What is the locus of change?

Dave Snowden

This is the first in what will be an occasional series of posts in which I want to examine, in the context of change the role of the individual, that individual’s identity as part of society and the affordances provided thereof. The post What is the locus of change?

Change 199

What Improvisation Can Teach Social Change Leaders

Beth Kanter

The retreat curriculum is built around the a framework called “I-WE-IT” that covers mindsets and practical skills that today’s social change leaders of all generations need as we move towards more collective approaches. He lead us on a series of improvisation exercises designed to teach important skills for networked leaders: empathy, awareness, celebrating failure, being open to change and more. Her points about leadership and change.

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It is mind control but not as we know it

Mind Hacks

Unfortunately, the intricate details of brain activity tend to get muffled by the scalp, and the fact that you are recording at one specific point in space, so the technology’s strength is more in telling us that brain activity has changed, rather than in saying how or exactly where brain activity has changed. The dizzying complexities of brain activity are compressed into an EEG signal which is still highly complex, and pretty opaque as to what it means – hardly mind reading.

Pluck 75

A cortical atlas of ghostly sensations

Mind Hacks

Here's the entry for the temporal lobe: Stimulations in the anterior medial temporal structures were associated with complex feelings and illusions such as feeling of unreality or familiarity (déjà vu) or illusion of dream-like state; emotional feelings such as feeling of loneliness, fear, urge to cry, anger, anxiety, levitation, or lightness; and recall of past experiences.

Pluck 54

Questioning 'one in four'

Mind Hacks

The issue of how many people have or will have a mental illness raises two complex issues: how we define an illness and how we count them. For example, when are changes in heart function enough for them to be considered 'heart disease'? The idea of a personal change 'causing a problem' is also influenced by culture as it relies on what we value as part of a fulfilling life. The '1 in 4' figures seems to have been mostly plucked out of the air.

Questionning 'one in four'

Mind Hacks

The issue of how many people have or will have a mental illness raises two complex issues: how we define an illness and how we count them. For example, when are changes in heart function enough for them to be considered 'heart disease'. The idea of a personal change 'causing a problem' is also influenced by culture as it relies on what we value as part of a fulfilling life. The '1 in 4' figures seems to have been mostly plucked out of the air.