Martijn Linssen

Interactive Coptic-English translation of (the gospel of) Thomas

Martijn Linssen

The goals behind this translation are twofold: this is the most pure translation that can exist, and it is fully traceable: each and every word is accounted for and can be verified with one single click by everyone, as long as there is access to the Internet: that is where the full and complete online Coptic Dictionary of KELLIA is at.

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Why I left, and the reason for my return

Martijn Linssen

I pretty much left Twitter - and my blog - in 2013. Whereas I usually quit cold turkey, this time I lingered a bit, publishing a handful of blog posts in 2013, even one in 2014, and I'm sure that my Twitter activity followed much the same pattern; I've always said that the combination of the two is what upholds my 'Circle of Inspiration'. Why did I leave?

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Waking up.

Martijn Linssen

I think we are waking up. From my limited perch, it appears sudden clarity is emerging in businesses. The past months I have been privileged to work with clients who get it. The rebels deep within their walls are being heeded, funded, and presented with the intractable questions. Having tried everything in the MBA kit bag, they are willing to consider almost anything. One caveat before I go further. Chief Financial Officers still set the de facto business strategy for too many companies.

Rebels at Work: The Pragmatist

Martijn Linssen

Carmen Medina’s blog post caught my eye over at Rebels at Work, regarding emerging archetypes for what they call “Bureaucratic Black Belts.”. First, let’s remind ourselves of who BBB’s are and what they do. Bureaucratic Black Belts are those individuals in an organization who have mastered all the ins and outs of both its bureaucratic rules and bureaucratic culture.

Menlo Park Syndrome

Martijn Linssen

Psychologists refer to something called the capture-bonding psychological trait, something Wikipedia claims may ‘lie behind battered-wife syndrome, military basic training, fraternity hazing,’ and so forth. That reference to basic training is illuminating. I recall my first night in basic, looking out the window at a bird on a wire as I struggled to relax. After a time, I noticed the bird was long gone and the sky was a different, lighter color.

The Expertise Strikes Back

Martijn Linssen

Tom Nichols writes of the death of expertise in a recent, well-received blog. When he first tweeted a reference to the topic, as he was writing it, I immediately thought he was referring to Cognitive Resource Theory (CRT) – the finding that expertise is essential in high-stress decision environments, but less so in low-stress decision environments, where we may be better served to listen to intelligent voices with little experience in the specific field.

People, Organization, Technology?

Martijn Linssen

I see my friend Dave Snowden is extending/rethinking/refining his Cynefin framework, which emboldens me to follow through on an idea that won’t leave me. More completely, an idea that challenges some basic axioms and cliches that have haunted my PowerPoint/Keynote presentations for years. Headed for my personal trash bin: ‘People, Process, Technology.’ There are 298,000 hits on the Google machine for that phrase (in quotes) – so some will no doubt disagree.

Social Media Centers of Excellence? Really?

Martijn Linssen

My morning Twitter feed led to me to an article released in July of this year, an intriguing if baffling idea from Dion Hinchcliffe here. I put my tea down. Here’s my issue with the thoughtful piece linked above: it treats ‘social media’ as just another enterprise skill that needs to be accommodated with the same management approaches: stakeholders, goals & requirements, processes, knowledge base, etc.

Defibrillating Knowledge Management

Martijn Linssen

This is not the original title for this blog, the change is a bow towards the good folks on the ACT-KM listserv, some of whom are checking for a pulse on the teenaged wrist of Knowledge Management. The social graph used to be analog, fleeting and personal – which extended to our metaphors: “Whom do you call?” “When you spin your office chair around, who are you looking to?”

2010-2020: The Great Divide

Martijn Linssen

A Great Divide is what I see for the coming decade. Not a hydrological divide of the Americas, but an IT-divide of the business. Pretty much a follow-up from my one year-old Cloud and Social: the tectonic plates of IT 2.0

“Complicated” vs. “Complex”

Martijn Linssen

Someone asked for comment, I offered it. The background: A gentleman who makes a living “reducing complexity” for IT systems keeps running into some of us on Twitter who study complexity. You can imagine the entertaining exchanges, which led to his posting these observations on his LinkedIn group. The ask: There is a group of complexity aficionados that criticize my use of the word “complexity.”

Generations, Social and Enterprise: adopt vs adapt

Martijn Linssen

[Never mind the Dutch text please, it's the only picture I could find apt enough] Today I read the words adopt, social and enterprise and tweeted: You can't adopt Social to the Enterprise, you have to adapt the Enterprise to SocialThat

All Social is Learning | Organizational Knowledge Design

Martijn Linssen

I've been reflecting lately on my brief sojourn into education reform prior to returning to “the world.” Several things I learned there, including the idea that how brains work and how people interact represent new fields of study to

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Trusting the Terrain

Martijn Linssen

This picture does not indicate a non-stop train. One would think, if one did not speak Dutch, that you boarded the train at Tilburg, and de-trained at Den Haag Centraal. (My My actual origin point was Eindhoven a few hours earlier, but that’s part of the story.). To expand.

The Guru Problem

Martijn Linssen

Years back, I had the good fortune to talk with David Gilmour, back when he was deeply involved in the Tacit Knowledge System. The software, since absorbed and disappeared by Oracle (hoping my Oracle friends can correct me here), simply allowed you to find expertise. You ask a question, and the system decided who could help you based on a simple Natural Language Processing (NLP) analysis of corporate emails.

The Evangelist, the Priest and the Monk?

Martijn Linssen

I eavesdropped on a conversation yesterday between Olivier Blanchard and David Armano. Tracing it back, this is where it started: David ended that Twitter day with. building is harder than tearing. no doubt referring to this debate

Job-Killing Processes

Martijn Linssen

I’ve been wrestling with a thought lately – if organizations are complex systems, and complex systems are continuously self-organizing, then why do we believe formal processes make these complex systems more efficient? Worse, when an organization is in need, why do we engage in process improvement – when what may be needed is process reduction or elimination? This is not the first paragraph to question process improvement, this is not some original Eureka moment.

The Roadmap to 'Hadoop in the Cloud'

Martijn Linssen

The Twitter ball started rolling again just now. Matt Asay posed an interesting question about Forrester suggesting Hadoop isn't a great fit for the cloud.

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The Death of Mystery?

Martijn Linssen

A view of the Arctic ice in August 2012. Actor Bruce Dern was on a show recently where he mused about his first days in Hollywood rubbing shoulders with the giants of the entertainment industry. They were larger than life,” he told the host, “because no one knew what they were doing after school.” He finished by offering: ‘now everyone knows what happens after school, and there is no more mystery.’.

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Mussels in vinegar

Martijn Linssen

A recipe for a Social Media experience A column not for the fainthearted Recently I commented on a picture, posted on Facebook. The picture showed somebody’s hand, holding a mussel, over dinner. Its caption said: "Seek the ten differences". For those with a dirty mind like mine, this needs no further explanation. I commented on this photo. Of course I did, that’s me! One of the differences, I stated, was that funny looking hard shell, which was new to me.

These are not the requirements you are looking for…

Martijn Linssen

How do you “engage stakeholders” and “gather requirements” in 2011? Outside the workplace, people and technology have co-evolved. We Facebook,” we text, we tweet, some of us “check in,” all while listening to music that is streaming to us on customized or micro-segmented “radio” channels. We connect with friends long moved away, we coordinate over space and time and find projects and opportunities – and occasionally love (authorized and not).

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Breaking Down Love’s Checklist

Martijn Linssen

I was confronted today by a checklist posted by a friend – 10 questions that “should be asked before your wedding day.” I found the questions absurd, as someone with 29 years of marriage under my belt, and suggested she pass these before long-married couples, and count the ones who say, “yeah, that’s what we did!” The friend then challenged me to respond in a blog, revealing what I see as the ‘keys’ to a good marriage.

Why acquisition beats retention

Martijn Linssen

In a short conversation with Graham Hill today, the topic of acquisition versus retention was brought up. My response to Graham's initial question was "human nature": @GrahamHill: If only banks, utilities, telcos put as much effort into

IM v KM

Martijn Linssen

I enjoyed a pleasant email exchange recently with someone who referenced an earlier (infamous?) blog posting regarding what I witnessed as the death of Knowledge Management in the U.S. Department of Defense. Without rehashing that work, I was interested to see that the post was circulating again. I’m happy to be updated on what I saw in 2009, and welcome any opportunity to update that observation.

Twitter, just show us the algorithm - please?

Martijn Linssen

After all the various stories about the hashtag #wikileaks not appearing as a Twitter trending topic, and whether that was plain Twitter censorship, some magical (and not quantified nor explained) algorithm or the hand of God

Business or Pleasure? - why not both: Capgemini's comma-splice.

Martijn Linssen

An obvious screenshot from the renewed site, here's the latest Capgemini slogan. Capgemini presented a glossy new site this Monday, announced and talked about on Twitter. It looks really suave, but not everything has moved correctly

Moron Facebook

Martijn Linssen

Actually, I mean “More on Facebook,” but as I was once accused of using fancy headlines to draw clicks (to this site with no advertising), I thought I would play the part and see if that behavior makes any difference. Tongue is firmly encheeked. Also, this isn’t about Facebook at all. Not really.

Mark Zuckerberg no longer a social norm

Martijn Linssen

A few days ago Mark Zuckerberg was offered another podium at San Francisco's Crunchie Awards, where he dared to state that privacy was no longer a social norm. People have really gotten comfortable not only sharing more information and

In Defense of Data Centrism

Martijn Linssen

In Defense of Data Centrism. In the never ending search to know “what works,” we have a few choices. We can look to theories, ie, this 'should' work; or we can look to data. Often the latter choice is considered backward looking

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Quora: a gossiper's wet dream

Martijn Linssen

And yes, it is a big wet dream to begin with, for all those self-promoters out there overshadowing the few good and helpful answers that are given on the platform An ingenious tweet from Olivier Blanchard in a rather long conversation

Stop breaking down silos, let's enginize the pistons

Martijn Linssen

Everywhere I go these days I encounter the call for integrating everything into anything and the words "break down silos". While the former I applaud, the latter is a politically incorrect way to address the stakeholders (sic

Business or Pleasure? - why not both: Klout. Nail. Coffin. Who cares?

Martijn Linssen

[Showing true and visible Influence, "The swirl at the wingtip traces the aircraft's wake vortex, which exerts a powerful influence on the flow field behind the plane"] This is my last post on @Klout - period

Enterprise 1.0 - The Dysfunctional Family?

Martijn Linssen

I compared the enterprise to a dysfunctional family a little while ago. As it turns out, there are many, many similarities. Let's see how far I get on this post without writing a book in stead of a post

Free Yourselves from the Tyranny of the Document Metaphor!

Martijn Linssen

(My title comes from a former colleague who buried this bon mot in a client deliverable – if she wishes me to name her, I shall. Else, know this headline gem is just something I wish I'd written.) I interjected myself into a listserv

Business or Pleasure? - why not both: Enterprise 2.0: The Prodigal.

Martijn Linssen

Stranger titles have appeared on this blog. Following the Enterprise 2.0 conference on Twitter via its hashtag #e2conf, I noticed a strange phenomenon: most tweets weren't about Enterprise 2.0, but Social Business

Why I think @Klout is Krap

Martijn Linssen

After my last post it wasn't hard to come up with this devious title. At the defrag conference, Philip Hotchkiss from Klout took the stage, resulting in a few tweets about the perceived value and accuracy of Klout

Business or Pleasure? - why not both: Microsoft and Cloud - they.

Martijn Linssen

I myself think it is extremely funny what is depicted there: the instruction to download (from the Cloud!) and install Microsoft Silverlight (on your local machine!) in order to be able to see how fantastically great Microsoft is for

How Bottom-Feeders May Be Accelerating Tribalism

Martijn Linssen

Two events in this young week spur me to the keyboard. In the face of social media evangelists who see only the upside of increased global connections – new business models, micro-financing, etc. – we also see the dark side of humanity amplified.

Disturbing, this Distributing Cognition

Martijn Linssen

For the umpteenth time, I yelled up the stairs to my teenaged daughter – the most unflappable human I knew. “Did Did you put the garbage out?” “Ok,” came the laconic response. “Ok? How is that an answer? Why do I have to remind you every week?” Minutes later, she bumbled down the stairs with a sigh, and went about her task. Uncomplaining, but judgmental in the way only teenaged girls can carry off. In calmer times, I asked her a deeper question.

Pardon my Dust

Martijn Linssen

I need to blog more often. I’ve known this for some time, and wanted to get an apology out to anyone who follows this page. After chastisement duly administered by a certain dear Spanish friend, I am finally taking steps to increase the rate of blog posts on this little cul-de-sac. Said chastisement occurred five months ago, so you can see how hard this is for me.)

The Call Button

Martijn Linssen

NYT article on the consequences of nurse staffing. I began to emerge from a truly black sleep, only to feel a wave of agony coming from the front of my face. I felt as if a train were hurtling into my head, over and over. I found myself panting and grunting, unable to even cry out in pain. A soothing voice, next to my ear, told me that she was going to take care of me. The waves subsided, but only because I was falling asleep again.

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Real Profitability Part I: The Big Three and Four

Martijn Linssen

After last post about the wondrous differences between absolute statistics and relative statistics, I decided to do a post and show you what I carry in my back-pocket before attending an event where The Big Three (GOOG, MSFT and AAPL

Business or Pleasure? - why not both: Why customer service can't.

Martijn Linssen

Business or Pleasure? - Why not both. Redefining the meaning of ICT analysis for consumers, enterprises and governments