Workplace Learning: Adding, Embedding & Extracting

Charles Jennings

Adding Learning to Work When faced with the opportunities to help with workplace learning, many HR, talent development, and learning professionals react by simply adding learning to the workflow. There is excellent work being carried out that supports embedding learning within workflows. ‘

Building a Culture of Continuous Learning

Charles Jennings

Classes, courses and curricula – structured learning events – don’t provide all the tools in the toolkit. By supporting learning within the workflow, and through and with others, the culture of learning will evolve – I’ve seen it happen Most people get it.

It’s Only 65% !

Charles Jennings

Formal learning’ suggests learning that is designed and directed by someone other than the learner as part of a curriculum, course, programme, module etc. The results of yet another 70:20:10 survey were published recently.

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Start with the 70. Plan for the 100.

Charles Jennings

Extending Learning into the Workflow Many Learning & Development leaders are using the 70:20:10 model to help them re-position their focus for building and supporting performance across their organisations. They are finding it helps them extend the focus on learning out into the workflow.

Designing E-Learning 3.0 in gRSShopper - 13

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

Workflow The next step in the use of badges is to develop a mechanism for awarding them. This is something that can generate a lot of labour in a hurry (9 modules times 10 people means 90 badges issued.). Bootstrap uses classes to control modals (and 'div' elements in general).

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The Only Person Who Behaves Sensibly Is My Tailor

Charles Jennings

We measure how many people have attended a class or completed an eLearning module, or read a document or engaged in a job swap or in a coaching relationship. Attending a course or completing an eLearning module tells us little apart from the fact that some activity occurred.

Text-to-Speech Overview and NLP Quality

Tony Karrer

Text-to-speech can create professional voice narration without any recording which provides significant advantages: keeps narrated presentations continuously up to date (it's too time consuming/expensive to rerecord human narration) faster development - streamlined workflow lower costs. This is now the case for text-to-speech: it’s not yet perfect, but it is good enough for a whole class of applications, especially eLearning and training. This post is a new kind of thing for me.