If Your Enterprise Social Network Is a Ghost Town It’s Probably Due To Your Corporate Culture

Dan Pontefract

We deployed our enterprise social network last year, but it’s a ghost town. Tell me, would you describe your culture as one that is open or closed? Do you and your employees operate in a culture of fear or is it a relatively harmonious and engaged environment?

An Engaged Culture Improves Performance, Not The Other Way Around

Dan Pontefract

The talk was focused on organizational culture. Culture employee engagement Performance company culture engagement performanceA vice-president approached me one day after I finished delivering a keynote. He was friendly, but rather cocky. The first.

Leadership emerges from network culture

Harold Jarche

A new culture emerges. Culture is an emergent property of people working together. Dave also underlines the fact that over half of your probes will fail and hence the need to have a culture where failure is an option.

culture is complex

Harold Jarche

My network helps to keep me informed. The famous quote attributed to Peter Drucker is that “culture eats strategy for breakfast” French culture is not unaffected by international business pressures, as witnessed by the fast food outlets everywhere. Culture is complex.

Culture is entangled

Dave Snowden

Another Gaping Void cartoon for this second post on culture, which makes the point that change initiatives come and go but relationships that we build can last for ever. In practice (and in theory) culture is tangled, indistinct and difficult to tie down.

Using network perspectives to visualize changing culture and meaning

Ross Dawson

I’m a big fan of Tim Stock ‘s work, which weaves together a deep network perspective with a rich view of how culture is changing informed by semiotic analysis. I earlier shared one of his presentations in a post on how the culture of luxury is changing.

The Connected Culture

Dan Pontefract

A ‘ connected culture ’ is one that simultaneously drives organizational clarity with precarious innovation. A ‘ connected culture’ , in its simplest, orderly and most chaotic form, refers to the point at which all employees act as one corporate organism.

Building a Culture of Continuous Learning

Charles Jennings

The CEB study was particularly focused on ‘ network performance’ – the outcomes achieved with and through others. The 52 Weeks program initially started as a way to communicate company culture and values to new employees. Most people get it.

‘Sharing’ culture

Clark Quinn

I was in a recent conversation about a company facing strong growth and worried about the impact on culture. Companies with a positive culture, a valuable offering, and a good business model are liable to face growth issues, and maintaining or starting a good culture becomes a critical issue to maintaining the organization’s success. This company had a positive culture, in that people were diverse, friendly, upbeat, and committed to contributing.

Measuring Culture Change

Clark Quinn

Someone recently asked how you would go about measuring culture change, and I thought it’s an interesting question. A learning culture is optimal for organizational innovation and agility, and it’s likely that not all elements are already in place. Say, for instance, one desirable outcome of a learning culture would be, well, learning! Of course, if you were expecting other outcomes from your culture initiative, you’d naturally want aligned methods.

Culture Before Strategy

Clark Quinn

In an insightful article, Ken Majer (full disclosure, a boss of mine many years ago) has written about the need to have the right culture before executing strategy. I have argued that you can get some benefits from the Revolution without having an optimized culture, but you’re not going to tap into the full potential. What Ken is talking about here is ensuring you have values and culture in alignment with the vision and mission.

Culture is our nature

Harold Jarche

And we did it by developing new abilities for cultural transmission and change. But culture is a biological phenomenon. Culture is our nature, and the ability to learn and change is our most important and fundamental instinct.

The Connected Culture

Dan Pontefract

A ‘ connected culture ’ is one that simultaneously drives organizational clarity with precarious innovation. A ‘ connected culture’ , in its simplest, orderly and most chaotic form, refers to the point at which all employees act as one corporate organism.

Micro-Blogging is Good for Leadership, Good for Your Culture

Dan Pontefract

So what has this got to do with leadership and culture? This can do so much for the organization in terms of leadership and culture, including: Better understanding of what is going on in the organization across many teams & projects. That’s a culture I would want to be a part of.

Internet culture

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

Peer power : Networks subvert hierarchy. If your learning plans don’t embrace the power of networks, go back the drawing board. Learning occurs through conversations, collaboration, knowledge transfer and other network phenomena.

Micro-blogging can help build your organisational culture

Dan Pontefract

As a consequence and according to Gallup Management Journal , this disengaged and disconnected culture (in US-based organisations) is costing $300b per year in lost revenues alone. Moving Towards a Culture of Sharing. Exchanging Ideas; Improving Culture, Knowledge and Networks.

our future is networked and feminine

Harold Jarche

As we enter an era where the Network form (T+I+M+N) gains dominance, most of the previous organizational forms will evolve to adapt to the new form. The Network form puts into question our current market dominated forms, including our institutions and our families.

Culture of Hope

David Weinberger

Forum d’Avignon is an annual get-together in France to talk about culture, by which most of the attendees (and especially President Sarkozy who came to give a speech ) mean how they can squash the Internet and retain their stranglehold on culture. Does culture / creative imagination give you a reason to hope?” If not culture, then what would give us reason to hope? Culture flourishes when it is open, abundant, connected, engaged, and diverse.

Open Spaces, Open Minds Redux (An Open 2.0 Culture)

Dan Pontefract

It is another example of how we are closing our minds, walling our innovation, and foregoing a more productive and networked organization. culture can and will instil said openness, imagination, growth, and promotion of ideas and innovation. Culture enterprise 2.0

implementing network learning

Harold Jarche

In the network era , developing the skills of a master artisan in every field of work will be critical for success. New ideas will have to come from our professional networks in order to keep pace with innovation and change in our fields.

Did Zappos Just Ruin Their Culture Or Is It A Brilliant Org Redesign?

Dan Pontefract

Three years later, he founded LinkExchange — an online advertising network incorporating the use of banner ads — and promptly sold it to Microsoft in 1998 for $265 million. In a word, it’s all about “ culture.” Culture can grow in other ways, too.

organizing for the network era

Harold Jarche

The network era, with digital electric communications, changes this. Last year I described several of my principles and models for the network era and showed how they related to each other. The network era needs new structures, not modified versions of obsolete models.

Knowledge is the network

David Weinberger

First, we probably have about the same number of smart people as we did twenty years ago, so what’s making us all smarter is that we’re on a network together. Second, the network has evolved a culture in which there’s nothing wrong with not knowing.

Technology, Media and Culture - the Best of Times or the Worst of Times?

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

USC’s Annenberg Innovation Lab (AIL) was founded in 2010 to study the transformational impact of technology on culture and on the media industries. How can you best understand the impact of disruptive technologies on something as deeply human as culture?

Micro-blogging can help build your organisational culture

Dan Pontefract

As a consequence and according to Gallup Management Journal , this disengaged and disconnected culture (in US-based organisations) is costing $300b per year in lost revenues alone. Moving Towards a Culture of Sharing. Exchanging Ideas; Improving Culture, Knowledge and Networks.

network learning cities

Harold Jarche

Its main dynamic is kinship, which gives people a distinct sense of identity and belonging — the basic elements of culture, as manifested still today in matters ranging from nationalism to fan clubs. ” The Network Era.

networked failure and learning

Harold Jarche

Think networks of influence. Just as cultures are not static, neither are our identities. Bonnitta Roy: I do a workshop on developing trust networks, and it is always a surprise to discover how little we agree on what trust is, and how it operates in our lives.

Leadership for the Network Era

Harold Jarche

The TIMN [Tribes + Institutions + Markets + Networks] model shows how society grew from a collection of tribes, added institutions, and later developed markets. The network era began with the advent of electric communications, though it is by no means completely established.

What Universities Must Learn About Social Networks

Jay Cross

What Universities Must Learning About Social Networks. THE ISSUE IS NOT whether you are going to become a socially networked university but how soon. IBM describes socially networked corporations as the next step in the overall evolution of business. Networks Social Learning

The Cultural Impact of The Future of You

Luis Suarez

In “ Cultural Impact of Social Networking in Defining the Workplace of the Future ” you would be able to see my attempt of describing the new kind of skills set that knowledge Web workers would need to excel at if they would want to thrive in an Open Business environment.

Networked sharing

Harold Jarche

Why diversity is essential for innovation, and ultimately survival, is shown in this wide-ranging article on How Culture Drove Innovation : You start out with two genetically well-intermixed peoples.

Reviewing "A New Culture of Learning"

John Hagel

  My colleague and friend, John Seely Brown, has just come out with “A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change” , co-authored with Doug Thomas, a professor at the University of Southern California.  We believe that this new culture of learning can augment learning in nearly every facet of education and every stage of life. In that sense they are paragons of an almost unlimited information network.

Review 183

Innovation is a network activity

Harold Jarche

But of more importance is the ability of the network (society, organization, company) to stay connected to its collective knowledge in order to keep innovating. – How Culture Drove Human Evolution. No networks, no learning.

Network walking

Harold Jarche

Tweet In Network Thinking I said that as we learn in digital networks, stock (content) loses significance, while flow (conversation) becomes more important – the challenge becomes how to continuously weave the many bits of information and knowledge that pass by us each day.

A world of pervasive networks

Harold Jarche

Here is de Kerckhove’s view of a new kind of identity in our world of pervasive networks: The key to the new identity is what I call “selving”, that is the self in progress, in becoming, as in quantum physics where “things are not, they merely tend to be”.

Changing Cultures in Higher Education

Jay Cross

Last week I received a nice surprise in the mail, Changing Cultures in Higher Education (Ulf Daniel Ehlers and Dirk Schneckberg eds.) Springer. Congratulations, guys. 610 pages for a mere $126. It’s good to see that Springer is maintaining its sense of humor. Don’t get me wrong.

Have social networks replaced groups?

David Weinberger

Likewise, Facebook, Google Groups, Twitter, and the other dominant forms of “social software” (to use the term from 2003) are amazing at building social networks. At those sites you can jump into borderless networks, connecting to everyone else by some degree. ” If the walls around the group don’t include and exclude the same people for each member, then it’s a network, not a group.

Groups 185

Networks and Power

Harold Jarche

gideonro – Curating Smart Networks. Most of us use social networks for social purposes. It has influenced all aspects of our work, and has evolved our culture. Here are some observations and insights that were shared on social media this past fortnight.

Is Your Company Culture Linked to Social Learning Success?

Dan Pontefract

A wonderful article was recently posted by Marcia Conner and Steve LeBlanc over at Fast Company entitled “ Where Social Learning Thrives “ The entire piece purports that a fun, productive and consistent culture will help ensure social learning takes flight.

The Networked NGO in Pakistan

Beth Kanter

Networked NGOs and Social Media Integrated Into Organizational Communications. Her knowledge of the country and the culture made it easier to localize the curriculum. Integrate Practical Use of the Tools for Reflection, Network Weaving, Getting Ideas, Follow Up Work.

a collective networked perspective

Harold Jarche

A network society needs networked models for organizing and for learning. Large scale cooperation should be the dominant model in the network era, if not we may revert back to a tribal era.

Everything’s Coming Up Networks (except learning)

Jay Cross

Sloan Management Review has a great interview with Andy McAfee on What Sells CEOs on Social Networking. ” They understand the power of weak ties in enterprise social networks. David describes leadership as an emergent property of an organizational network.

[2b2k] A New Culture of Learning

David Weinberger

If you want to read a brilliant application of some of the ideas in Too Big to Know to our educational system, read A New Culture of Learning by Douglas Thomas and John Seely Brown. What they call a “collective,” I call a “knowledge network.” This, they say, leads to a new “culture of learning” (117).