From Social Learning to Workforce Collaboration

Jane Hart

Eagle-eyed readers will have noticed that I’ve changed this blog’s title from “Learning in the Social Workplace” to “Workforce Collaboration” Why? Well, to try and avoid the “learning” word or at least the term “social learning”! In my own consultancy practices I offer workforce collaboration services to a range of businesses – both large and small. Collaboration Social learning

Do you really need separate social learning tools? PART TWO – 6 ways to integrate learning into the workflow

Jane Hart

In Part One of this series of blog postings, I asked the question: “As business is becoming more social and we are using new social tools to work collaboratively with one another, do we really need another set of social tools specifically for learning?” ” In this post I am going to be taking a look at 6 ways organisations are already integrating learning into their workflow systems – so that the same… Read the rest.

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working collaboratively and learning cooperatively

Harold Jarche

Learning and development (L&D) practices reflect this priority on error reduction.But knowledge work, especially creative work, is not mere production. Visualize the workflow of a physical job: produce, produce, produce, produce, produce, produce, produce, produce, produce. Now visualize the workflow of a creative knowledge worker: nothing, nothing, nothing, nothing, flash of brilliance, nothing, nothing, nothing.” —Jay Collaboration + Cooperation.

10 things to remember about social learning (and the use of social media for learning)

Jane Hart

Yesterday I listened into the #lscon Twitter stream for Learning Solutions conference in Orlando, Florida. There was some discussion about social learning, so I tweeted a few thoughts myself. Social learning is not what you make people do (as in training) – but something that happens naturally and spontaneously every day – at work as well as at home. Social learning is the lifeblood of all businesses. Social learning

Five Myths of Social Learning

Xyleme

Home > Social Learning > Five Myths of Social Learning Five Myths of Social Learning December 3rd, 2009 Goto comments Leave a comment There is no question that the rise of social networks is creating a profound shift in the way training departments are delivering knowledge to their employees, partners, and customers. Social learning is disruptive and training organizations need to evolve or die, there is no disputing this.

Why your Enterprise Social Network is your most valuable social learning platform

Jane Hart

This is the article I wrote for the January edition of Inside Learning Technologies magazine. It is an extract from my recent book, Modern Workplace Learning: A resource guide for L&D. In the workplace, social learning comes through social collaboration. Social learning is a natural everyday phenomenon; simply put, we learn from our colleagues as we work with them. Social learning

Using a collaborative platform for brilliant learning

Jane Hart

That’s the topic of my webinar at the Online Learning & Skills Conference that will take place on Thursday 28 June from 1 pm – 1.45 Present an overview of the key social features of social collaboration platforms. Demonstrate a number of examples of social activities she has set up. Propose a lite approach to designing social (learning) activities. Show how learning can be embedded in the workflow. >

Social Learning is NOT a new training trend

Jane Hart

I’ve written a few postings recently (notably Social Learning doesn’t mean what you think it does ) where I have tried to show how the fundamental changes in how businesses are operating, require a fundamental change in how the L&D function needs to view workplace learning. I suggested this means a move from a “Command and Control” approach to an “Encourage and Engage” approach to Workplace Learning. Traditional workplace learning.

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Social Learning doesn’t mean what you think it does!

Jane Hart

A few days ago my Internet Time Alliance colleague, Harold Jarche, shared this article, written by Deb Lavoy, with me: Social Business Doesn’t Mean What You Think It Does, Neither Does Enterprise 2.0. Social Business” is not about technology, or about “corporate culture.” Learning and self-expression are exploding. The changes we are seeing in Workplace Learning are of course just one part of the changes we are seeing in businesses as whole.

Identifying a collaboration platform

Harold Jarche

It may be that you want to retain it in some cut-down form, or it may be that it is providing no real value at all, and it is a barrier to “learning&#. Step Two, or a concurrent step, would be to look at how to enhance collaboration. First of all, collaborative work tools must be simple to be effective. A collaboration platform that is over-engineered would be counterproductive. Does it enhance serendipitous learning?

Workforce collaboration in the network era

Harold Jarche

From a learning perspective, this is what connectivism is about: knowledge exists within systems which are accessed through people participating in activities. This is social. Social media are merely a conduit for collaboration. Social learning is an enabler. By sharing experiences (learning socially), trust emerges. A trusting workplace is a learning workplace and one that can adapt faster to change. Learn or die.

Introducing Share&Learn

Jane Hart

Tweet I recently launched Share&Learn – a new collaboration platform where members can share links, resources, ideas, experiences, tips, etc about the use of learning and performance trends, technologies and tools, in order to learn from one another – both informally and formally. What makes Share&Learn different? How would the Share&Learn platform work in a business? This way formal learning takes place in the workflow.

Workforce Development Services: A new framework of training and learning support

Jane Hart

In my last blog post, From Social Learning to Workforce Collaboration , I talked about how I have been helping organisations support workforce collaboration. Following that post Dan Pontefract asked me this question: “Is this something that helps an external consultant, like yourself and ITA more so than it does those working inside an organization in a traditional ‘learning’ team?” Collaboration Social learning

Social as a Weapon of Class Destruction

Dan Pontefract

The aforementioned line is recognized as the first known use of the term ‘weapons of mass destruction’ But today, in 2013, I want to discuss a new weapon — a weapon of class destruction — and that weapon is social. Let’s first define what I mean by ‘class’ I’d like the term class in my social as a weapon of class destruction thesis to denote two things for purposes of this piece: societal & organizational status.

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Standalone LMS is Still Dead (rebutting & agreeing w/ Dave Wilkins)

Dan Pontefract

Last week, Dave Wilkins of Learn.com wrote a piece entitled “ A Defense of the LMS (and a case for the future of social learning) ”. My in-person and virtual interactions with him have been nothing less than stimulating, social and cerebral. Formal learning needs to blend with any informal and social learning output in the new world. (ie. Informal or social learning needs to blend with formal learning.

A new framework for supporting learning and performance in the social workplace

Jane Hart

Social tools are changing not only the way that professionals are working and learning but also the way that organisations are transforming into social businesses. In the new connected workplace, current training, e-learning or blended learning services, which take a top-down, ”command and control” approach to organising and managing “learning” will not be appropriate to support these new ways of working and learning. Social learning

Why You Must Define the So-What of Learning

Dan Pontefract

Whether you work for a private family-owned business, a publicly traded corporation or in the kindergarten-to-higher-education continuum somewhere, you’re going to have to define learning – whether it’s for your employees, colleagues or students. So let’s examine the “so what” learning definition – meaning why learning is present in organizations. In my opinion, learning is part formal, informal and social. social learning Culture social

Survey: Are you ready, willing and able to support learning in the new social workplace?

Jane Hart

Some time ago I wrote a blog post about how I believed that as social businesses emerge, and new social and collaboration platforms (or social intranets) are introduced into enterprises, L&D will have an extended role in the organisation in order to support the new community and collaboration skills that will be required to underpin a successul social business initiative. (In Social learning

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From “learning technologies” to “social technologies”

Jane Hart

Social technologies now play a big part in everything we do, and it is quite clear that many knowledge workers use a variety of social tools and networks not only to help them get work done, but also to learn efficiently while on the job. We also know that this informal, social learning accounts for 80% or more of how people learn in the workplace, so it is not something to be dismissed as irrelevant or trivial. Social learning

Supporting self-managed team learning in the organisation

Jane Hart

This is a post in a series that I am writing about how the future role of L&D is moving from “packaging learning” to “scaffolding learning”. In the first post I explained that “packaging learning” involves organizing and wrapping up everything an individual needs to learn in a neat parcel, delivering it to them on a plate, and making sure they do it, whilst “scaffolding” is about supporting learning in many other less top-down organized ways.

The differences between learning in an e-business and learning in a social business

Jane Hart

In my recent webinar I shared a slide that showed the 5 stages of workplace learning. This has attracted a lot of interest, and I’ve been asked to talk more about the differences between “learning” in Stages 1-4 and Stage 5. Working and learning in Stages 1-4 is based upon a Taylorist , industrial age mindset. Similarly e-learning was also about automating traditional training practices. So whilst e-business is about automation, social business is about innovation.

Towards the Connected L&D Department

Jane Hart

In my previous post I shared a chart I have been using to demonstrate what it means for the L&D function to move from a “packaging” role to one that helps to support and “scaffold” learning in the flow of daily work. Firstly, the red area is the traditional L&D operating area – designing, delivering and managing instruction (ie face-to-face training and e-learning). Social learning

Supporting the Social Workplace Learning Continuum

Jane Hart

In my previous blog post I explained how I recognized it is difficult for a lot of organisations to support informal and social learning in their organisations, because they are unable to jump the two mindset hurdles of (a) thinking that learning only happens in training courses, and (b) that all organisational learning needs to be controlled by Training/L&D departments. Social learning

Through the Workscape Looking Glass

Jay Cross

Learning Ecosystem, Learning Ecology, and Learnscape mean the same thing as Workscape. I don’t use the word learn with executives, who inevitably think back to the awfulness of school and close their ears. In the same vein, I talk about Working Smarter instead of informal learning, social learning, and so forth. Some people denigrate informal learning but nobody’s against Working Smarter. However, compliance is not learning. Action learning.

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Four Ways User-Generated Content (UGC) Can Make its Way into.

Xyleme

Home > Learning Content Management , Social Learning > Four Ways User-Generated Content (UGC) Can Make its Way into Formal Learning Four Ways User-Generated Content (UGC) Can Make its Way into Formal Learning January 20th, 2010 Goto comments Leave a comment This past week, I’ve been reading and referring to Jane Hart’s article The State of Social Learning Today and some Thoughts for the Future of L&D in 2010 quite a bit.

Micro-blogging can help build your organisational culture

Dan Pontefract

Flash ahead in time to 2006 and the concept of IRC and person-to-person texting was significantly enhanced by Odeo Company General Manager Evan Williams and programmer Jack Dorsi of the United States, to become an open, internet-based, 140 character messaging, collaboration and status update service we now know as Twitter. Increasing social status of employees in business related matters. Weak chance of disrupting already established workflows.

a decade of digital transformation

Harold Jarche

With a focus on improving collaboration, sensemaking, and knowledge sharing in teams, communities and networks, I have had the privilege of working with a wide variety of clients. Carlsberg added PKM and social learning to their year-long global leadership program.

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Micro-blogging can help build your organisational culture

Dan Pontefract

Flash ahead in time to 2006 and the concept of IRC and person-to-person texting was significantly enhanced by Odeo Company General Manager Evan Williams and programmer Jack Dorsi of the United States, to become an open, internet-based, 140 character messaging, collaboration and status update service we now know as Twitter. Increasing social status of employees in business related matters. Weak chance of disrupting already established workflows.

making time for learning

Harold Jarche

For over a decade I have promoted the idea that work is learning & learning is the work. It seems the idea has now gone mainstream, as it’s even noted in Forbes that, “Work and learning will become analogous” It is much easier to just say that workflow learning is essential rather than putting in the structures and practices that can enable it. Social and informal learning are key to increasing insights that can drive innovation.

Dear C-Suite: We Don’t Do Training Anymore

Dan Pontefract

million customers and over $38 billion in assets – delivered a speech where he waxed lyrical about being a social CEO. Early on in the talk, Peter said, “I believe we are at the confluence of two revolutions – a social revolution and a technology revolution.” But it is my argument learning professionals must help the C-Suite understand that training is merely an event and that learning must now be defined as a connected, collaborative and continuous process.

The Holy Trinity: Leadership Framework, Learning 2.0 & Enterprise 2.0

Dan Pontefract

The traditional ‘learning’ folks are trying to sort out how to revolutionize the industry by augmenting their formal learning strategies to incorporate social media, social learning, social networking and the like. Also good to see, but at times I see these folks in other companies plodding along without involvement of the Learning side of the house, or the technology outfits. collaboration technologies and platforms. learning 2.0

Re-thinking Workplace Learning: extracting rather than adding

Charles Jennings

One clear finding presented was that: “t hose activities that are integrated into manager and employee workflow have the largest impact on employee performance, while those that are distinct events separate from the day-to-day job have less impact.” In other words if people have the opportunity to learn and develop as part of their work and they are supported by their manager, then learning will be much better transformed into measurable behavioural change and performance improvement.

Autonomy and Value in Social and Workplace Learning

Charles Jennings

It shows the relationship between relative value and relative autonomy as they relate to different approaches to learning in the modern workplace. Learning in the Modern Workplace’ Model Jane’s diagram shows the increasing value that can be released through exploiting learning opportunities beyond ‘the course’ – or the curriculum. 70:20:10 Model The 70:20:10 model is used to extend learning into the workflow.

LMS vs. LCMS

Xyleme

The Learning and Development industry, like any other, has been inundated with new technologies and tools for learning. Buzz words in the industry include e-learning, mobile learning, cloud delivery, bite-sized learning, informal learning, learning record store, and single-source content development. Another important learning tool that some may not be familiar with is a Learning Content Management System (LCMS). Learning Paths. ?. ?.

LMS vs. LCMS

Xyleme

While sometimes thought to be interchangeable terms, LMS (Learning Management System) and LCMS (Learning Content Management System) platforms share a few functionalities, but couldn’t be more different. A Learning Management System (LMS) is a software application that allows a company, school, or organization to administer, document, track, and report on the delivery of educational courses and training programs. Assigned learning. Individualized learning plan.

Start with the 70. Plan for the 100.

Charles Jennings

Checklists to rate your own organisation’s ability to deliver the critical tasks supporting 70:20:10 Nine ‘cameos’ written by leading thinkers and practitioners including Dennis Mankin (Platinum Performance), Nigel Harrison (Performance Consulting), Clark Quinn (Quinnovation), Jane Hart (Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies), Bob Mosher (APPLY Synergies), Jack Tabak (Chief Learning Officer, Royal Dutch Shell), Jane Bozarth (US Government) and others.

Vendor-neutral

Harold Jarche

Last year I wrote , “Now social learning is being picked up by software vendors and marketers as the next solution-in-a-box, when it’s more of an approach and a cultural mind-set.&# In 2005, social learning online was a fringe activity that we had to test using open source platforms like Drupal. Now everything is “social&#. They understand that collaboration has to be embedded in the workflow.

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2012: That was the year that was

Jane Hart

1 - The Top 100 Tools for Learning 2012 list is revealed. On 1 October 2012 I revealed the results of the 6th Annual Survey of Tools for Learning – the Top 100 Tools for Learning 2012 – and provided a brief analysis of the results. 2 - 10 things to remember about social learning (and the use of social media for learning). 3 - Only 14% think that company training is an essential way for them to learn in the workplace.

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It takes time to be social

Harold Jarche

According to research by the Dachis Group , only 10 – 20% of employees in large organizations are actively engaged with their enterprise social collaboration platforms, as reported in this MIT Sloan article: It may be that for many employees, even in these early adopter firms working to integrate internal social business applications, using these applications do not offer enough value or reason to shift behavior.

What is innovation?

Harold Jarche

The Learning Link. Innovation is dependent on learning in networks. Social learning is about getting things done in networks. Through social learning we can co-develop emergent practices. Social learning is how we move from transactions to relationships and foster knowledge mobilization. Innovation is inextricably linked to both networks and learning. Social learning in the workplace is necessary for any business.

Summarizing Learn for Yourself

Jay Cross

I just copied a rough draft of my new book, Learn For Yourself , into a free summarizer. It’s all a matter of learning, but it’s not the sort of learning that is the province of training departments, workshops, and classrooms. You are learning to learn how to become the person you wrote the obit for. It’s learning to know versus learning to be. Most of what we learn, we learn by interacting with others.

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Learn Informal Learning Informally

Jay Cross

Next month I’ll be offering an experiential workshop on Informal Learning through Jane Hart’s Social Learning Center. Hands-on experiential learning. Collaborate with a self-organizing team to solve problems. Network socially with Socialcast, Buddypress, GoToMeeting, Google+. You learn by doing. By the close of the workshop, you will be able to… understand what informal learning is, how it works, why it’s important.

May 2011 Review

Jane Hart

Mapping informal and formal learning strategies to real work , Tom Gram, Performance X Design, 4 May 2011. The case for online social networking in education , Jose Picardo, 14 May 2011. Without workflow, social business is doomed , Agency Collaboration, 26 May 2011. The Social Learning Community now has over 750 members (since it started in mid-March) and we have had some very valuable conversations about the use of social media for learning.

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