Learning Analytics Courses

George Siemens

After about a year of planning, we can finally announce the following courses on edX focusing on learning analytics. The intent of these courses is to eventually lead into a MicroMasters and then advance placement in an in-development Masters of Science in Learning Analytics at UTA. Each course runs about three weeks and we’ve tried to settle on prominent analytics tools for educational data so the experience is one where skills can immediately be applied.

E-Learning 3.0 Course Synopsis

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

The MOOC environment is designed to support both types of learning. Ideally, course participants will have tools to manage their individual knowledge networks as well as means to interact through social networks. Each person enters the course with their own learning objective.

Course 181

Silly Design

Clark Quinn

Time for a brief rant on interface designs. And, hopefully, we can extract some lessons, because these are just silly design decisions. But there’s one very very silly design decision here. And the 3rd timer, of course, has one. Of course. design

Design 170

Innovation in open online courses

George Siemens

In a few weeks, our edX course Data, Analytics, and Learning (#DALMOOC https://www.edx.org/course/utarlingtonx/utarlingtonx-link5-10x-data-analytics-2186 ) will start. We (Carolyn Rose, Dragan Gasevic, Ryan Baker, and I) have spent the last several months thinking through the course structure and format. This is a short overview of the innovations that we want to explore during the course. DALMOOC has been designed to model a distributed information structure.

Course 209

The game of course

Jay Cross

The largest obstacle holding L&D professionals back from taking advantage of network technologies, distributed networks, social connections, peer interaction, and informal learning may be their bedrock belief that learning = courses. What’s a course? Design Meta-Learning

Course 183

Redesigning Learning Design

Clark Quinn

Of late, a lot of my work has been designing learning design. Helping orgs transition their existing design processes to ones that will actually have an impact. That is, someone’s got a learning design process, but they want to improve it. design strategy

Design 154

Design, value & constraint

Dave Snowden

In Whistler earlier in the year we looked at the wider question of design and moved on in Tasmania to examine design in the context of resilience. In the final retreat of the year we continue the theme of design but this time with a wider focus on value.

Design 172

Designing with science

Clark Quinn

How should we design? Design for How People Learn (Dirksen). Both of these, of course, aren’t as comprehensive as a book. Of course, it may be that in the process of just designing both that you have some insight. design strategy

Design 188

Cognitive Edge announces training courses for 2016 – SenseMaker® courses

Dave Snowden

As we head into the Northern Summer/Southern Winter (delete as applicable), we’re announcing our timetable of new courses for the second half of 2016. Yesterday we announced three more Cynefin and Sense-Making courses with Dave Snowden. Course 3: Online SenseMaker® Signification Design.

Course 130

Online Learning Course Design

Tony Karrer

The Work Literacy online learning course is over and Michele Martin - Deconstructing the Work Literacy Learning Event and Harold Jarche - Post Work Literacy have posted their thoughts around the event. Here are some thoughts on the course and the implications for design of similar kinds of online learning courses. Social Network as Course Platform Like social networks generally, Ning, unfortunately feels a bit scattered.

Course 100

Designing a game

Clark Quinn

He knew that I had designed games before returning to grad school, and had subsequently done one on my thesis research. I taught my interface design students HyperCard, to have a simple language to prototype in. And, of course, you had to discover the chains. design games

Design 168

From Courses to Campaigns : using the 70:20:10 approach

Charles Jennings

One of the major strategic objectives for many HR and L&D departments in 2016 and beyond will be to extend their focus and services beyond courses and out into the workplace. Courses may help with the basics, or to refresh our knowledge, but courses alone won’t deliver high performance.

Course 219

A Crash Course in Design Thinking for Network Leadership Skills

Beth Kanter

Last month, I participated in a Design Thinking Lab with network leadership practitioners convened by the Leadership Learning Community. The session was an introduction to design thinking methods and to generate ideas for instructional modules for networked leadership development.

Tools and Design

Clark Quinn

I’ve often complained about how the tools we have make it easy to do bad design. Authoring tools, in general, are oriented on a ‘page’ metaphor; they’re designed to provide a sequence of pages. The challenge isn’t inherent in the tool design.

Design 161

Researching open online courses

George Siemens

In fall, we (TEKRI, NRC, UPEI and possibly a few other organizations) are hosting an open online course. The course will run for about 35 weeks and credit options will be available for students in the Athabasca University MDE program and with Georgia Tech. It’s fairly easy to take online courses or interact with your favorite academic these days. Since 2007, numerous people have offered some version of open online courses.

Course 164

Direct Instruction and Learning Experience Design

Clark Quinn

Ultimately, of course, it expanded my understanding, which is always my desire. So it’s time to think a bit deeper about Direct Instruction and Learning Experience Design. And of course I am not surprised to see the importance of feedback.

Design 166

The Quinnov 8: An online course

Clark Quinn

Ok, so I told you the story of the video course I was creating on what I call the Quinnov 8, and now I’ll point to it. I can’t control it, but as I mention in the course, you want to space it out. The content is organized around what I’m terming the Quinnov 8, the eight elements I think are core to making the step to better elearning design. The elements are: Performance consulting: what to do before you decide to course. design

Course 126

Designing outside your comfort zone

Adaptive Path

That’s what we tell ourselves because as designers we often rely on tried and tested tools, methods and standards to help us arrive at a solution that should work. They may sound like best practices for just being a good designer, and they are. “Trust the process!”.

Design 206

Is Design Thinking the “New Liberal Arts”?

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Design thinking has become an increasingly popular topic of discussion over the past decade. Design is no longer just for physical objects, e.g. cars, bridges, shoes, jewelry, smartphones. The application of design thinking beyond products isn’t new.

Design 278

Learning Design Insights

Clark Quinn

I attended a recent Meetup of the Bay Area Learning Design & Technology, and it led to some insights. I was tapped to host the Learning Design conversation (there were three others: LMS, Measurement, and Social Learning), and that meant that a subset of the group sat in on the discussion.

Design 183

The 'Course' in MOOC

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

Given the opportunity, these learners have a burning desire to 'complete' the course. Well-designed and smartly-delivered" MOOCs with a valid, transferable certificate of completion (learning experience) may be 1 viable solution. In this sense, the concept of course completion doesn't really make sense - what is it to 'complete' joining a community? Here's why the C in MOOC continues to stand for 'Course'. Today, of course, they're not necessarily lectures any more.

Course 189

Rethinking Design: Curriculum

Clark Quinn

The goal is to choose tasks, with the final task likely being chosen first and working backwards (as in Understanding By Design ) to determine what needs to be done. design

Design 274

Thoughts on Learning Design Strategy

Clark Quinn

At the DevLearn conference, I ran a Morning Buzz on Learning Design Strategy. I started with a set of questions to address, so I’ll go through their comments in roughly that order (though we didn’t exactly follow this structure): What is learning design strategy?

udemy Course with Marissa Mayer

Jay Cross

CEO Marissa Mayer, win $1,000 for your best design, and learn how a student just like you is succeeding with what she learned on Udemy. Marissa’s free Udemy course will teach you how to build a culture of innovation at your company. Take This FREE Course.

Course 169

Evil design?

Clark Quinn

Of course, it started, and then said “finishing” For 5 days! First, this is bad design. The post Evil design? design strategy technologyThis is a rant, but it’s coupled with lessons. . I’ve been away, and one side effect was a lack of internet bandwidth at the residence. In the first day I’d used up a fifth of the allocation for the whole time (> 5 days)!

Design 121

Resources before courses

Clark Quinn

In the course of answering a question in an interview, I realized a third quip to complement two recent ones. While I’ve previously argued that good learning design shouldn’t take longer, that was assuming good design in the first place: that you did an analysis, and concept and example design and presentation, and practice, not just dumping a quiz on top of content. However, doing real design, good or bad, should take time.

Bad Course on Instructional Design

Tony Karrer

I just posted about eLearning Design and Development Training Course listing two examples of courses that talked about instructional design for eLearning. The course from MyUdutu ( [link] ) may talk about it, but it is a classic example of what not to do in eLearning. So while it talks about Instructional Design - it hardly is something to review. Later in the course, they used narration much better with a graphic.

Course 100

Refining Designing

Clark Quinn

A couple of months ago, I posted on thinking about designing, calling for designing ‘backwards and forwards’ And it’s continued to percolate, rightly or wrongly. It occurred to me that when you design your resource(s), that has to happen first. design

Design 174

Creating the Connectivist Course

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

So the form was not something we designed and implemented, at least, not explicitly so. One was the beginning of open online courses. We had both seen them in operation in the past, and had most recently been influenced by Alec Couros’s online graduate course and David Wiley’s wiki-based course. What made these courses important was that they invoked the idea of including outsiders into university courses in some way.

Course 150

Rethinking Design: Pedagogy

Clark Quinn

In thinking through how to design courses that lead to both engaging experiences and meaningful outcomes, I’ve been working on the component activities. design

Design 200

eLearning Design and Development Training Course

Tony Karrer

Someone on LinkedIn asked: Can anyone recommend a really good e-learning design/development training course? This is for a colleague who is new to instructional design & development so something that covers the basics at an introductory level would be best. link] RPI An introduction to instructional design and course development and guidance on selecting the right design and development tools.

Course 100

Adaptive or just good design?

Clark Quinn

And, of course, it occurred to me after a conversation that there might be another example of this ‘tech fix before smart fix’ problem: adaptive learning over good design. adapting on learner performance), and, of course, some are pretty silly (e.g. But I would posit that before you charge off for adaptive learning, you make sure you’re doing good learning design first. Yet, at core, they too need good design. design games strategy

Design 138

Designing Backward and Forward

Clark Quinn

So I began thinking about performance experience design as a way to keep us focused on designing solutions to performance needs in the organization. From there, we can design forward to create those resources, or make them accessible (e.g. design meta-learning

Design 224

Announcing the first SenseMaker®-specific courses - sign up now!

Dave Snowden

As a friend of Cognitive Edge, you may have attended courses, read the blogs and used the techniques - but wondered about how to take the next step to actual implementation of SenseMaker® with clients or in-house. These new courses are for anyone who has heard about SenseMaker® but needed more detailed knowledge and practical examples before they actually run one. The first courses therefore are: An Introduction to Running SenseMaker® Projects.

Course 148

Course completion rates in online programs

George Siemens

For example, at Athabasca University, our course completion rates are high. From the draft report: As was the case in previous years, 85% of courses started by undergraduate students were successfully completed (the other 15% withdrew or failed; graduate and “non-starter” registrations were excluded). Online courses that I’ve taught through University of Manitoba have similar high success rates. Online programs are frequently criticized for high drop out rates.

Course 157

Egoless design

Clark Quinn

A number of years ago I wrote a series on design heuristics that emerged by looking at our cognitive limitations and practices from other field. One of the practices I covered briefly in one of the posts was egoless design, and a recent conversation reminded me of it. The context for this is talking about how to improve our designs. This applies to instructional design as well. One of the things we could, and should do, is design reviews. design social strateg

Design 121

Levels of Design

Clark Quinn

Kirkpatrick is widely (not widely enough, and wrongly) used as an evaluation tool, but he talked about using it as a design tool, and that perspective made clear for me a problem with our approaches. The point, and this is emphasized by the ‘design’ perspective, is that you are supposed to start with level 4, and work back. Using it as a design tool, however, would emphasize the point. And, of course, to better learning design overall. design strategy

Design 142

Design thinking & complexity pt 3

Dave Snowden

I argued by implication that traditional design thinking prematurely converges on a requirement with is then throw over the wall the creatives to ideate a solution. The picture below is one I have used a lot and it's a part of the above mentioned course.

Cognitive Edge announces training courses for 2016 – Working with Complex Problems

Dave Snowden

As we head into the Northern Summer/Southern Winter (delete as applicable), we’re announcing our timetable of new courses for the second half of 2016. Today we’re announcing practitioner-focused courses on complexity and the Cynefin framework. Course 1: Dealing with Complex Problems.

Designing E-Learning 3.0 in gRSShopper - 5

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

We launched the course this week and I did a bunch of things to get ready. First, a media summary view: Figure 63 - media_summary view in the Vide Editor Next, the Course Videos page newly created in the Page Editor.

Design 176

Designing E-Learning 3.0 in gRSShopper - 1

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

For example, instead of creating a course simply by filling in boxes in predefined forms, I can think about the structure and format ahead of time and design it exactly how I want. For example, at the top of the table are fields for 'course' and 'instance'.Any

Design 168

Designing E-Learning 3.0 in gRSShopper - 2

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

In the previous segment I decided to create a course with modules and sections, and set up the modules. But it's also true that nobody wants to use the course calendar. People have their own calendars, and the course calendar has to work with those.

Design 176

Instructional Design Orthodoxy

Xyleme

I will be dating myself here, but so much of the orthodoxy in the instructional design process was forged back in the late 80’s and early 90’s when the only Computer-Based Training (CBT) tools were Toolbook for the PC, and Hypercard for the Mac. The idea that you might allow scrolling was to many an Instruction Designer taboo. In my blog posts, I’ve been challenging instructional designers to embrace cultural shifts, and evolving technologies rather than brace against them.

Design 208