Culture: the subject

Dave Snowden

The Oxford English Dictionary defines culture as “The arts and other manifestations of human intellectual achievement regarded collectively” and “The ideas, customs, and social behaviour of a particular people or society”. I’d seen enough attempts to engineer culture by publishing platitudinous cliches on a cyclical basis to have lost all faith in the explicit, future focused attempts to create a desired culture. Culture Cynefin

Management Musings: Episode 3 – Corporate Culture Weather Forecast

Dan Pontefract

Yep, the corporate culture weather forecast for this week and the next five months… The post Management Musings: Episode 3 – Corporate Culture Weather Forecast appeared first on Pontefract Group. Culture leadership Management Musings remote work hybrid work

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Cultural Comment Shift

Clark Quinn

The phenomena is that we’re seeing a cultural comment shift; comments are now coming from shared platforms, not directly on the site. With the proliferation of places to go: from Facebook and Twitter and LinkedIn to a variety of group tools and Instragram and Pinterest and…the list goes on. The cultural comment shift is merely an indicator of a bigger cultural shift, and as long as we can ride it, we’re good.

Have social networks replaced groups?

David Weinberger

But his comment, plus a discussion yesterday with Andrew Preater , a library technologist at the Imperial College of London, made me think how little progress we’ve in fact made in supporting groups on the Net. Since 2003, there are now services that bundle together these different modalities: Skype and Google Hangouts both let a group talk, video, chat, and share documents. What’s missing is the concept of a group. A group can be widely open.

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Culture 7 of 7: Completion

Dave Snowden

A cultural change initiative is a device of last resort, it means you’ve failed to maintain a suitable resilient system and have to do some type of reset. That engagement is at the level of the groups capability to act in the short term – its not about talking about what other people should do. Culture is manifested in what we do, not what we say about why we want to do things. The post Culture 7 of 7: Completion appeared first on Cognitive Edge. Culture Cynefi

culture is complex

Harold Jarche

The famous quote attributed to Peter Drucker is that “culture eats strategy for breakfast” French culture is not unaffected by international business pressures, as witnessed by the fast food outlets everywhere. Travel helps you understand culture. Form formal study group. ” Understanding culture is something that AI cannot do. Culture is complex. I am in a rural village in France enjoying my last day here before heading home.

The Vital Role of Culture in Business

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

The January-February issue of the Harvard Business Review spotlights The Culture Factor, with five articles on the subject. “ Culture is the tacit social order of an organization: It shapes attitudes and behaviors in wide-ranging and durable ways,” notes the issue’s lead article. “ Cultural norms define what is encouraged, discouraged, accepted, or rejected within a group. Attributes of Culture. Cultural Styles. Levers for Evolving Culture.

Culture 6 of 7: Adjustments

Dave Snowden

In any art work the final adjustments mean that we are nearing completion, in cultural change I want to argue, it is the sign that the process is only just starting. In an ideal world managing culture would be a constantly evolving process; multiple small micro-changes with a feedback loop in near real time that allows the process to be navigated. Culture is more like an estuary with strong and weak currents and constantly shifting sandbanks, assuming stability is a danger.

Culture is entangled

Dave Snowden

Another Gaping Void cartoon for this second post on culture, which makes the point that change initiatives come and go but relationships that we build can last for ever. In practice (and in theory) culture is tangled, indistinct and difficult to tie down. Cynthia Kurtz and I used Alicia Juarrero's idea of Brambles in a thicket as the title of our article on network cultures and how they work.

There Is Nothing Wrong With The Term ‘Company Culture’

Dan Pontefract

The headline from Harvard Business Review read, Why “Company Culture” Is a Misleading Term. “Organizational culture is assumed to be important to making sure that employees are happy and productivity is good. At the same time, the concept, meaning, and function of culture rarely garners much thought.” I’m here to defend the term, “Company Culture” But first, a bit of a background to the author.

The Vital Role of Culture in Business

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

The January-February issue of the Harvard Business Review spotlights The Culture Factor, with five articles on the subject. “ Culture is the tacit social order of an organization: It shapes attitudes and behaviors in wide-ranging and durable ways,” notes the issue’s lead article. “ Cultural norms define what is encouraged, discouraged, accepted, or rejected within a group. Attributes of Culture. Cultural Styles. Levers for Evolving Culture.

OMG, its culture change time

Dave Snowden

If in doubt, blame the culture seems to be a golden rule in consultancy and management alike. And of course once blame has been allocated we end up with a visitation from the cultural change specialists with their tool kit of communication plans, key drivers, motivational posters, games and the like. He starts by belittling the its the way we do things around here definition of culture by referencing the hopelessness of conventional attempts to change process.

Changing Culture: Scaling Up Excellence

Clark Quinn

I’ve found myself picking up books about how to change culture, as it seems to be the big barrier to a successful revolution. I’ve finished a quick read of Scaling Up Excellence , am in the midst of Change the Culture, Change the Game , and have Reinventing Organizations and Organize for Complexity (the latter two recommended by my colleague Harold Jarche ) on deck. If separate groups do this, the inputs can help address potential risks, and emphasize useful actions.

Culture is our nature

Harold Jarche

And we did it by developing new abilities for cultural transmission and change. As the anthropologist Pascal Boyer points out in his answer, it’s tempting to talk about “the culture” of a group as if this is some mysterious force outside the biological individual or independent of evolution. But culture is a biological phenomenon. Culture is our nature, and the ability to learn and change is our most important and fundamental instinct.

The Power of 2: Marcia Conner & Altimeter Group

Dan Pontefract

Marcia Conner has now teamed up with the Altimeter Group. Which brings me to the Altimeter Group. Altimeter Group, through the guidance of Charlene Li , have built up a brilliant practice over the past two years providing “thought leadership, research, and advisory on digital strategies, with a core focus on how companies can leverage disruptive technologies.”. collaborative culture, and of course all-things Learning 2.0 More info via Altimeter Group here.

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Lessons In Culture From United Airlines

Dan Pontefract

Because United is affiliated with the Star Alliance group—and I’ve fallen head-deep into the business travel trap of collecting air miles—when I’m trying to get back to British Columbia and Air Canada does not fly direct, I am forced to use United Airlines. Specifically, I wanted to know if she felt their new CEO, Oscar Muñoz, would bring any change to the company, its culture and its operating practices. “Oh Culture employee engagement engagement United Airlines

Penultimate: forget cultural change

Dave Snowden

Yesterday I argued that compatible but different cultures had more resilient than a "common culture". Having tackled one of the shibboleths of OD and HR practice I thought I would move onto another namely cultural change. You know how it runs, a group of senior executives go off site with some expensive management consultants. He erected a tent near Birmingham and all staff were encouraged to go to all day sessions to inculcate them with the new culture.

Thank You To The Clients Who Hired Me In 2020

Dan Pontefract

A short video of thanks to the organizations that hired the Pontefract Group and me (Dan Pontefract) for culture assessments, consultative work, workshops, keynotes, and… The post Thank You To The Clients Who Hired Me In 2020 appeared first on Pontefract Group.

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The Economic and Cultural Polarization of America

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

For most of our nation’s history, whatever the inequality in wealth between the richest and poorest citizens, we maintained a cultural equality known nowhere else in the world - for whites, anyway.” There was a common civic culture, - the American way of life , - “that swept an extremely large proportion of Americans of all classes into its embrace. You might say the country has bifurcated into different social tribes, with a tenuous common culture linking them.”

If Your Enterprise Social Network Is a Ghost Town It’s Probably Due To Your Corporate Culture

Dan Pontefract

Tell me, would you describe your culture as one that is open or closed? Do you and your employees operate in a culture of fear or is it a relatively harmonious and engaged environment? Quite frankly, that saddens me because although technology isn’t the answer, enterprise social networks can do so much good for an organization’s culture and engagement. Like me, Charlene is a crusader for a more open and collaborative culture.

Micro-blogging can help build your organisational culture

Dan Pontefract

As a consequence and according to Gallup Management Journal , this disengaged and disconnected culture (in US-based organisations) is costing $300b per year in lost revenues alone. Moving Towards a Culture of Sharing. According to research published by McKinsey and Company in December, 2010, only 13% of companies felt as though micro-blogging was actually enhancing company culture. Exchanging Ideas; Improving Culture, Knowledge and Networks.

XPLANE joins Dachis Group

Dave Gray

Effective this morning, XPLANE is joining the Dachis Group , the world’s leading social business consultancy, as a wholly-owned subsidiary. Initially, the only change employees and customers will notice is the Dachis Group logo on our home page. But joining the Dachis Group is a strategic move for our company and for our customers. Here’s why I am excited about it: First, Dachis Group is backed by Austin Ventures to the tune of $50 million.

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The Tale of Two Cultures

Jay Cross

Snow wrote an essay describing the “two cultures, whose thesis was that ‘the intellectual life of the whole of western society’ was split into two cultures — namely the sciences and the humanities — and that this was a major hindrance to solving the world’s problems. As the world grew more complex, the two groups grew further apart.” Half a century later, the world grows more complex everyday and the two cultures have grow further apart.

The Tale of Two Cultures

Jay Cross

Snow wrote an essay describing the “two cultures, whose thesis was that ‘the intellectual life of the whole of western society’ was split into two cultures — namely the sciences and the humanities — and that this was a major hindrance to solving the world’s problems. As the world grew more complex, the two groups grew further apart.” Half a century later, the world grows more complex everyday and the two cultures have grow further apart.

Micro-blogging can help build your organisational culture

Dan Pontefract

As a consequence and according to Gallup Management Journal , this disengaged and disconnected culture (in US-based organisations) is costing $300b per year in lost revenues alone. Moving Towards a Culture of Sharing. According to research published by McKinsey and Company in December, 2010, only 13% of companies felt as though micro-blogging was actually enhancing company culture. Exchanging Ideas; Improving Culture, Knowledge and Networks.

[avignon] Google’s Cultural Institute

David Weinberger

Steve Crossan, head of the Cultural Institute in Paris, is demo-ing Google’s super spiffy swirling virtual bookcase. The Cultural Institute was set up in April. It’s a group of engineers. They’re building tools and services for the cultural sector, to help people get to online content in an emotionally engaging way. In a virtual world, what shall one do with a physical space to explore culture?

Re-reading A New Culture of Learning

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

A New Culture of Learning by John Seely Brown and Doug Thomas. In the new culture of learning, people learn through their interaction and participation with one another in fluid relationships that are the result of shared interests and opportunity. Simply by being among the people around them—in study groups, for instance—students are learning from their environment, participating in an experience rich in resources of deep encounters.

[2b2k] A New Culture of Learning

David Weinberger

If you want to read a brilliant application of some of the ideas in Too Big to Know to our educational system, read A New Culture of Learning by Douglas Thomas and John Seely Brown. ” With more than a hat tip to Michael Polanyi , they talk insightfully about “collective indwelling,” which is the depth of insight and topical competency that comes from a group iterating on ideas over time. This, they say, leads to a new “culture of learning” (117).

Culture and Design: Collective Versus Individual Progress

Adaptive Path

This collection of observations has made me realize just how deeply culture and cultural differences impact the practice of design. Culture and Design" is the overall theme I have chosen to write about in a series of posts covering the following topics: Culture of legacy and preservation versus culture from scratch. Culture of collective progress versus culture of individual progress. Culture of rhetoric versus culture of making.

On Corporate Language

Dan Pontefract

Having spent two decades fighting the battle of corporate language from within at two huge organizations, I learned this: First, new language that is abnormal… The post On Corporate Language appeared first on Pontefract Group. Behaviour communication Culture corporate culture Writing

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The last thing you want is a common culture

Dave Snowden

Culture is one of the most abused words on the OD lexicon and one of the most common mistakes is to assume that if an organisation has a common culture it is necessarily a good thing. It can also reduce the alienation inherent in imposed cultural norms. Choose one culture and the consequences if you get it wrong are high, it may seem tasty at the time but long term obesity (well it was too good a cartoon not to use) is a less attractive consequence.

Culture 3 of 7: Identify the big shapes

Dave Snowden

While having specific goals is not possible in a complex system, and any cultural change is complex, it doesn’t mean that we can’t have a sense of direction and/or purpose. So what are the big shapes in culture change? I remember in one IBM project we gave a group of consultants a full time bookkeeper to manage their expenses and timesheets. I’m giving that as a warning and a teaching case – structure can be achieved in many ways and how you do it determines culture.

Economic Catastrophe (& more culture)

Clark Quinn

I’ve already talked about investing in culture , and I want to reiterate and elaborate on that message. I listened to a free webinar the other day via the Institute for Corporate Productivity , where they’d done a survey on companies and asked about their culture. There was good news in their results: there was a significant correlation between the assessment of cultural elements surveyed and the success of the company.

A cultural view of agony

Mind Hacks

New Statesman has a fascinating article on the ‘cultural history of pain’ that tracks how our ideas about pain and suffering have radically changed through the years. One if the most interesting, and worrying, themes is how there have been lots of cultural beliefs about whether certain groups are more or less sensitive to pain. But this distinction was used to denigrate “outsider” groups even further.

Blogs vs. Discussion Groups

Tony Karrer

The debate about blogs vs. discussion groups is heating up again between TrDev and Blogs vs. Listservs: Which is Better for Community Conversation? eLearning Discussions - An Attempt at Better Discussions in the Blogosphere Move from Discussion Groups to World of Blogs? Blogs vs. Discussion Groups or Mis-Understanding Blog Reading and. However, the two have a tendancy to have different norms/culture emerge.

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That Group Feeling

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

But that group feeling never left me – nor the memory of the price I would have to pay to join. With the computer operations team at GSI , until new managers were imported from Texas and all our groups broken up. With, even, the e-learning group here in Moncton, until it was dismantled. Recitation of the group mantra. For humans, being in a group is a survival tactic. We need the group – we need it to survive, we need it at a deep and primitive level.

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What are you doing right now to redesign your place of work before employees return to the building?

Dan Pontefract

appeared first on Pontefract Group. Culture employee engagement employees Real Estate corporate culture design real estateThe pandemic has certainly taught us one thing about organizations: we don’t need as much physical space for work to happen.

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Create a Collaborative Company Culture with an LMS

TOPYX LMS

Some companies have a culture that is richly collaborative. Does your company host this type of culture? The game plan for creating a collaborative company culture is so simple that it’s easy to miss, and it involves implementing an LMS, or an eLearning system. Christopher Pappas, writer for eLearning industry, encourages administrators to “ create a live event that involves group discussion, debate, and/or further exploration of a particular topic. In 1915, Edward C.

10th Anniversary of the OnlineFacilitation Group

Nancy White

When we started, there were very few places to talk about facilitating online groups and communities. Now there are groups springing up all over , and some steadfast old-timers as well. Last week I asked people to share some stories about their involvement with the group. All I did was start the group. Subject: [of] Re: 10th Anniversary of OnlineFacilitation Yahoo Group Aug 12th - share your story. Subject: [of] Re: more birthday wishes to Nancy and the group.

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Who "owns" your organization's culture?

Mark Oehlert

Yep, culture. Often it''s like a specter hanging over failed projects - "the culture wasn''t prepared to accept that technology." We talk about it''s importance and about having the right one and about disruptive ones and innovation ones but I think we need to be a bit more basic up front. . The first thing you need to understand about organizational culture is that you already have one. Want a culture that makes people at all levels feel that they have input?

A cultured gene

Mind Hacks

This new study adds to the more nuanced view of the hormone, which found a ‘reaching out’ effect only in the group of Americans, indicating that culture was affecting how the gene affected behaviour. The OXTR gene exerts its influence against the background of these contrasting cultural conventions. In both cases, the G carriers were more sensitive to the social conventions of their own cultures.

A cultured gene

Mind Hacks

This new study adds to the more nuanced view of the hormone, which found a ‘reaching out’ effect only in the group of Americans, indicating that culture was affecting how the gene affected behaviour. The OXTR gene exerts its influence against the background of these contrasting cultural conventions. In both cases, the G carriers were more sensitive to the social conventions of their own cultures.

The culture of social learning

Jay Cross

Understanding Corporate Twitter , a post from an employee of EMC, got me thinking about the role of corporate culture in implementing the social learning platforms I’ve been calling learnscapes. Social learning platforms are more a reflection of the people who use them, sprinkled with a corporate culture and the ability to make good connections. To find, encourage and enlarge your internal group of proficient “social people&# ?