Measuring Culture Change

Clark Quinn

Someone recently asked how you would go about measuring culture change, and I thought it’s an interesting question. A learning culture is optimal for organizational innovation and agility, and it’s likely that not all elements are already in place. So it’s plausible that you’d want to change, and if you do, you’d like to know how it’s going. Say, for instance, one desirable outcome of a learning culture would be, well, learning!

Changing Culture: Changing the Game

Clark Quinn

I previously wrote about Sutton & Rao’s Scaling up Excellence , and have now finished a quick read of Connors & Smith’s Change the Culture, Change the Game. Sutton & Rao’s was very descriptive of the changes they observed and the emergent lessons. They aptly point out that many change initiatives stop at the second step, and don’t get the necessity of the subsequent two steps.

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OMG, its culture change time

Dave Snowden

If in doubt, blame the culture seems to be a golden rule in consultancy and management alike. And of course once blame has been allocated we end up with a visitation from the cultural change specialists with their tool kit of communication plans, key drivers, motivational posters, games and the like. It's a form of aversion therapy really, change now or we'll put you through a re-education programme. Culture as an “…ideational system.

Changing Culture: Scaling Up Excellence

Clark Quinn

I’ve found myself picking up books about how to change culture, as it seems to be the big barrier to a successful revolution. I’ve finished a quick read of Scaling Up Excellence , am in the midst of Change the Culture, Change the Game , and have Reinventing Organizations and Organize for Complexity (the latter two recommended by my colleague Harold Jarche ) on deck. Leaders have to go in, figure out what needs to change, and then lead that change.

Culture or Cultures?

Clark Quinn

A twitter pointer led me to an HBR article arguing that We’re Thinking about Organizational Culture all Wrong. In it, the author argues that it’s fallacious to think that there’s just one organizational culture, , and that all people buy into it. The first is that the cultural values may be interpreted differently. The second is that people may comply with the culture even if they don’t agree with it. Cultures are developed and do change.

Signifying change

Clark Quinn

There is now quite a bit available about signifying change with ritual. Every culture has had its origin story, and typically stories that explain the earth, the sky, and more. In the former, they may be becoming a member of the community, but it’s about changing personal behavior regardless. And, to be clear, here I’m talking secular change.). The other distinction is the scope of the change. Signifying change is an important component.

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Penultimate: forget cultural change

Dave Snowden

Yesterday I argued that compatible but different cultures had more resilient than a "common culture". Having tackled one of the shibboleths of OD and HR practice I thought I would move onto another namely cultural change. He erected a tent near Birmingham and all staff were encouraged to go to all day sessions to inculcate them with the new culture. Full time change people were exept from real work so that they would be free to herd up the doubters.

Cultural Comment Shift

Clark Quinn

I’ve been blogging now for over a decade, and one thing has changed. The phenomena is that we’re seeing a cultural comment shift; comments are now coming from shared platforms, not directly on the site. The cultural comment shift is merely an indicator of a bigger cultural shift, and as long as we can ride it, we’re good. The post Cultural Comment Shift appeared first on Learnlets.

Cultural change in Singapore

Dave Snowden

If you come to a country once or twice a year (more frequently at times) you get a better sense of change than if you live there. There was concern about innovation and programmes were put into place (some of which I was involved in) to change that. Much is the same, much has changed. I'm back in Singapore for a week working on a portfolio of projects building on work over the past decade.

AI Technologies Are Fundamentally Changing How Work Gets Done

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

The expanded scope will change the value employers place on tasks, and the types of skills most in demand.”. The data set generated by these methods provides much more detail about the changes in tasks within jobs and in skill requirements than traditional survey data.

Adding aesthetics to culture

Dave Snowden

Many years ago now I worked with anthropologist Beth Meriam to design an approach to cultural mapping using SenseMaker®. In effect it has become the underlying Cynefin theory of culture in organisations and society. In developing it we sourced the underlying concepts from cultural anthropology rather than any of the various dominant theories of culture that are popular in organisations. The other is on climate change and that I will announce tomorrow.

What is the locus of change?

Dave Snowden

This is the first in what will be an occasional series of posts in which I want to examine, in the context of change the role of the individual, that individual’s identity as part of society and the affordances provided thereof. But with that comes other senses and background culture.

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Culture 7 of 7: Completion

Dave Snowden

I’ve signalled the twist over the last couple of posts but to make it explicit: the object of any change programme is to ensure that there never needs to be another one. In effect the programme should not complete per se, but instead shift to continuous micro-changes and short cycle feedback loops that characterise a complex eco-system. Changes to the system involve mapping and changing constraints, ideally experimentally with rapid amplification of success and dampening of failure.

Narratives of culture: overture

Dave Snowden

There are some basic truths about culture in organisations that are pretty self-evident to anyone prepared to engage with either theory or practice. In many ways the cultural engineering approaches that typify many a consultancy method have simply responded to the wider engineering metaphor that requires pre-defined outcomes. So next week we will launch a low cost (even lower if you get in early) cultural mapping tool (possibly two) that organisations can use.

Apparently, Organizational Culture is Crap

Dan Pontefract

The one thing we can be assured of until humans safely land and colonize Mars is “ organizational culture ” will continue to be a topic of conversation. Google returns over 22 million hits when you search the term “ organizational cultur e” You can even read what Google has to say about its own culture. You may find it interesting to know, for example, that they “strive to maintain the open culture often associated with startups.”

‘Sharing’ culture

Clark Quinn

I was in a recent conversation about a company facing strong growth and worried about the impact on culture. Companies with a positive culture, a valuable offering, and a good business model are liable to face growth issues, and maintaining or starting a good culture becomes a critical issue to maintaining the organization’s success. This company had a positive culture, in that people were diverse, friendly, upbeat, and committed to contributing.

Reflecting on the State of Enterprise 2.0 as an Organizational Culture Change Agent

Dan Pontefract

to solely be defined as a technology change and not a behavioural change for our organizations. have more to do with an organizational and leadership behavioural change than the discovery of people through content and technology? But if we were to talk about the next generation of the enterprise — Enterprise 2.0 — how could we not discuss behaviour, culture, learning or leadership in concert with the premise of collaborative-based technologies? Culture. I know.

Culture 2 of 7: the canvass

Dave Snowden

I’m not attempting an anthropological treatise here, my focus is on the ubiquitous attempts to engineer culture change in organisations a task that matches the original meaning of a forlorn hope , a mistranslation of verloren hoop whichmeans a lost heap! When you hear about major culture changes achieved in organisations its worth remembering all those which failed and the many many casualties. Where they are loosely coupled change is easy, if tightly coupled less so.

The Vital Role of Culture in Business

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

The January-February issue of the Harvard Business Review spotlights The Culture Factor, with five articles on the subject. “ Culture is the tacit social order of an organization: It shapes attitudes and behaviors in wide-ranging and durable ways,” notes the issue’s lead article. “ Cultural norms define what is encouraged, discouraged, accepted, or rejected within a group. Attributes of Culture. Cultural Styles. Levers for Evolving Culture.

Culture 6 of 7: Adjustments

Dave Snowden

In any art work the final adjustments mean that we are nearing completion, in cultural change I want to argue, it is the sign that the process is only just starting. In an ideal world managing culture would be a constantly evolving process; multiple small micro-changes with a feedback loop in near real time that allows the process to be navigated. Its a structure that we can’t change but we can use. The essence of cultural change is minimalism ….

The evolution of culture

Dave Snowden

I want to start with the culture word and I'm deliberately using lower case and linking with the idea of an evolutionary not an engineering process. It is also distressingly common for people to see culture as a thing and I've even seen web sites that propose using on line surveys with explicit questions to carry out a stock take of culture. The latest example claims originality is discovering that unwritten rules and practices are domain in culture.

Culture Before Strategy

Clark Quinn

In an insightful article, Ken Majer (full disclosure, a boss of mine many years ago) has written about the need to have the right culture before executing strategy. And this strikes me as a valuable contribution to thinking about effective change in the transformation of L&D in the Revolution. I have argued that you can get some benefits from the Revolution without having an optimized culture, but you’re not going to tap into the full potential.

Addressing Changes

Clark Quinn

Yesterday, I listed some of the major changes that L&D needs to acknowledge. As serious practitioners in a potentially valuable field, we need to adapt to the changing environment as much as we need to assist our charges to do so. We also need to understand cultural elements. We’re already seeing a wide variety of converging evidence that these changes lead to success. The post Addressing Changes appeared first on Learnlets.

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changing patterns of connectedness

Harold Jarche

While ‘the masses’ seem harder to reach on issues related to digital politics than ever, a more realistic challenge seems to be the mobilization of those who work – more or less – professionally at the intersection of research, journalism, culture, and activism. ” “Change occurs not so much as a result of new information leading to individual learning but when the patterns of connectedness between individuals change.”

What’s Needed First? Culture Change or Enterprise 2.0 Adoption

Dan Pontefract

Do we first require an organizational culture adaptation prior to any meaningful Enterprise 2.0 tools need to become so simplistic, easy to use and of course generally available to an organization before a culture can be considered connected, flat and more collaborative? Peter Bregman states that an easy way in which to begin changing an organization’s culture is by telling stories. That should change the culture, right?

Changing Cultures in Higher Education

Jay Cross

Last week I received a nice surprise in the mail, Changing Cultures in Higher Education (Ulf Daniel Ehlers and Dirk Schneckberg eds.) However, practices of strategic innovation of universities, faculty development, assessment, evaluation and quality assurance have not fully accommodated these changes in technology and teaching. Springer. Congratulations, guys. 610 pages for a mere $126. It’s good to see that Springer is maintaining its sense of humor.

13 books on learning, people, organizations, corporate culture, and change

Jay Cross

A New Culture of Learning by Douglas Thomas and John Seely Brown. This morning I conducted a webinar on Making Learning Stick. Funny, isn’t it, that we invest so much to help people learn and so little to help them remember? Lots of what we learn goes down the drain before becoming converted to action. To encourage participation, I gave away my favorite books for making the most of learning. It’s a biased list. All but three are by friends and colleagues. I like what I know.

Socio-cultural engineering?

Clark Quinn

Ok, social engineering and cultural engineering have bad connotations in a number of ways. Yet, if I can talk about learning engineering, the desirable properties of cultures for learning, and moves in that direction, aren’t we really talking about socio-cultural engineering? So, if we’re choosing cultural values, and working towards them, both in ways that reflect what science tells us about doing our best, aren’t we really doing such engineering?

Culture is entangled

Dave Snowden

Another Gaping Void cartoon for this second post on culture, which makes the point that change initiatives come and go but relationships that we build can last for ever. If you can find one thing to blame, then there is only one thing to change and life is susceptible to the recipe approaches that are all to common. In practice (and in theory) culture is tangled, indistinct and difficult to tie down.

The Connected Culture

Dan Pontefract

As Churchill once said, “ to improve is to change; to be perfect is to change often. ”. A ‘ connected culture ’ is one that simultaneously drives organizational clarity with precarious innovation. A ‘ connected culture’ , in its simplest, orderly and most chaotic form, refers to the point at which all employees act as one corporate organism. The following diagram aims to depict what I refer to as a ‘connected culture’ in an organization.

Corporate culture

Harold Jarche

Tweet Next month I’ll be discussing corporate culture at Sibos in Toronto. My view (not original) is that corporate culture is an emergent property. Culture happens, and like a child, once born, the parents are not really in control. This is what I call perpetual Beta; constantly probing the environment, sensing what happens and then responding by creating Beta practices; but always ready to discard them should the situation change.

Culture 5 of 7: Colouring in

Dave Snowden

Culture is also context specific so few aspects of change can be achieved through context free recipes and formulaic approaches that are all too common. But at this stage the broad structure of out painting has been achieved, the contrast of light and dark determined and hopefully we started off by being realistic about where we are and what changes are possible. Small local changes, locally initiated, within a wider, loose framework is how you achieve sustainable change ….

Narratives of culture: the score

Dave Snowden

This is going to be a little out of sequence, but I want to come to how we gather narrative for the new culture scans in future posts. That means the organisation may have an issue if the pace of change in their sector does not allow for full analysis, or if ethics compete with numbers then there might be an issue. The leap to the top right is probably a step too far, but would be the normal focus of change programmes.

Culture 4 of 7: Light and Dark

Dave Snowden

So when we start to look at organisational change we have choices to make. We’ve got the big picture, we’ve mapped the landscape, now we have to start to think about who we use the light and dark of differences to motivate people to change, or simply to sustain what is valuable in the here and now. A key aspect of organisational change (this can link back to scaffolding) is the necessity of focusing on one thing to stimulate responses within the wider eco-system.

The Vital Role of Culture in Business

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

The January-February issue of the Harvard Business Review spotlights The Culture Factor, with five articles on the subject. “ Culture is the tacit social order of an organization: It shapes attitudes and behaviors in wide-ranging and durable ways,” notes the issue’s lead article. “ Cultural norms define what is encouraged, discouraged, accepted, or rejected within a group. Attributes of Culture. Cultural Styles. Levers for Evolving Culture.

How is the culture of luxury changing?

Trends in the Living Networks

Tim Stock of scenarioDNA has created an excellent presentation on the Culture of Luxury, shown here. The Culture of Luxury 2011 (Brand Packaging). How we perceive luxury depends on whether we come to it from a perspective of what it is (tasteful, refined, expressive of the best of human culture and creativity) or its accompanying financial and status attributes (expensive, denoting wealth, and a desire to be seen as tasteful).

Leadership in a Changing World

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

What are the critical competencies needed to lead in our fast-changing business environment? The key challenge confronting CEOs, - and senior executives in general, - is the relentless pace of change. But, w hile speed is the major dimension of change, it’s not the only one. Is the change evolutionary or revolutionary in nature? While ignoring major changes is bad, acting before understanding its implications could be worse.

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Culture is our nature

Harold Jarche

And we did it by developing new abilities for cultural transmission and change. As the anthropologist Pascal Boyer points out in his answer, it’s tempting to talk about “the culture” of a group as if this is some mysterious force outside the biological individual or independent of evolution. But culture is a biological phenomenon. Culture is our nature, and the ability to learn and change is our most important and fundamental instinct.

The change is here

Clark Quinn

For a number of years now (at least six ), I’ve been beating the drum about the need for organizations to be prepared to address change. Now we’re seeing the evidence that the change has arrived. With different perspectives, they both overlap in discussing the importance of culture. The first point for leaders is to use data and focus on culture. The world’s changing, and L&D needs to adapt.

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Human Capital and the Changing Nature of Work

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

But on balance, such fears appear to be unfounded, noted the World Bank in a comprehensive recent report on The Changing Nature of Work. That’s a mistake, because neglecting investments in human capital can dramatically weaken a country’s competitiveness in a rapidly changing world, one in which economies need ever-increasing amounts of talent to sustain growth.” . How is the Nature of Work Changing? People have long feared that machines are coming for our jobs.

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Using network perspectives to visualize changing culture and meaning

Trends in the Living Networks

I’m a big fan of Tim Stock ‘s work, which weaves together a deep network perspective with a rich view of how culture is changing informed by semiotic analysis. I earlier shared one of his presentations in a post on how the culture of luxury is changing. The slides to his presentation at SXSW today on Culture Networks and the codes that drive them are available below. Culture Networks (SXSW 2012).

Lessons In Culture From United Airlines

Dan Pontefract

Specifically, I wanted to know if she felt their new CEO, Oscar Muñoz, would bring any change to the company, its culture and its operating practices. “Oh It seems Mr. Muñoz wants to unite its corporate culture, in an attempt to improve its operations. It’s another example of how Muñoz seems committed to uniting its culture, such that it serves the interests of all of its stakeholders (customers, employees and the community) far better than it has been in recent years.

Art Changes Now Too

Nine Shift

100 Years Ago, culture and art changed to match the Industrial Age. Today culture and art is changing to match the Knowledge Society. Digital Art is evolving. A friend of our son has a job in digital art. Here's me testing virtual art at the campus of the University of Southern California earlier this year.

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