Building a Culture of Continuous Learning

Charles Jennings

The part that formal, directed learning plays in overall organisational capability may be important at times, but organisations aspiring towards Peter Senge’s ‘learning organization’ – in other words, creating a culture of continuous learning - need to reach beyond simply improving structured training. In a recent webinar I discussed some very interesting data from the Corporate Leadership Council’s ‘Training Effectiveness Dashboard’ study with participants. Most people get it.

Micro-blogging can help build your organisational culture

Dan Pontefract

As a consequence and according to Gallup Management Journal , this disengaged and disconnected culture (in US-based organisations) is costing $300b per year in lost revenues alone. Moving Towards a Culture of Sharing. According to research published by McKinsey and Company in December, 2010, only 13% of companies felt as though micro-blogging was actually enhancing company culture. The encouraging sign, however, is that this sentiment is up from the 2009 data point of 10%.

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Micro-blogging can help build your organisational culture

Dan Pontefract

As a consequence and according to Gallup Management Journal , this disengaged and disconnected culture (in US-based organisations) is costing $300b per year in lost revenues alone. Moving Towards a Culture of Sharing. According to research published by McKinsey and Company in December, 2010, only 13% of companies felt as though micro-blogging was actually enhancing company culture. The encouraging sign, however, is that this sentiment is up from the 2009 data point of 10%.

Artificial Intelligence is Ready for Business; Are Businesses Ready for AI?

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

In the past few years, the necessary ingredients have come together to propel AI beyond the research labs into the marketplace: powerful, inexpensive computer technologies; advanced algorithms and models; and most important, oceans and oceans of data. AI’s dependence on a digital foundation and the fact that it often must be trained on unique data mean that there are no shortcuts for firms. AI is now seemingly everywhere.

Skills and Jobs in the Digital Economy

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

The modern digital revolution - with its hallmarks of computer power, connectivity and data ubiquity - has brought iPhones and the internet.” The paper analyzed the changes between 2006 and 2014 in the skill composition of 674 occupations using the US Government’s O*NET data base, - the most comprehensive data sets of occupational skill requirements. Workflow and collaboration tools improve coordination and knowledge sharing among workers.

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How to Support the Widespread Adoption of AI

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

In our surveys and our work with hundreds of clients, we’ve seen that AI initiatives face formidable cultural and organizational barriers… at most businesses that aren’t born digital, traditional mindsets and ways of working run counter to those needed for AI.”. The advent of PCs in the 1980s then made it possible to apply IT to front-office processes and applications, such as word processing in office systems, spreadsheets in data analysis, and customer support.

Artificial Intelligence is Ready for Business; Are Businesses Ready for AI?

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

In the past few years, the necessary ingredients have come together to propel AI beyond the research labs into the marketplace: powerful, inexpensive computer technologies; advanced algorithms and models; and most important, oceans and oceans of data. AI’s dependence on a digital foundation and the fact that it often must be trained on unique data mean that there are no shortcuts for firms. AI is now seemingly everywhere.

Everyday People Are Heroes: Using Big Data to Engage New Agents of Change Online

Beth Kanter

Note from Beth: I was lucky enough to get an advanced copy of Data Driven Nonprofits by Steve Maclaughlin (launching Sept. 6th so stay tuned) and so data and nonprofits has been on my brain. Everyday People Are Heroes: Using Big Data to Engage New Agents of Change Online Guest Post by Cheryl Contee. The culture of the web has changed. Report to match your email file (of up to 5000 names) with our social data and receive a custom infographic to see your social reach.

Design Thinking and the Workplace Experience

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

As the authors argue, design principles should be applied within the management domain itself, to help rethink business processes, workflows and the overall structure of the organization and thus create what it calls a New Workplace Experience (NWX). They were focused on process and workflow optimization rather than on employee’s journeys and experiences. . Design the employee experiences, not just workflows and tools.

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70:20:10 – Above All Else It’s a Change Agent

Charles Jennings

That’s the key to the 70:20:10 model, and there’s an increasing body of data in support of this. Each organisational culture will display its own profile of workplace, social and structured development opportunities, and each will vary dependent on a number of factors. [1] What we should be doing is putting our effort into supporting and refining learning where it’s already happening, and this is predominantly as part of the daily workflow.

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It’s Only 65% !

Charles Jennings

The numbers are a useful reminder that the majority of learning occurs through experience and practice within the workflow (the ‘70’), through sharing and supporting others, conversations and networks (the ‘20’), and that a smaller amount of overall learning occurs through structured training and development activities (the ‘10’). Many organisations are using the 70:20:10 framework to help create cultures of continuous learning and to to build high performance.

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What is innovation?

Harold Jarche

It sounds easy, but it’s a major cultural change because it questions some common assumptions about work —. It turns out that to develop a ‘cumulative culture’ – technology that constantly ratchets up in complexity and diversity – a species needs to be able to share information very accurately. ” — How Culture Drove Human Evolution. And here at Spigit, we’ve got hundreds of data sets to look through.”.

The Only Person Who Behaves Sensibly Is My Tailor

Charles Jennings

Shaw summed up his views on lifelong learning thus: "What we call education and culture is for the most part nothing but the substitution of reading for experience, of literature for life, of the obsolete fictitious for the contemporary real." However extrapolating the context and outcomes to make any sense of this type of data requires a series of further steps that are orders of magnitude along the path to providing meaningful insight. Some data may be readily available.

Managing Learning?

Charles Jennings

Of course external factors – such as other people (especially your manager and your team), technology, prevailing culture, general ‘environmental’ factors, and a range of different elements – can support, facilitate, encourage, and help your learning occur faster, better, with greater impact and so on. Donald Taylor recently published an article titled ‘ What does ‘LMS’ mean today ?’. In it Donald posited something I’ve been advocating for years. It is this.

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Putting Enterprise 2.0 into Context

Andy McAfee

She makes a brilliant point: Culture will change as a result of the pervasive use of social tools. Lack of cultural change is not social business’s biggest failure. The biggest failure is the lack of workflow integration to drive culture change. Data and decisions (“OK, go ahead and increase the customer’s credit limit so we can ship the order&# ) should be able to flow easily between the systems for formal and informal work.

Working in the dark

Harold Jarche

However, a dysfunctional company culture does not improve with transparency, it just gets exposed. He redesigned an advertising agency’s workflow, identifying the main choke points - four “big meetings” where one of the “owners” had to be present - and then made the workflow visible so anybody could see what was happening. The clients did not go for this, even with the data staring them in the face they continued in their old ways.

The Best of Times, The Worst of Times: opportunities and challenges for the L&D profession

Charles Jennings

When asked about the overall performance of the L&D department, rather than single learning events or interventions, the survey data revealed the following: L&D’S OVERALL PERFORMANCE AND IMPACT IS EXTREMELY POOR 77% of executives and managers rated their L&D department’s overall performance as poor or very poor.

Survey 181

The Need to Adapt to the Speed of Change or Die: lessons for L&D from the retail industry

Charles Jennings

Especially if they can gain that knowledge and expertise more easily and without leaving their desk or workflow. I don’t have the data to prove it, but I have a gut feeling that over time any one of us will build a network of trusted colleagues and advisors that will give us equally, if not better, information and advice for action than any traditional L&D department can do. Yesterday another great British institution slid into the history books.

[berkman] Transforming Scholarly Communication

David Weinberger

He begins by noting the “data deluge.&# But, compuing is stepping up to the problem: Massive data sets, evolution of multicore, and the power of the cloud. We’ll need all that (Lee says) because the workflow for processing all the new info we’re gathering hasn’t kept up with the amount we’re taking in via sensor networks, global databases, laboratory instruments, desktops, etc. collect data and do research, 2.

[preserve] Lightning Talks

David Weinberger

The DCL is built into a Cultural Heritage Informatics track at Simmons. “We’ve come up with some new and interesting ways to think about data.” The LoC’s digital data is on lots of media: 300T on everything from DVDs to DAT tapes and Zip disks. Her group provides a generic workflow for dealing with this stuff — any division, any medium. They have a wheeling cart for getting at this data. They make the data available “as is.”

I Am Not That Guy

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

She writes : I’m always fascinated to see how my work in ed-tech is deemed “emotional” or dismissed as merely “cultural analysis” – gendered descriptions of what I do (subtly, overtly) perhaps. I’m building repositories of data about ed-tech funding. I''ve covered work by Audrey Watters a dozen times or more now and she''s never had a problem with it - at least, none that ever made it into a column about my coverage.

Personal Learning: Taking Ownership of Learning Online: Part One

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

I work very differently and this is important because this research workflow that I have in. So, I'm not referring to traditional learning that is learning based on traditions or cultures, that's not what I need.

Three Principles for Net Work

Harold Jarche

Narration of work is the first step in integrating learning into the workflow. This can be enabled by social media but social media also make the company culture transparent. A dysfunctional company culture does not improve with transparency, it just gets exposed. Work is changing. The nature of work is changing in our increasingly networked economy. What was considered good, dependable work in the 20th century is now getting automated or outsourced.

Idiots, Networks and Patterns

Harold Jarche

Marc Benioff [CEO Salesforce.com]: We learned that the key to success with social collaboration is integrating social into workflow. The Physics of Finance: The more chaotic our environment & less control we have, the more we see non-existent simple patterns , or as Valdis Krebs pointed out, seeing fictitious patterns in random data is called “ apophenia &#. Tweet Here are some interesting things that were shared via Twitter this past week.

LibraryLab funded project librapalooza

David Weinberger

Abigail Bourdeaux: The Copyright and Fair Use Tool: An interactive workflow tool for those trying to determine the copyright status, and fair use status, of materials, particularly for use in the classroom. (It They will spend the fall semester gathering more usage data before going to full implementation; they want to make sure people will actually use it. By having it in similar formats, libraries will be able to compare their data.

Designing and Implementing MOOCs that Maximize Student Learning

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

Some of the data makes this clear In most of the MOOCs Stanford has offered, fewer than half the students have come from North America. They have a more varied educational and cultural background than in traditional courses. There are different workflows. Summary of a presentation by Seth Anderson (Duke), Amy Collier (Stanford), Cassandra Horlii (California Institute of Technology) Amy: What is unique about online learning in MOOCs?

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The Future Business of Learning for Suppliers

Charles Jennings

This is where the data Tony Karrer presented is both interesting and revealing. THE MASIE BAROMETER and CIPD 2009 SURVEY It is useful to look at the Masie Learning Resources Barometer data alongside the UK CIPD data gathered a few months earlier. The correlation between these two sets of data is high. Last month Tony Karrer wrote an very insightful piece on his eLearning Technology blog about the Business of Learning.

I Know It When I See It : Andrew McAfee’s Blog

Andy McAfee

To put some flesh on each of these terms… Freeform means that the technology does not in any meaningful way impose, hardwire, or make and enforce assumptions about - Workflows - Roles - Privileges - Content - Decision right allocations Instead, people come together as equals within the environment created by technology, and do pretty much whatever they want. I’d want that system to have a standard order-to-ship workflow that was very hard to deviate from.

I Know It When I See It

Andy McAfee

To put some flesh on each of these terms… Freeform means that the technology does not in any meaningful way impose, hardwire, or make and enforce assumptions about - Workflows - Roles - Privileges - Content - Decision right allocations Instead, people come together as equals within the environment created by technology, and do pretty much whatever they want. I’d want that system to have a standard order-to-ship workflow that was very hard to deviate from.

Toward a Pattern Language for Enterprise 2.0 : Andrew McAfee’s Blog

Andy McAfee

It is a change of culture. Well, that change of culture cannot occur without establishing the appropriate environment to foster it, including a coordinated set of capabilities, recommendations, influences, and incentives. This is not "workflow" or the world of software applications that your pattern table characterizes under 1.0. Andrew McAfee’s Blog The Business Impact of IT Home Home RSS Search Toward a Pattern Language for Enterprise 2.0

Is craigslist or eHarmony the Right Model for Enterprise 2.0?

Andy McAfee

eHarmony’s approach to connecting people is to first collect a large amount of structured data from them, then have the people themselves sit by while computers and algorithms go to work on this data. And if you have any data on this topic or know of any good research in the area, let us know that as well. { This is largely an unpopular stance in IT organizations that tend to have leadership that skews to the more structured/workflow process types.

e-Clippings (Learning As Art): Reflecting on the e-Learning Guild Annual Gathering

Mark Oehlert

Dont get hung up looking at the 3D virtual world - thats icing - look at what kind of social networking and workflow process support tools are built into it. The new research tool from the Guild (powered by Tableau ) is stunning - while it might not make great theater - turn your data wonks loose on it and stand back.

The Reality of Virtual Learning

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

Because what I know about the world very much depends on my own perception, my own background, my own culture, my own experiences. Another example of this learning is what Jay Cross calls workflow learning or informal learning. That’s what is being evolved, there’s a whole movement on social data portability, and as well (and it’ll come up a little bit later) OpenID, which makes that possible (I’ll mention that a little bit later).