Isn’t CEO Activism Simply Doing What’s Right?

Dan Pontefract

You're reading fresh content from Dan Pontefract at Brave New Org: Merriam-Webster defines the word activism as “a doctrine or practice that emphasizes direct vigorous action especially in support of or opposition to one side of a controversial. CEO Purpose CEO activism purpose

Deeper activities

Clark Quinn

A while ago, I argued for an activity-based curriculum. The In trying to move beyond good, albeittraditional, elearning, I’ve been working hard on the notion of what a meaningful activity (read: practice, task, etc) would be. As The point was to rebel against the usual content-based curriculum, and push us to more meaningful learning. And, of late, I’ve had a chance to reexamine both the curriculum ideas, and the pedagogical implications.

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Metacognitive Activity?

Clark Quinn

That is, not only what activity might mean learning, but what mean meta-learning? I started wondering about a vocabulary, but realized that you’d have to have activity that you could actually detect was evidence of meta-learning. To each of the elements, I attributed activities that would constitute learning in that model, and then above it I was thinking what would constitute meta-learning.

Constraints on activities

Clark Quinn

When we design learning activities (per the activity-based learning model ), ideally we’re looking to create an integration of a number of constraints around that assignment. Of course, that’s factored into the objective for this learning activity (which is part of an overall sequence of learning). We also need the challenge in the activity to be in the right range of difficulty for the learner.

Activities for Integrating Learning

Clark Quinn

It draws heavily on the notion of activity -based learning. The learning process is broken up into a series of activities. Each activity starts with giving the learning teams a deliverable they have to create, with a deadline an appropriate distance out. There may be people available for questions, and they’re also being actively watched and coached (less as they go on).

Activity or Application?

Clark Quinn

Activity : that the learner takes, and. Now, in many ways, this is similar to my own activity-based design , which is more a curricular model than a pedagogical one, but it foregrounds activity instead of content. Perhaps because I’d been thinking (and whinging) about ‘click to see more’ interactions, I want those activities to mean something! Those are activities, just not cognitively challenging ones. The post Activity or Application?

Reconciling Activity and Decisions

Clark Quinn

On the one hand I talk about using decisions as a basis for design, and on the other I refer to activity -based learning. What was necessary was reconciling activity and decisions. However, I also have characterized learning as a series of activities, and those activities generate some work product and are (ideally) annotated with reflections. That’s my reconciliation of activity and decisions.

Reimagined Learning: Activities elaborated

Clark Quinn

In this case, I want to elaborate on the notion of activities, and some associated properties. First, I think it’s important to recognize that gradually, learners will take more and more ownership of choosing activities. Another important property of these activities is that they embed, possibly at multiple levels. Each of those would be activities with deliverables or products, and evaluation or reflection. Finally, activities can be individual or social.

Activate your knowledge

Harold Jarche

It is a framework that helps move from an awareness of knowledge to activation of its use in the context of getting work done. Activation of knowledge happens in the context of tasks and so the cycle continues. PKM is much more than processing information. It’s about ideas, conversations and especially relationships. Most of all, PKM is a framework to actually do knowledge work.

Innovation is a network activity

Harold Jarche

In business, attention is paid to innovative individuals, especially those who go on to become captains of industry. But of more importance is the ability of the network (society, organization, company) to stay connected to its collective knowledge in order to keep innovating. Just think how quickly an organization would its lose collective knowledge if people did not share their knowledge. What about an entire society? You start out with two genetically well-intermixed peoples.

Internet Activities Do NOT Affect Adolescence Development

Dan Pontefract

Mills states: Current evidence suggests that typical Internet activities do not impair social development during adolescence. Depending on the scope and topic of a keynote address I deliver, there is a point in the talk where I might tell the story about our three young goats, and why Denise and I are coaching them to publicly blog. I even wrote a post about it entitled, “ Our Three Young Children Blog … Here’s Why “ An article by Kathryn L.

From Passive to Active Learners - Consumers to Creators

Eide Neurolearning

If you really want to work your brain, your learning should be active and not passive. Some students are able to do this on their own (make their learning active), while others.well, not. Active learning may mean asking questions, challenging assumptions (a little provocation may be good), drawing connections between existing information, and yes doing something with the information and making something yourself. passive learning active learning creativity story listening

Active sense-making

Harold Jarche

Sense-making is an activity, a regular practice. I added a sense-making activity about a year ago when I realized I was losing track of what I was finding on Twitter. The activity of reading, writing and perhaps commenting helps to internalize some of the knowledge. Yesterday, during my presentation on personal knowledge management to IBM BlueIQ I was asked about the role of blogging in my own sense-making processes.

Active Data Logging Doesn’t Work

Adaptive Path

I learned that from my house to where I worked there were about a thousand steps, I was a lot more active on the weekends than I was on the weekdays and my work-week physical activity was highest on Monday and trailed off as the week went on; I was learning a lot. It was, and still is, very interesting and useful information for me and, with few exceptions, I’ve tracked my physical activity every day since.

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Types and proportions of learning activities?

Clark Quinn

I’ve been on quite the roll of late, calling out some bad practices and calling for learning science. And it occurs to me that there could be some pushback. So let me be clear, I strongly suggest that the types of learning that are needed are not info dump and knowledge test, by and large. What does that mean? Let’s break it down. First, let me suggest that what’s going to make a difference to organizations is not better fact-remembering.

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Activity Streams

Jay Cross

An activity stream is a mash-up of an individual’s or organization’s feeds. For example, my FriendFeed pages show activity from this blog, the Internet Time Blog, my Flickr account, bookmarks I put on Delicious, and my entries from Twitter. As people use various different web sites to blog, update their status, post their location, or photos, sites and tools have emerged to aggregate these various actions into a continuous eclectic stream of activities.

Blog Post: Promoting Knowledge Management activities through my website

David Gurteen

By David Gurteen I am always looking to help promote activities in the KM field. To this end you can: post events on my site. post jobs on my site. post news items on my site. In each case, the submission is held in a queue until I have checked it out and categorised it. This normally only takes a day or two. If the item is off-topic or I feel it is inappropriate for any other reason I reserve the right to delete it. The service is free

Blog Post: Promoting Knowledge Management activities through my website

David Gurteen

By David Gurteen I am always looking to help promote activities in the KM field. To this end you can: post events on my site. post jobs on my site. post books or reports on my site. post news items on my site. In each case, the submission is held in a queue until I have checked it out and categorised it. This normally only takes a day or two. If the item is off topic or I feel it is inappropriate for any other reason I reserve the right to delete it. The service is free

Patent Activity and the State of US Innovation

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

A few weeks ago, the Brookings Institution released a study that looks in detail at patenting activity in the US from 1980 to 2012 - Patenting Prosperity: Invention and Economic Performance in the United States and its Metropolitan Areas. The study examines whether patent activity is a good concrete indicator of innovation, economic growth and productivity by looking at historical data going all the way back to 1790.

Spike activity 21-07-2015

Mind Hacks

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: Be wary of studies that link mental illness with creativity or high IQ. Good piece in The Guardian. Nautilus has a piece on the lost dream journal of neuroscientist Santiago Ramon y Cajal. Video games are tackling mental health with mixed results. Great piece in Engadget. The Globe and Mail asks how we spot the next ‘lone wolf’ terrorist and looks at some of the latest research which has changed what people look for.

Spike activity 10-06-2016

Mind Hacks

Using image processing to improve reconstruction of movies from brain activity. Remarkable but trippy extraction of video from brain activity from Jack Gallant’s lab. Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: The New York Times has a fascinating piece on the online community of people who believe they are being ‘gang stalked’ Completely destroy the immune system with chemotherapy and rebuild it with stem cells.

Spike activity 10-06-2016

Mind Hacks

Using image processing to improve reconstruction of movies from brain activity. Remarkable but trippy extraction of video from brain activity from Jack Gallant’s lab. Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: The New York Times has a fascinating piece on the online community of people who believe they are being ‘gang stalked’ Completely destroy the immune system with chemotherapy and rebuild it with stem cells.

Spike activity 13-07-2015

Mind Hacks

A slightly belated Spike Activity to capture some of the responses to the APA report plus quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: APA makes a non-apology on Twitter and gets panned in response. “the organization’s long-standing ethics director, Stephen Behnke, had been removed from his position as a result of the report and signaled that other firings or sanctions could follow” according to the Washington Post.

Spike activity 12-05-2015

Mind Hacks

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: No, there is no evidence for a link between video games and Alzheimer’s disease, reports HeadQuarters after recent media bungles. We’re still waiting to hear on SimCity and Parkinson’s disease though. The American Psychiatric Association has a new corporate video that looks like a Viagra advert. BPS Research Digest reports on a fascinating study that gives a preliminary taxonomy of the voices inside your head.

Spike activity 13-11-2015

Mind Hacks

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: The Weak Science Behind the Wrongly Named Moral Molecule. The Atlantic has some home truths about oxytocin. Neurophilosophy reports on some half a billion year old brains found preserved in fool’s gold. An Illuminated, 5,000-Pound Neuron Sculpture Is Coming to Boston. Boston magazine has some pictures. Guardian Science Weekly podcast has neuroscientist David Eagleman discussing his new book.

Spike activity 09-10-2015

Mind Hacks

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: How much can you really learn while you’re asleep ? Interesting piece that looks at what the research genuinely tells us in The Guardian. Comedian John Oliver takes on mental health in America with a segment which is both funny and sharp. Neuroecology has an excellent post looking at the latest mega-paper from the Blue Brain Project.

Spike activity 18-12-2015

Mind Hacks

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: 12% of women have eyes with four colour-detecting cone cells instead of three. Why don’t they all have superhuman colour vision? Fascinating piece from great new blog Neurosphere. The BMJ has a genuine but wonderfully sarcastic fMRI study on a Christmas spirit network in the brain.

Spike activity 04-09-2015

Mind Hacks

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: Go get your gramophonic digital podcast player and listen to this amazing BBC Radio 4 programme on how the social discussion of dreams has changed through history. The Atlantic on what Google’s trippy neural network -generated images tell us about the human mind.

Spike activity 24-07-2015

Mind Hacks

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: Why does the concept of ‘schizophrenia’ still persist? Great post from Psychodiagnosticator. Nature reviews two new movies on notorious psychology experiments: the Stanford Prison Experiment and Milgram’s conformity experiments. Can the thought of money make people more conservative? Another social priming effect bites the dust Neuroskeptic with a great analysis.

Spike activity 06-11-2015

Mind Hacks

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: If you only read one thing this week, make it the excellent critical piece on the concept of an ‘autism spectrum’ in The Atlantic. Nature reports that the controversial big bucks Human Brain Project has secured another three years’ funding. Giant all-knowing neurotron brain simulation coming “any day now” The psychological power of narrative. Good piece in Nautilus.

Spike activity 25-09-2015

Mind Hacks

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: Science has a fascinating piece on how cultures developed words for numbers – many languages don’t have words for numbers above five. The majority illusion. The social illusion covered by Tech Review where something can seem socially common despite being rare in the overall group. Wired has a thought-provoking piece on the potential role of the internet in hastening the demise of dying languages.

Spike activity 08-05-2015

Mind Hacks

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: An autonomous truck has been cleared to drive on US roads for the first time according to New Scientist. Robot mudflap girl still being designed. Backchannel covers the recent Facebook filter bubble study. Rare helpful write-up. Surge in US ‘ brain-reading ‘ patents reports BBC News. Most of which are junk, concludes article.

Spike activity 06-03-2015

Mind Hacks

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: The strange world of felt presences. Great piece in The Guardian. Nature reports that the Human Brain Project has voted for a change of leadership. But read carefully, it’s not clear how much will change in practice. Surely the worst ‘neuroscience of’ article ever written? “The Neuroscience of ISIS” from The Daily Beast. Ruthlessly, it’s the first in a series.

Spike activity 12-06-2015

Mind Hacks

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: The New York Times has a fascinating piece about the three waves of ancient peoples who arrived in Europe to found the modern population. I am shocked, shocked I tell you, that the UK Government are deliberately side-lining their own scientific advisors to implement an unworkable ban on psychoactive substances. Reported by BBC News.

Spike activity 23-10-2015

Mind Hacks

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: MP tricked into condemning a fake drug called ‘Cake’ on Brass Eye has been put in charge of scrutinising drugs policy in the UK Parliament, reports The Independent. What starts as satire is so often reborn as policy. Narratively takes a look at the human stories behind the alarming rates of prescription opioid addiction in Appalachia. Mental health research makes good economic sense, argues The Economist.

Spike activity 02-10-2015

Mind Hacks

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: The madness of Charlie Brown. The Lancet has a wonderful article on Lucy, Charlie Brown’s local psychiatrist. The Atlantic has an excellent piece on new research showing neurons have different genomes. Mexico’s 13-year-old psychologist is amazing , reports USA Today. Sí, es. PLOS Neuro has an excellent in-depth piece about the neuroscience of sleep deprivation.

Spike activity 28-08-2015

Mind Hacks

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: Vice has an excellent documentary about how skater Paul Alexander was affected by mental illness as he was turning pro. The US Navy is working on AI that can predict a pirate attacks reports Science News. Apparently it uses Arrrrgh-tificial intelligence. I’m here all week folks. The New York Times has a good piece on the case for teaching ignorance to help frame our understanding of science.

Spike activity 26-06-2015

Mind Hacks

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: Picture This? Some Just Can’t. The New York Times covers a new study on people without visual imagery – that science writer Carl Zimmer helped discover. New Republic on how the Romans understood hallucinations. “They did not have a single concept of ‘hallucination’ until very late on” Science of the pornocalypse. Aeon has an excellent piece that looks at the evidence for benefits and harms of pornography.

Spike activity 11-09-2015

Mind Hacks

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: Mental illness throughout the animal kingdom. Interesting piece from BBC Earth. The Guardian has an excellent in-depth article on scorpion venom as a way of identifying brain tumours during neurosurgery. There’s an excellent piece on the history of using deception in psychology studies over at Aeon. The Covnersation has an excellent piece on how so much talk about ‘the brain’ in education is meaningless.

Spike activity 05-06-2015

Mind Hacks

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: Fusion has an oddly fascinating piece on the AI of dick pic detection which turns out to be a surprisingly hard problem (matron). Uber poaches 40 people from Carnegie Mellon’s robotics researcher community wanting to boost their autonomous car technology according to the Market Watch. Brain Metrics has an excellent primer on a key neuroscience technique: What does MEG measure?

Spike activity 15-05-2015

Mind Hacks

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: What does fMRI measure? Excellent fMRI primer on the Brain Box blog. The Wall Street Journal has an excellent profile of neuroscientist Sophie Scott and her research understanding laughter. Time has a piece on how rappers are de-stigmatising mental illness. A brilliant review of neurosurgeon Henry Marsh’s book ‘Do No Harm’ from The New Yorker also works as a wonderful stand-alone article.

Spike activity 29-05-2015

Mind Hacks

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: The Psychologist has a great piece by leading neurosurgeon Henry Marsh on mistakes, mystery and the mind. When Does Consciousness Begin and End? Interesting piece from PBS. The Lancet Psychiatry has a great piece on a unique suicide crisis resolution house in London. Who Are You Now? Brilliant site from Headway East London on life stories of brain injury survivors.

Spike activity 14-07-2015

Mind Hacks

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: Trends and fashions in the science of neurotransmitters. Neuroskeptic looks at this seasons hottest brain chemicals. MIT Tech Reviews has an interesting piece on the new wave of normal hearing enhancement hearing aids. Sorry Paleo diet aficionados, carbs were probably essentially to our evolving brains in early human history. Good piece in The New York Times.