Harold Jarche

finding community

Harold Jarche

Many work teams today are distributed geographically, culturally, or in different time zones. But trust is required before real knowledge-sharing can happen. This is especially the case of sharing complex knowledge which requires strong social ties for trusted professional relationships.

a conversation on leadership in the network era

Harold Jarche

I write about leadership frequently, especially how leadership in a network requires different skills and abilities than positional leadership provided by the inherent power structure of an organization or institution. In networks, influence comes through reputation.

first we kill the jobs

Harold Jarche

Donald Clark shows how WildFire , a machine-augmented instructional content development system, saved significant time and money to develop a global training program. “We used an AI tool to deliver a project to a large multinational (TUI) with £16 billion in revenue.

Module 234

network literacies

Harold Jarche

Distributed governance was part of the conversation at RESET18 in Helsinki last month, where I discussed networks, communities of practice, knowledge-sharing, and sense-making, in the context of the Finnish civil service.

21 lessons

Harold Jarche

“Without realizing the value of solitude, we are overlooking the fact that, once the fear of boredom is faced, it can actually provide its own stimulation.

#ForTheWeb

Harold Jarche

For the Web is part of the Worldwide Web Foundation — “established in 2009 by web inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee to advance the open web as a public good and a basic right … fighting for digital equality — a world where everyone can access the web and use it to improve their lives.”

understanding the shift

Harold Jarche

“If you want a natively digital nation, or a state, or a city, or whatever, my message today is you actually need to be bold enough to create some new institutions; institutions that are of the internet, not on the internet.” ” — Making Government as a Platform Real.

serendipitous finds

Harold Jarche

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. haymarketbooks — “No human being is illegal.” ” Prof. Jason Stanley — Three Essential Facets of Fascism.

understanding leadership

Harold Jarche

My introduction to leadership came fairly early, as I was in Army Cadets and took my first leadership course at age fourteen. Every Summer through high school I would go to Cadet camp, with other boys who looked, acted, and sounded like me.

contradictions and creative desperation

Harold Jarche

In my last post on continuous learning for collaboration , I mentioned that one of the primary reasons to promote learning at work is because it is directly linked to innovation. Gary Klein examined 120 case studies and in, Seeing What Others Don’t , identified five ways that we gain insight.

PKM 206

adapting to constant change

Harold Jarche

Perpetual Beta. The future of [human] work is perpetual beta : adapting to constant change while still getting things done. “Basically: technological innovation and artificial intelligence are going to accelerate at a pace we’ve yet to really comprehend.

Change 182

helping make the network smarter

Harold Jarche

In what is likely the best example of my mantra that ‘work is learning and learning is the work’, Nokia’s CEO Risto Siilasmaa describes how he learned about machine learning because everyone was talking about it but he still did not understand it enough to describe it.

toward distributed governance

Harold Jarche

Last year I wrote a post — cities & the future of work — as an introduction to my session with the Prime Minister’s Office of Finland.

post-modernity: a way-station to the future

Harold Jarche

The TIMN Model describes how people have organized through history — first we lived as Tribes, then Institutions (church & state) dominated, and now Markets reign supreme. Each new form did not obsolesce the previous ones, but did change them.

not the news

Harold Jarche

Every fortnight (or so) I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. white_owly — “If you’re looking for obscene wealth it can usually be found right beside obscene poverty.”

News 156

how professionals learn for work

Harold Jarche

Jane Hart has been asking her readers what are the most useful/valuable ways that they learn for or at work.

creative economy entrepreneurs

Harold Jarche

The co-founders of Creative Startups have published a book that is a guide for anyone interested in the creative economy at any level — Creative Economy Entrepreneurs. This book is a good read but it is more of text book, sprinkled with anecdotes and data, than a single narrative.

continuous learning for collaboration

Harold Jarche

For the eleventh consecutive year, Jane Hart has polled thousands of respondents and asked what are their Top Tools for Learning. I contributed my own list of tools once again this year. In addition to the extensive list, complete with Jane’s observations and insights, she provides an interesting look at ten of the emerging trends. I find two of the trends of significant interest. Learning at work is becoming personal and continuous.

complexity & chaos — the new normal

Harold Jarche

A major challenge I have had in my organizational change work is getting people to understand that complicated environments are different from complex ones, and the latter are almost always the situation when people are involved.

learning as we work

Harold Jarche

In an essay on cognitive coaching , Gary Klein recommends six mind shifts that trainers can use to help improve cognitive skills. From criticism to curiosity. From following procedures to gaining tacit knowledge. From getting through the material to encouraging curiosity.

PKM 163

our future is networked and feminine

Harold Jarche

TIMN is an explanatory model of how human societies have organized: first in Tribes, later with Institutions added (T+I), and in our current society where Markets dominate (T+I+M).

podcasts

Harold Jarche

I have been encouraged by several people over the years to start podcasting. So far, I prefer blogging as my main public sense-making platform, but I am open to be interviewed or have a discussion on other people’s podcasts. Two podcasts done in the last year were: Teaching in Higher Ed.

Skills 147

autonomy, competence, relevance

Harold Jarche

If we seek diverse or divergent views, will the opinions of others change our minds? A recent study seems to indicate that paying attention to views opposed to our own may actually harden our existing perspectives.

Study 172

the frontiers of our knowledge

Harold Jarche

I was asked to contribute to an article in CIO magazine — The CIO’s Dilemma: Innovate AND Cut Costs. The question was how can CIO’s preserve their organization’s ability to innovate in the face of budget cuts? My response was relatively simple. “To

business schools are a technology of the last century

Harold Jarche

Our dominant models of how we organize and work as a society are fundamentally changing as we transition from an Information-Market economy to a Creative-Network economy. Charles Green succinctly explained the order in which this transition happens: “Ideas lead technology.

a compass for the future of work

Harold Jarche

There is little doubt that automation, by machines and software, is replacing human work and putting many current jobs at risk. How this will happen is uncertain, as an MIT Technology Review analysis of various projections shows a wide discrepancy. For example Forrester expects the US to lose 13.8M

Sample 238

humans working socially

Harold Jarche

A lot of traditional human work is getting automated , by machines or software. routine cognitive work is declining. manufacturing production in the USA is increasing but jobs are not. even the banking sector may see a 30% job reduction. for example, Nordea Bank just cut its workforce in half.

curious and fractal

Harold Jarche

Some people seem to be naturally curious. Others work at it. Some just lack interest in learning. You can notice this when traveling. Some people can describe many aspects of their local vicinity while others don’t know anything about why certain features exist.

questioning technology

Harold Jarche

Automation plus the current version of corporate capitalism is creating the perfect storm for those of us commonly known as labour. Most companies and labour laws are structured around an industrial model of capital and labour.

the agile sensemaking model

Harold Jarche

“Research shows that teams will organize themselves in different ways in response to how different types of complexity strains their sensemaking capacities. In order to increase their sensemaking potential, teams will reorganize their relationships in recognizable ways.

learning for the next industrial revolution

Harold Jarche

Jesse Martin has posted a good article on Learning in the Fourth Industrial Revolution , the era many say we are entering. It appears to be an era driven by “cyber-physical systems” So what will the new learning systems look like in this era?

automation + capitalism = a perfect storm

Harold Jarche

I have often discussed the automation of work here and how we need to focus our development and education efforts on developing human competencies that cannot be done by software or machines. But is automation really the major cause of workplace disruption?

Skills 214

staying alive in the modern world

Harold Jarche

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. “I’m convinced that people think freelancers have their lives funded by some kind of freelancing fairy, and that invoices are therefore an exercise in comedy.”

Skills 156

what they don’t teach at university, but should

Harold Jarche

Even after four years of study, many students leave their institutions of higher learning only to find themselves inadequately prepared for what is next. University graduates often go on to get a certificate in an applied area in hopes of getting a job.

PKM 205

‘we’re living in a very liquid world’

Harold Jarche

When I think back. On all the crap I learned in high school. It’s a wonder. I can think at all. And though my lack of education. Hasn’t hurt me none. I can read the writing on the wall. Paul Simon, Kodachrome (1973). Nothing that you learned in school has prepared you for today. Nothing.

actionable insights

Harold Jarche

I concluded a few years back that rates based on time at work only help to put you into a pigeon hole so that HR and Purchasing can easily classify you. Knowledge professionals are not pigeons. I have noticed a tendency over the past decade to push wages and fees down.

seeing the figure through the ground

Harold Jarche

Models can give us a place to start to have a conversation in order to develop shared understanding. Mental models are one of the five disciplines of a learning organization, according to Peter Senge.

Nordic leadership in times of extreme change

Harold Jarche

Return of the Vikings. I have had the privilege of working with several Nordic organizations over the past few years — Carlsberg , HR Norge , Implement Consulting , Snow Software , Prime Minister’s Office of Finland.

Change 185

learning to create the future of work

Harold Jarche

I recently wrote that when we look at the future of work, the loss of current jobs, and the effects of automation we should use a compass to guide us, not a list of what the jobs of the future may look like. These kinds of maps get dated too quickly.

PKM 215

ask the difficult questions

Harold Jarche

“Weak human + machine + better process was superior to a strong computer alone and, more remarkably, superior to a strong human + machine + inferior process.” Garry Kasparov. The future of work will be humans augmented by machines, and those with the best processes will succeed.

from modernity to meta-modernity

Harold Jarche

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. “I should have followed Ni Kuang’s process for doing work. Get paid first, deliver on time but absolutely no rewrites. That’s your business. Genius.”

trust emerges

Harold Jarche

Paul Zak discovered eight key factors, or principles, in promoting trust in the workplace. In The Neuroscience of Trust he describes the research over several years that yielded these insights and gives examples of companies who implement these principles.

to know is to do

Harold Jarche

Do we really understand tacit knowledge? asks Haridimos Tsoukas in a 2002 paper. He bases his position on the work of Michael Polanyi in that all knowledge is personal and all knowing is through action.

PKM 172