David Weinberger

Three Chaotic podcasts

David Weinberger

My book Everyday Chaos launched last week. As part of the launch, I gave some talks and interviews. Here are three of the conversations, three three great interviewers: Leonard Lopate, WBAI Hidden Forces podcast Berkman Klein book talk, and conversation with Joi Ito

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Fake news, harassment, and the robot threat: Some numbers

David Weinberger

Lee Rainie, of Pew Research, is giving a talk at a small pre-conference event I’m at. I’m a Lee Rainie and Pew Lifetime Fan. DISCLAIMERS: These are just some points Lee made. I undoubtedly left out important qualifiers. I’m sure I got things wrong, too. If I were on a connection that got more than […

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test. please ignore

David Weinberger

this is a test

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[iab] Robert Scoble

David Weinberger

I’m at a IAB conference in Toronto. The first speaker is Robert Scoble , who I haven’t seen since the early 2000s. He’s working at Upload VR that gives him “a front row seat on what’s coming.” ” WARNING : Live blogging. Not spellpchecking before posting.

Second debate: The wordclouds

David Weinberger

Here are wordclouds, generated by WordClouds , for the entire debate last night, and for Clinton and Trump. Here’s the transcript. By the way, according to the tool at Planetcalc , Trump used 1,162 unique words; Clinton used 1,242. According to Readability-Score , Trump spoke at a 7.6

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Forbes on 4 lessons from Everyday Chaos

David Weinberger

Joe McKendrick at Forbes has posted a concise and thoughtful column about Everyday Chaos, including four rules to guide your expectations about machine learning. It’s great to see a pre-publication post so on track about what the book says and how it applies to business

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[liveblog][PAIR] Rebecca Fiebrink on how machines can create new things

David Weinberger

At the PAIR symposium , Rebecca Fiebrink of Goldsmiths University of London asks how machines can create new things. NOTE: Live-blogging. Getting things wrong. Missing points. Omitting key information. Introducing artificial choppiness. Over-emphasizing small matters. Paraphrasing badly.

From the collection of…to your local library

David Weinberger

Here’s a sticker I’d like to see inside a book sometime: Let’s say you buy a paper version of a current best-selling book. You read it. You want to have it on your shelf, but you know you’re not going to re-read it for a while. So, why not lend it to your local library?

[bkc] Hate speech on Facebook

David Weinberger

I’m at a Very Special Harvard Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society Tuesday luncheon featuring Monika Bickert , Facebook’s Head of Global Policy Management in conversation with Jonathan Zittrain. Monika is in charge of what types of content can be shared on FB, how advertisers and developer interact with the site, and FB’s response to terrorist content.

Wikipedia is too hard: A suggestion

David Weinberger

Frequently we consult encyclopedias because a concept came up in conversation or something we’re reading, and we need to know just enough about it to be able to move on. But it seems to me that more and more frequently Wikipedia’s explanations are too hard and too detailed for this.

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Biblioteca Malatestiana – The world’s oldest public library

David Weinberger

I’m in Cesena, Italy for the first holding of the Web Economic Forum. Because I’m only here for a day, I didn’t bother to look up the local attractions until I arrived this afternoon. At TripAdvisor, the #1 Attraction is the Biblioteca Malatestiana , so I walked there. (It

Municipal nets, municipal electric power, and learning from history

David Weinberger

The debate over whether municipalities should be allowed to provide Internet access has been heating up. Twenty states ban it. Tom Wheeler, the chair of the FCC, has said he wants to “ preempt ” those laws. Congress is maneuvering to extend the ban nationwide.

Making library miscellaneousness awesome

David Weinberger

Sitterwerk Art Library in St. Gallen, Switzerland, has 19,000 publicly-accessible items on its shelves in no particular order. This video explains why that is a brilliant approach. And then the story just gets better and better. Werkbank from Astrom / Zimmer on Vimeo.

[liveblog][PAIR] Hae Won Park on living with AI

David Weinberger

At the PAIR conference, Hae Won Park of the MIT Media Lab is talking abiut personal social robots for home. NOTE: Live-blogging. Getting things wrong. Missing points. Omitting key information. Introducing artificial choppiness. Over-emphasizing small matters. Paraphrasing badly.

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My morning paranoia: Bernie’s scream moment

David Weinberger

My fear is that Bernie Sanders is going to have a bad moment during the upcoming debate, and the media will seize on it to make him look unfit for the presidency. I fear this because I’ve seen it happen before. Remember the 2004 Dean Scream?

Micah Sifry: Why the Net’s effect on politics has disappointed us

David Weinberger

This is a liveblog of Micah Sifry’s book talk hosted by the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University. It is not a perfect transcript of the event.

Joining Reddit

David Weinberger

Reddit is in flames. I can only see one way out of it that preserves the site’s unique value. I say this as an old man who loves Reddit despite being way outside its main demographic. Of course there are outrageously objectionable subreddits—topical discussion boards—but you don’t have to visit those. Reddit at its best is wonderful. Inspiring, even. It is a self-regulated set of communities that is capable of great collective insight, humor, and kindness. (At

Facebook provides more this-like-that instead of this-oh-that! (Or relevancy, interestingingness, and serendipity)

David Weinberger

Facebook has announced that it’s going to start adding to your newsfeed stories that you don’t know about but that are on the same topic as ones you follow.

Restoring the Network of Bloggers

David Weinberger

It’s good to have Hoder — Hossein Derakhshan — back. After spending six years in an Iranian jail, his voice is stronger than ever. The changes he sees in the Web he loves are distressingly real. Hoder was in the cohort of early bloggers who believed that blogs were how people were going to find their voices and themselves on the Web. (I I tried to capture some of that feeling in a post a year and a half ago.)

Adblockers are not pirates

David Weinberger

Mathew Ingram tweeted : Currently arguing with someone over whether ad blocking is ethically the same as music piracy. I’m arguing it’s not. Any thoughts, Twitter? Mathew Ingram (@mathewi) September 18, 2015. No, it is not. (Of Of course, talking about the illegal sharing of music as “piracy” is ridiculous, as would be obvious to anyone who’s ever met an actual, non-arrrrr pirate. Which I have not.). Is turning a page in a magazine without reading the ad piracy?

[2b2k] Back when not every question had an answer

David Weinberger

Let me remind you young whippersnappers what looking for knowledge was like before the Internet (or “hiphop” as I believe you call it). Cast your mind back to 1982, when your Mommy and Daddy weren’t even gleams in each other’s eyes.

Future of libraries, Kenya style

David Weinberger

This video will remind you, if you happen to have forgotten, what libraries mean to much of the world: Internet, mesh, people eager to learn, the same people eager to share. A future for libraries. You can contribute here

Chief Philosophical Officer

David Weinberger

It had to be back in 1993 that I had dual cards at Interleaf. But it was only a couple of days ago that I came across them. Yes, for a couple of years I was both VP of Strategic Marketing and Chief Philosophical Officer at Interleaf.

Socrates in a Raincoat

David Weinberger

In 1974, the prestigious scholarly journal TV Guide published my original research that suggested that the inspector in Dostoyevsky’s Crime and Punishment was modeled on Socrates.

The future is a platform

David Weinberger

Here’s the video of my talk at The Next Web in Amsterdam on Friday. I haven’t watched it because I don’t like watching me and neither should you. But I would be interested in your comments about what I’m feeling my way toward in this talk.

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[2b2k] Inside.com’s updates: A new rhetorical form for journalism?

David Weinberger

Inside.com is working hard to take the Web down a notch — the notch where, say, an announcement by NASA that they’ve discovered a possibly habitable planet in another galaxy gets the headline “Scientists find another Earth…and you won’t believe what it’s going to do to the value of your home!”.

The Keynesian Marketplace of Ideas

David Weinberger

The awesome Tim Hwang (disclosure: I am a complete fanboy) has posted an essay. arguing that we should take something like a Keynesian approach to the “marketplace of ideas” that we were promised with the Internet. I think there’s something really helpful about this, but that ultimately the metaphor gets in the way of itself.

Republicans suggest shockingly sensible ideas for reforming copyright

David Weinberger

A Republican Study Committee has posted a document (as a pdf ) that nails three myths about copyright law and suggests four areas of reform. The 3 myths are: The purpose of copyright is to compensate the creator of the content. Copyright is free market capitalism at work.

Cymbeline: Shakespeare’s worst play (Or: Lordy, I hope there’s a tape)

David Weinberger

The hosts of the BardCast podcast consider Cymbeline to probably be Shakespeare’s worst play. Not enough happens in the first two acts, the plot is kuh-razy, it’s a mishmash of styles and cultures, and it over-explains itself time and time again. That podcast is far from alone in thinking that it’s the Bard’s worst, although, as BardCast says, even the Bard’s worst is better than just about anything.

Library as a platform: Chattanooga

David Weinberger

I finally got to see the Chattanooga Library. It was even better than I’d expected. In fact, you can see the future of libraries emerging there. That’s not to say that you can simply list what it’s doing and do the same things and declare yourself the Library of the Future. Rather, Chattanooga Library has turned itself into a platform. That’s where the future is, not in the particular programs and practices that happen to emerge from that platform.

The Blogosphere lives!

David Weinberger

There was a reason we used that ridiculous word to refer to the loose collection of bloggers: Back in the early 2000s, we were reading one another’s blogs, responding to them, and linking to them. Blogging was a conversational form made solid by links. It’s time to get back to that. At least for me. Tweeting’s great. I love Twitter. And I love the weird conversational form it enables.

A civic-minded man

David Weinberger

I was walking on the street in front of Wheelock College today when I saw an elderly man, nicely dressed, stopping as he walked along to pick up the plastic bags stuck in the shrubbery. “Thank you,” I said as I passed by him. It was Mike Dukakis , whom you might remember from such projects as being the former governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the Democratic Presidential candidate who ran against George Bush the Senior. He chatted me up: My name, what I do, etc.

Jeff Jarvis on journalism as a service

David Weinberger

My wife and I had breakfast with Jeff Jarvis on Thursday, so I took the opportunity to do a quick podcast with him about his new book Geeks Bearing Gifts: Imagining New Futures for News. I like the book a lot. It proposes that we understand journalism as a provider of services rather than of content.

Italy’s Declaration of Internet Rights

David Weinberger

An ad hoc study commission of the Italian Chamber of Deputies has published a draft “Declaration of Internet Rights” that should be cause for cheers and cheer. It’s currently open for public comment at the Civici Platform — which by itself is pretty cool. TechPresident explains that this came about.

Et tu, U2?

David Weinberger

A few days ago, when Apple pushed the latest from U2 into everyone’s iTunes library, you could hear the Internet pause as it suddenly realized that Apple is its parents’ age.

Fun fact – Impressionist edition

David Weinberger

According to Ross King’s excellent The Judgment of Paris , there was a day in the summer of 1874 when Manet showed up at Monet’s home and painted The Manet Family in their Garden at Argenteuil , a scene of Manet’s wife and daughter, and him puttering around in the garden.

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[liveblog][PAIR] Jess Holbrook

David Weinberger

I’m at the PAIR conference at Google. Jess Holbrook is UX lead for AI. He’s talking about human-centered machine learning. NOTE: Live-blogging. Getting things wrong. Missing points. Omitting key information. Introducing artificial choppiness. Over-emphasizing small matters.

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[lliveblog][PAIR] Antonio Torralba on machine vision, human vision

David Weinberger

At the PAIR Symposium, Antonio Torralba asks why image identification has traditionally gone so wrong. NOTE: Live-blogging. Getting things wrong. Missing points. Omitting key information. Introducing artificial choppiness. Over-emphasizing small matters. Paraphrasing badly.

[liveblog][PAIR] Doug Eck on creativity

David Weinberger

At the PAIR Symposium , Doug Eck , a research scientist at Google Magenta , begins by playing a video: Douglas Eck – Transforming Technology into Art from Future Of StoryTelling on Vimeo. Magenta is part of Google Brain that explores creativity. By the way: NOTE: Live-blogging. Getting things wrong.

[liveblog][pair] Golan Levin

David Weinberger

At the PAIR Symposium , Golan Levin of CMU is talking about ML and art. NOTE: Live-blogging. Getting things wrong. Missing points. Omitting key information. Introducing artificial choppiness. Over-emphasizing small matters. Paraphrasing badly. Not running a spellpchecker.

Spoilers and Time

David Weinberger

I remember a 1971 National Lampoon article that gave away the endings of a hundred books and movies. Wikipedia and others think that article might have been the first use of the term “spoiler.”

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Why I hate the Windows 10 ad

David Weinberger

A close relative recently gushed about the Windows 10 ad with the montage of adorable toddlers, especially the boy (?) pressing his face up against a window. My reaction was visceral, guttural, and not for polite company. Until then I hadn’t realized how much I hate that ad.

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Library as starting point

David Weinberger

A new report on Ithaka S+R ‘s annual survey of libraries suggests that library directors are committed to libraries being the starting place for their users’ research, but that the users are not in agreement. This then calls into question the expenditures libraries make to achieve that goal. Hat tip to Carl Straumsheim and Peter Suber.). The questioning is good.