination give you a reason to hope?” If not culture, then what would give us reason to hope? Culture flourishes when it is open, abundant, connected, engaged, and diverse.

Using network perspectives to visualize changing culture and meaning

Trends in the Living Networks

I’m a big fan of Tim Stock ‘s work, which weaves together a deep network perspective with a rich view of how culture is changing informed by semiotic analysis. I earlier shared one of his presentations in a post on how the culture of luxury is changing. The slides to his presentation at SXSW today on Culture Networks and the codes that drive them are available below. Culture Networks (SXSW 2012).

The Connected Culture

Dan Pontefract

A ‘ connected culture ’ is one that simultaneously drives organizational clarity with precarious innovation. A ‘ connected culture’ , in its simplest, orderly and most chaotic form, refers to the point at which all employees act as one corporate organism. The ‘ connected culture’ of an organization is the point at which chaos meets order coupled by an infinite and unobstructed flow of corporate commonality.

Micro-Blogging is Good for Leadership, Good for Your Culture

Dan Pontefract

So what has this got to do with leadership and culture? This can do so much for the organization in terms of leadership and culture, including: Better understanding of what is going on in the organization across many teams & projects. That’s a culture I would want to be a part of. Tags: Culture social networking formal informal micro-blogging social social learning twitter yammer Inside the organization, a dilemma now exists and is rapidly taking shape.

Building a Culture of Continuous Learning

Charles Jennings

The part that formal, directed learning plays in overall organisational capability may be important at times, but organisations aspiring towards Peter Senge’s ‘learning organization’ – in other words, creating a culture of continuous learning - need to reach beyond simply improving structured training. The CEB study was particularly focused on ‘ network performance’ – the outcomes achieved with and through others. Most people get it.

Internet culture

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

Peer power : Networks subvert hierarchy. If your learning plans don’t embrace the power of networks, go back the drawing board. Learning occurs through conversations, collaboration, knowledge transfer and other network phenomena. Chief Learning Officer magazine , Effectiveness, April 2009. by Jay Cross. The Internet is so pervasive that Internet values are blowing back into real life.

Micro-blogging can help build your organisational culture

Dan Pontefract

As a consequence and according to Gallup Management Journal , this disengaged and disconnected culture (in US-based organisations) is costing $300b per year in lost revenues alone. Moving Towards a Culture of Sharing. According to research published by McKinsey and Company in December, 2010, only 13% of companies felt as though micro-blogging was actually enhancing company culture. Exchanging Ideas; Improving Culture, Knowledge and Networks.

implementing network learning

Harold Jarche

In the network era , developing the skills of a master artisan in every field of work will be critical for success. New ideas will have to come from our professional networks in order to keep pace with innovation and change in our fields. The essence of my network learning model is that knowledge flows between individuals engaged in doing work and sharing with their communities and social networks. Implementing the network learning model has many facets.

Open Spaces, Open Minds Redux (An Open 2.0 Culture)

Dan Pontefract

It is another example of how we are closing our minds, walling our innovation, and foregoing a more productive and networked organization. culture can and will instil said openness, imagination, growth, and promotion of ideas and innovation. Our organizations need to embrace the open culture, Enterprise 2.0, The intelligence being returned to the organization through an open culture, leading to innovation, engagement and overarching profitability. Culture enterprise 2.0

organizing for the network era

Harold Jarche

The network era, with digital electric communications, changes this. Last year I described several of my principles and models for the network era and showed how they related to each other. I would like to put these together in a coherent framework to show how we can design organizations for the network era, instead of ones optimized for markets, institutions, or tribes. The network era needs new structures, not modified versions of obsolete models.

Reviewing "A New Culture of Learning"

John Hagel

  My colleague and friend, John Seely Brown, has just come out with “A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change” , co-authored with Doug Thomas, a professor at the University of Southern California.  We believe that this new culture of learning can augment learning in nearly every facet of education and every stage of life. In that sense they are paragons of an almost unlimited information network.

Review 183

Did Zappos Just Ruin Their Culture Or Is It A Brilliant Org Redesign?

Dan Pontefract

Three years later, he founded LinkExchange — an online advertising network incorporating the use of banner ads — and promptly sold it to Microsoft in 1998 for $265 million. In a word, it’s all about “ culture.” Their collaborative mindset is infectious, one that encourages everyone to scale the culture. It’s an act of recognition, but it’s the opportunity for all Zappos employees to scale the culture.

Knowledge is the network

David Weinberger

First, we probably have about the same number of smart people as we did twenty years ago, so what’s making us all smarter is that we’re on a network together. Second, the network has evolved a culture in which there’s nothing wrong with not knowing. Knowledge once was developed among small networks of people. Now knowledge is the network. &nbsp. I forked yesterday for the first time. I’m pretty thrilled.

Have social networks replaced groups?

David Weinberger

Likewise, Facebook, Google Groups, Twitter, and the other dominant forms of “social software” (to use the term from 2003) are amazing at building social networks. At those sites you can jump into borderless networks, connecting to everyone else by some degree. ” If the walls around the group don’t include and exclude the same people for each member, then it’s a network, not a group.

Groups 185

network learning cities

Harold Jarche

Its main dynamic is kinship, which gives people a distinct sense of identity and belonging — the basic elements of culture, as manifested still today in matters ranging from nationalism to fan clubs. The network form, the fourth to mature, serves to connect dispersed groups and individuals so that they may coordinate and act conjointly. This is also bringing tensions between the old Tribal, Institutional, and Market forms against the emerging Network form.

Micro-blogging can help build your organisational culture

Dan Pontefract

As a consequence and according to Gallup Management Journal , this disengaged and disconnected culture (in US-based organisations) is costing $300b per year in lost revenues alone. Moving Towards a Culture of Sharing. According to research published by McKinsey and Company in December, 2010, only 13% of companies felt as though micro-blogging was actually enhancing company culture. Exchanging Ideas; Improving Culture, Knowledge and Networks.

Technology, Media and Culture - the Best of Times or the Worst of Times?

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

USC’s Annenberg Innovation Lab (AIL) was founded in 2010 to study the transformational impact of technology on culture and on the media industries. For a technologist like me, it’s been a unique opportunity to learn about the impact of technology on society through the lens of the culture being transformed. How can you best understand the impact of disruptive technologies on something as deeply human as culture? Innovation Society and Culture Technology and Strategy

networked failure and learning

Harold Jarche

Think networks of influence. Just as cultures are not static, neither are our identities. Bonnitta Roy: I do a workshop on developing trust networks, and it is always a surprise to discover how little we agree on what trust is, and how it operates in our lives. When you feel into this notion of a trust network, other people you know from personal or work life will not make it into the inner circles at all.

[2b2k] A New Culture of Learning

David Weinberger

If you want to read a brilliant application of some of the ideas in Too Big to Know to our educational system, read A New Culture of Learning by Douglas Thomas and John Seely Brown. What they call a “collective,” I call a “knowledge network.” This, they say, leads to a new “culture of learning” (117).

Networked sharing

Harold Jarche

Why diversity is essential for innovation, and ultimately survival, is shown in this wide-ranging article on How Culture Drove Innovation : You start out with two genetically well-intermixed peoples. It’s not about innovative individuals so much as the ability of the network (society, organization, company) to stay connected to its collective knowledge. Are your knowledge networks large enough to ensure that collective knowledge does not get lost?

Leadership for the Network Era

Harold Jarche

The TIMN [Tribes + Institutions + Markets + Networks] model shows how society grew from a collection of tribes, added institutions, and later developed markets. The network era began with the advent of electric communications, though it is by no means completely established. As we enter the network era, we see companies like Apple dominating, often ignoring Wall Street pundits. It is not networked. It is networked. It is networked, as well.

What Universities Must Learn About Social Networks

Jay Cross

What Universities Must Learning About Social Networks. THE ISSUE IS NOT whether you are going to become a socially networked university but how soon. A social business is one where all the members of the corporate ecosystem (employees, customers, partners, and customers) network with one another to delight their customers. IBM describes socially networked corporations as the next step in the overall evolution of business. Networks are the glue that connects us.

Networks and Power

Harold Jarche

gideonro – Curating Smart Networks. Most of us use social networks for social purposes. When you look at what these individuals actually do with their time on these networks, you see that theyre spending as much time curating their connections with people as curating their content. It has influenced all aspects of our work, and has evolved our culture. Here are some observations and insights that were shared on social media this past fortnight.

Innovation is a network activity

Harold Jarche

But of more importance is the ability of the network (society, organization, company) to stay connected to its collective knowledge in order to keep innovating. – How Culture Drove Human Evolution. Are your knowledge networks large and diverse enough to ensure that collective knowledge does not get lost? Innovation is not brilliant flashes of individual insight but collective learning through social networks. No networks, no learning.

Network walking

Harold Jarche

Tweet In Network Thinking I said that as we learn in digital networks, stock (content) loses significance, while flow (conversation) becomes more important – the challenge becomes how to continuously weave the many bits of information and knowledge that pass by us each day. There is an existing managerial culture that says we need to measure things in order to control them.

A world of pervasive networks

Harold Jarche

Here is de Kerckhove’s view of a new kind of identity in our world of pervasive networks: The key to the new identity is what I call “selving”, that is the self in progress, in becoming, as in quantum physics where “things are not, they merely tend to be”. In exploring the effects of pervasive networks in our lives, I see this possible tetrad: extends democracy to the workplace, as can be seen from growing number of organizations recognized by WorldBlu.

Changing Cultures in Higher Education

Jay Cross

Last week I received a nice surprise in the mail, Changing Cultures in Higher Education (Ulf Daniel Ehlers and Dirk Schneckberg eds.) tools give learners more control, by allowing them to easily create, share or reuse their own learning materials, and these tools also enable social learning networks that bridge the border between formal and informal learning.

Investing in Culture

Clark Quinn

A recent webinar announcement from i4pc touted how a American Management Association survey concluded: “ one of best ways to avoid becoming victim of the economy is to focus on corporate culture&#. That’s great reinforcement, as culture is one of the components of improving organizational learning infrastructure. Of course, I recommend you take the broader steps, not just culture, but culture is key.

Everything’s Coming Up Networks (except learning)

Jay Cross

Sloan Management Review has a great interview with Andy McAfee on What Sells CEOs on Social Networking. ” They understand the power of weak ties in enterprise social networks. Sure, there are fears of losing control, the fact that hierarchy and social networks are not comfortable bedfellows, and the inevitable paradigm drag. Social networks are so patently good for business that managers are routing around IT to put them in place. Networks were made for learning.

Is Your Company Culture Linked to Social Learning Success?

Dan Pontefract

A wonderful article was recently posted by Marcia Conner and Steve LeBlanc over at Fast Company entitled “ Where Social Learning Thrives “ The entire piece purports that a fun, productive and consistent culture will help ensure social learning takes flight. What struck me, however, is the following line itself: Social learning thrives in a culture of service and wonder. Tags: Culture social learning collaboration