Content systems not content packages

Clark Quinn

In a conversation last week (ok, an engagement), the topic of content systems came up. For one, separate content from how it’s delivered. And, pull content together by rules, not hardwired. This is in opposition to the notion of pre-packaged content.

Content Confusion

Clark Quinn

I read, again and again, about the importance of ‘content’ in learning. Just what do mean by ‘content’? For one, I get concerned that talking about content foregrounds ‘information’ And that’s a problem. At least as designers.

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Content engineering

Clark Quinn

We’ve heard about learning engineering and while the focus is on experience design, the pragmatics include designing content to create the context, resources, and motivation for the activity. And it’s time we step beyond just hardwiring this content together, and start treating it as professionals. You can customize the content you’re searching for with filters. The content reacts to the device you’re on and displays appropriately.

Redesigning Learning Design

Clark Quinn

Of late, a lot of my work has been designing learning design. Helping orgs transition their existing design processes to ones that will actually have an impact. That is, someone’s got a learning design process, but they want to improve it. design strategy

Design 179

Looking forward on content

Clark Quinn

At DevLearn next week, I’ll be talking about content systems in session 109. The point is that instead of monolithic content, we want to start getting more granular for more flexible delivery. design technology

Intelligent Content

Clark Quinn

I’ve been on the content rant before , talking about the need to structure content into models , and the benefits of tagging. You have to understand that folks who do content as if their business depended on it, e.g. web marketers, have a level of sophistication that elearning (and all elearning: performance support, social, etc) would do well to adopt. One of the people I follow is Scott Abel, the Content Wrangler. design strategy technology

Content/Practice Ratio?

Clark Quinn

So, I’d roughly (and generously) estimate that the ratio is around 80:20 for content: practice. So, two questions: do we just need more practice, or do we also have too much content. Yes, designing practice is harder than just delivering content, but it’s not that much harder to develop more than just to develop some. However, I’ll argue we’re also delivering too much content. And then let the practice drive them to the content.

Figuring Out Content Strategy

Adaptive Path

The biggest change in my understanding of design after joining Capital One, by far, is how I understand the importance and nature of content strategy in my design work. Design Research. First, I defined each chunk of content that we needed. Content Themes and Voice.

Tools and Design

Clark Quinn

I’ve often complained about how the tools we have make it easy to do bad design. Authoring tools, in general, are oriented on a ‘page’ metaphor; they’re designed to provide a sequence of pages. The challenge isn’t inherent in the tool design.

Design 161

Rethinking Design: Curriculum

Clark Quinn

The notion is that we need to redefine curriculum as a way to get away from a content base, and start moving to an activity base. The goal is to have them process the content in service of accomplishing the task, an approach more consonant with our cognitive architecture. design

Design 280

From Content to Experience

Clark Quinn

A number of years ago, I said that the problem for publishers was not going from text to content (as the saying goes), but from content to experience. I think elearning designers have the same problem: they are given a knowledge dump, and have to somehow transform that into an effective experience. What’s a designer to do? And is this content aligned to that skill? So, create experiences, not content. design strategy

Content or experience

Clark Quinn

I continue to have a problem with the term content as a component of what our field does. What we do is create content. Even in F2F training, we have content and structure around actions we ask our learners to take. At the end of the day, much of what we’re working on is content that is communicated or triggered by learner actions. I believe we need to focus on the activity , not on the content. design strategy

Rethinking Design: Pedagogy

Clark Quinn

In thinking through how to design courses that lead to both engaging experiences and meaningful outcomes, I’ve been working on the component activities. So for conceptual tasks, what we’re looking to do is drive learning to content. design

Design 224

How to Create a Content Strategy that Resonates with the Modern Learner

Xyleme

Solutions Consultant, Mike Buoy , and Jennifer Rogers , Head of Learning at Anglo American, discussed how learning leaders need to rethink how to create, manage, and deliver content to meet the needs of the modern workforce. In this webinar, Xyleme Sr.

Designing Learning Like Professionals

Clark Quinn

I’m increasingly realizing that the ways we design and develop content are part of the reason why we’re not getting the respect we deserve. We need to start combining experience design with learning engineering to really start delivering solutions. To truly design learning, we need to understand learning science. The point I’m trying to make is that we have to stop treating designing learning as something anyone can do.

Design 179

Learning without Design

Jane Hart

Most workplace learning is based on the concept that learning has to be designed; in fact that people won’t be able to learn something unless it has been structured into a logical sequence, developed professionally and delivered to them in some authoritative way.

Design 221

Design like a pro

Clark Quinn

And yet, if you’re going to be a learning designer or engineer , you should know the science and be using it. You could read Julie Dirksen’s Design for How People Learn as a very good interpretation of the science. Yet, somehow, we see elearning tools like ‘click to learn more’ (er, less ), tarted up quiz show templates to drill knowledge, easy ways to take content and add quizzes to them, and more. design

Design 193

Designing Backward and Forward

Clark Quinn

So I began thinking about performance experience design as a way to keep us focused on designing solutions to performance needs in the organization. From there, we can design forward to create those resources, or make them accessible (e.g. design meta-learning

Design 236

Reimagined Learning: Content & Portfolio elaborated

Clark Quinn

In a previous post I laid out the initial framework for rethinking learning design, and in a subsequent post I elaborated the activity component. Two additional components of the model around the activities were content and then products coupled with reflection.

From instructor to designer & facilitator

Clark Quinn

While I posted an answer there, I thought I’d post it here too: I see two major roles in that of the ‘teacher’: the designer of learning experiences (pre), and the facilitator of same (during/post). I think the design changes by returning to natural learning approaches, an apprenticeship model (c.f. Tech can make it easier to follow such a design paradigm. Ideally we have content and check, as well as any preliminary experiences, done in a ‘flipped model’.

Design 136

How to Design eLearning Content that Improves the User Experience

TOPYX LMS

As a training and development manager, designing eLearning content that improves the user experience is a crucial component of maximizing training effectiveness.

Content as Icebergs

Doc Searls

In Snow on the Water I wrote about the ‘low threshold of death” for what media folks call “content” — which always seemed to me like another word for packing material. Twenty-five straight minutes of content!” So I think about content death a lot. Back around the turn of the millennium, John Perry Barlow said “I didn’t start hearing the word ‘content’ until the container business felt threatened.”

[siu] Accessing content

David Weinberger

Alex Hodgson of ReadCube is leading a panel called “Accessing Content: New Thinking and New Business Models or Accessing Research Literature” at the Shaking It Up conference. You import your pdfs, read them with their enhanced reader, and can annotate them and discover new content. “What does content want to be?” JSTOR has 150M content accesses per year, 9,000 institutions, 2,000 archival journals, 27,000 books.

What do the 24 #C2Xmas resources tell us about how to design modern content and learning experiences?

Jane Hart

So what do these 24 resources tell us about how to design content and learning experiences for the modern workplace? Here they are in one list – with my thoughts about what each one tells us about content and learning experience design. Learn Free Magic Tricks – content has to be contextually relevant though. Daily Lit – keep the daily content short and digestible. Leonardo’s Notebook – keep the content as flexible as possible.

Will Content Blocking push Apple into advertising’s wheat business?

Doc Searls

The company is also taking sides against both — especially adtech — by supporting Content Blocking in a new breed of mobile phone apps we can expect to see in iOS 9 , Apple’s next mobile operating system, due next month. In Apple’s Content Blocking is chemo for the cancer of adtech , which I posted a few days ago, I visited the likely effects of content blocking. Yet Content Blocking should stop iAd ads as dead as all the rest, one would assume.

Content as a Service

Xyleme

For better or worse, the development of learning content has been a one-way push process. As instructional designers, we create our learning products, package them up with all the content and media, wish them well, and ship them off to the LMS’s – never to be seen again. Once gone, we lose all connection and control of our content – and this has some obvious drawbacks: Content is replicated to each LMS. There is no way to monetize the content.

Webinar: Is Your Content Keeping Up with the Learning Experience?

Xyleme

However, the majority of the focus has been on the delivery platform and not on the key ingredient — content. As companies work to develop sustainable, long-term content strategies, it’s important to note that most learning content is being created in-house. This means organizations need to have agile solutions that make it quick and easy for almost anyone to create, manage and distribute content (not just instructional designers).

Transcending Experience Design

Clark Quinn

Last week’s #lrnchat touched on an important topic, experience design. The one I want to pursue here is the notion of transformative experience design. The point here is not to tout the book, but instead to tout that a meld of experience design and learning design, learning experience design, is the path to this end. There are things about experience design that instructional design largely ignores: emotion, multiple senses, extended engagement.

Design 158

Webinar Recording Link: Is Your Content Keeping Up with the Learning Experience?

Xyleme

Ready to learn more about Xyleme’s industry-leading Learning Content Management System (LCMS)? Contact us today to find out how Xyleme can help your organization unlock the power of your content.

Instructional Design Orthodoxy

Xyleme

I will be dating myself here, but so much of the orthodoxy in the instructional design process was forged back in the late 80’s and early 90’s when the only Computer-Based Training (CBT) tools were Toolbook for the PC, and Hypercard for the Mac. Back then, the metaphor was a deck of cards and each card was a 640×480 screen’s worth of content. The idea that you might allow scrolling was to many an Instruction Designer taboo. Instructional Design

Design 208

Notes from Intelligent Content 2010

Xyleme

Home > Instructional Design , Learning Content Management > Notes from Intelligent Content 2010 Notes from Intelligent Content 2010 March 11th, 2010 Goto comments Leave a comment A couple of weeks ago, Xyleme presented at Intelligent Content conference hosted by the Rockley Group.

Designing Higher Learning

Clark Quinn

Consequently, they worry very much about having the right content. Even if they’re buying content from publishers, they are focused on content, not experience. Even if you have an instructional designer in the equation, the likelihood that they’re knowledgeable enough and confident enough to work with SMEs to get the real outcomes/objectives is slim. design meta-learning strategy

Design 140

Webinar Recording: Is Your Content Keeping Up with the Learning Experience?

Xyleme

The post Webinar Recording: Is Your Content Keeping Up with the Learning Experience?

Don’t be Complacent and Content

Clark Quinn

While it’s a vendor-driven show, there were several valuable presentations and information to help get clearer about designing content. So DITA is Darwin Information Typing Architecture, and what it is about is structuring content a bit.

Organization Design

Jay Cross

Those of us who work in the field of learning are accustomed to dealing with managers who think that learning’s solely a matter of herding people into a room to listen to an authority spout content. You can re-design an organization for more optimal outcomes.

Designing E-Learning 3.0 in gRSShopper - 13

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

The Reader To access the reader now, I open the PLE page, which looks like this when it starts (the contents are defined in a box called 'Start' and opens in the 'Reader' tab. The display of the harvested Link content is defined with a view, link_viewer. modal-content').load('[link]

Design 172

Content Curation Primer

Beth Kanter

What is Content Curation? Content curation is the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme. Content curators have integrated this skill into their daily routine. Content

Guided Social Learning Experience Design (Online Workshop)

Jane Hart

Online workshop runs 18 August – 12 September Most e-learning design is about gathering a comprehensive set of material, storyboarding the content, developing screens of information and adding in interactivity and quizzes to test understanding.

Designing E-Learning 3.0 in gRSShopper - 5

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

Step 2 Contents work just the same. The other major content I want to include in the newsletter are posts written by course participants. And I published it manually now, just in case. :) Since I'm using page_header the newsletter will include the course contents menu.

Design 186

A jot of design

Clark Quinn

First, it was an iPad app supporting design. Given that I’m very much about improving design, *and* quite into mobile, this was of interest. Second, I mistakenly thought it came from Michael Allen’s company Allen Interactions, and he’s not only been an early advocate of engaging design, but also he’s a supremely nice guy to complement his smarts. design mobileOrdinarily, I don’t even look at vendor products when offered free trials.

Design 159

Designing E-Learning 3.0 in gRSShopper - 2

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

I'll fill out the actual content of those modules over time. This is where I define the content of the page to be displayed to the reader. In the previous segment I decided to create a course with modules and sections, and set up the modules.

Design 188

Five Steps to Making Your Content Mobile Ready

Xyleme

To date, however, according to Bersin by Deloitte, only 12% of learning content is mobile-enabled. Sales-type employees require mobile learning for different types of quick content consumption. Chunking some existing content into bite-sized nuggets.

ID - Instructional Design or Interactivity Design in an interconnected world?

Charles Jennings

Instructional design is not only seen as a core competency for learning and development/training specialists, but it’s a huge industry, too. Most learning vendors tout their ‘expertise in instructional design’ as a key reason as to why we should engage them to produce learning content.

Design 246