Clark Quinn

Emerging Online Learning Tools Research Session Mindmap

Clark Quinn

At AECT18, I dropped in on a session summarizing research on emerging technologies for online learning. There were experts in each area, so names like Vanessa Dennan on social media, Curt Bonk in MOOCs, Florence Martin on synchronous Learning, and David Wiley on Open Education Research.

Developing learning to learn skills

Clark Quinn

I’m an advocate of meta-learning, that is: learning to learn. Not just because it’s personally empowering, but because it can and should be organizationally empowering. The problem is, little is talked about how to develop it. And I have to say that what I do see, seems inadequate.

Skills 183

Making Multiple Choice work

Clark Quinn

For sins in my past, I’ve been thinking about assessments a bit lately. And one of the biggest problems comes from trying to find solutions that are meaningful yet easy to implement. You can ask learners to develop meaningful artifacts, but getting them assessed at scale is problematic.

And the myths go on

Clark Quinn

Yet another silly post I stumbled upon. And last week at a conf someone said they liked my take-downs. If you disagree, let me know, but otherwise here’s yet another bunch of marketing hype. Hopefully no one uses this for any real decisions!

Jessica Kriegel #DevLearn Keynote Mindmap

Clark Quinn

Jessica Kriegel closed DevLearn with a witty and wise presentation taking apart the ‘generations’ and ‘millennial’ myths. In short, it’s basically age discrimination. Don’t do it! The post Jessica Kriegel #DevLearn Keynote Mindmap appeared first on Learnlets

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Content Confusion

Clark Quinn

I read, again and again, about the importance of ‘content’ in learning. And I don’t disagree, but…I think there’s still a problem about it. And where I get concerned is about what is meant by the term. Just what do mean by ‘content’?

Why Myths Matter

Clark Quinn

I’ve called out a number of myths (and superstitions, and misconceptions) in my latest tome , and I’m grateful people appear to be interested. I take this as a sign that folks are beginning to really pay attention to things like good learning design. And that’s important.

Competencies and Innovation?

Clark Quinn

This may seem like an odd pairing, so bear with me. I believe that we want to find ways to support organizations moving in the direction of innovation and learning cultures. Of course, I’ve been on a pretty continuous campaign for this, but I’m wondering what other levers we have.

Constraints on activities

Clark Quinn

When we design learning activities (per the activity-based learning model ), ideally we’re looking to create an integration of a number of constraints around that assignment. I was looking to enumerate them, and (of course) I tried diagramming it.

Another Day Another Myth-Ridden Hype Piece

Clark Quinn

Some days, it feels like I’m playing whack-a-mole. I got an email blast from an org (need to unsubscribe) that included a link that just reeked of being a myth -ridden piece of hype. So I clicked, and sure enough! And, as part of my commitment to showing my thinking, I’m taking it down.

Intellectricity

Clark Quinn

Many years ago, I met a guy who worked for Apple. They were allowed to have their own job titles, and his was “Intellectrician” I thought that was a very nice turn of phrase.

Engagement

Clark Quinn

In a meeting today, I was asked “how do you define engagement”, and I found it an intriguing question. I don’t know that I have a definition so much as steps to enhance it. Still, it made me think. What engagement is not, let’s be clear, is tarting content up.

Processing

Clark Quinn

I’ve been thinking a lot about processing in learning of late; what processing matters, when, and why. I thought I’d share my thinking with you and see what you think. This is my processing! :). We know processing is useful.

Microlearning Malarkey

Clark Quinn

Someone pointed me to a microlearning post, wondering if I agreed with their somewhat skeptical take on the article. And I did agree with the skepticism. Further, it referenced another site with worse implications. And I think it’s instructive to take these apart.

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ONE level of exaggeration

Clark Quinn

I’ve argued before that we should be thinking about exaggeration in our learning design. And I’ve noticed that it’s a dramatic trick in popular media. But you can easily think of ways it can go wrong. So what would be appropriate exaggeration?

Wise technology?

Clark Quinn

At a recent event, they were talking about AI (artificial intelligence) and DI (decision intelligence). And, of course, I didn’t know what the latter was so it was of interest.

Reading List?

Clark Quinn

I saw another query about ‘reading list recommendations’ (e.g. as an addition to Millennials, Goldfish, Other Training Misconceptions ;), and I thought I’d weigh in, with a different spin. What qualifies what books should you read? Maybe your level of expertise?

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Realities: Why AR over VR

Clark Quinn

In the past, I’ve alluded to why I like Augmented Reality (AR) over Virtual Reality. And in a conversation this past week, I talked about realities a bit more, and I thought I’d share. Don’t get me wrong, I like VR alot , but I think AR has the bigger potential impact.

Cost 181

Labels, models, and drives

Clark Quinn

In my post last week on engagement , I presented the alignment model from my Engaging Learning book on designing learning experiences. And as I thought about the post, I pondered several related things about labels, models, and drives.

Are Decisions the Key?

Clark Quinn

A number of years ago, now, Brenda Sugrue posited that Bloom’s Taxonomy was wrong. And, she proposed a simpler framework. I’ve never been a fan of Bloom’s; folks have trouble applying it systematically (reliably discriminating between various levels).

Revisiting personal learning

Clark Quinn

A number of years ago, I tried a stab at an innovation process. And I was reminded of it thinking about personal learning, and looked at it again. And it doesn’t seem to aged well. So I thought I’d revisit the model, and see what emerged.

Labels and roles

Clark Quinn

I was just reflecting on the different job labels there are. Some of the labels are trendy, some are indicative, but there’s potentially a lot of overlap. I’m not sure what to do about it, but I thought I’d explore it.

Translational research?

Clark Quinn

I came across the phrase “Translational Behavior-Analysis” I had no idea what that was, so I looked it up. And I found the answer interesting. The premise is that this is an intermediary between academic and applied work. Which I think of as a good thing, but is it really a thing ?

Example Diagram

Clark Quinn

No, not a diagram that’s an example, a diagram about examples! I created this because I needed a diagram to represent examples. I’ve written about them, and I have diagrams for other components of learning like models. However, I wanted to capture some important points about examples.

Designing with science

Clark Quinn

How should we design? It’s all well and good to spout principles, but putting them into practice is another thing. While we always would like to follow learning science, there’re not always all the answers we need.

Design 189

Organizational Psychology?

Clark Quinn

I read an article calling for organizational psychology and the things these folks do for companies. And, interestingly, many of the tasks seem like things that I’ve been calling for L&D to do. So now I have to ask what’s the relationship between these two areas?

Barack Obama #ATD2018 Keynote Mindmap

Clark Quinn

The official opening event to kickoff ATD’s International Conference, was our 44th President, Barack Obama. Prompted by questions from Tony Bingham, he eloquently addressed education, values, and more. Thoughtful, witty, and ultimately wise, an inspiring session.

Top 10 Learning Tools 2018

Clark Quinn

Every year of late, Jane Hart has polled about people’s top 10 learning tools. From this, she creates a list of the top 100 learning tools. It’s a fun and valuable exercise, so as usual I’ll weigh in with mine (in no particular order).

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Why L&D Should Lead

Clark Quinn

So, I’ve seen a bright future for L&D. It’s possible, and desirable. But is it defensible? I want to suggest that it is.

A solid education platform

Clark Quinn

In the past couple of days, I’ve come across two different initiatives to improve education. And certainly our education system can stand improvement. However, each one had the same major flaw, and leaves open an opportunity for improvement not to occur.

Post popularity?

Clark Quinn

My colleague, Will Thalheimer, asked what posts were most popular (if you blog, you can participate too). For complicated reasons, I don’t have Google Analytics running. However, I found I have a WordPress plugin called Page Views. It helpfully can list my posts by number of guest views.

Mental models are the agents of learning

Clark Quinn

I was talking with my friend and colleague Harold Jarche about how he’s expanding his valuable Personal Knowledge Mastery to teams and at the organizational level. Walking through his diagram, what is critical, what is being exchanged, are mental models.

Cognitive and Learning Sciences

Clark Quinn

You’ll see a lot of vendors/sessions/webinars touting neuroscience or brain-based. And you really shouldn’t believe it. Yes, our brains are composed of neurons, and we do care about what we know about brains. BUT, these aren’t the right terms!

Diagramming Microlearning

Clark Quinn

I’ll be giving an upcoming webinar where I make my case for defining microlearning. And, as part of my usual wrestling with clarity, I created a diagram. I thought I’d share it with you. What, you want me to walk you through it?

Complex thinking

Clark Quinn

An interesting article I came across brings up an interesting issue: how do we do complex thinking? Are some people just better at it? The short answer appears to be ‘no’ Instead, a couple of tools play a role, and I think it’s an interesting excursion.

It’s here!

Clark Quinn

So, as you ( should ) know, I’ve written a book debunking learning myths. Of course, writing it, and getting your mitts on it are two different things!

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Situated Cognition

Clark Quinn

In a recent article , I wrote about three types of cognition that are changing how we think about how we think (how meta!). All are interesting, but they also have implications for understanding for supporting us in doing things.

Mobile Malarkey

Clark Quinn

I was called out on a tweet pointing to an article on mobile. And, I have to say, I thought it was pretty underwhelming. It was the ‘old school’ view of mlearning, and I think that the post largely missed the point. So I thought it’d be valuable to walk through the claims.

Silly Design

Clark Quinn

Time for a brief rant on interface designs. Here we’re talking about two different situations, one device, and and one interface. And, hopefully, we can extract some lessons, because these are just silly design decisions. First up is our timer. And it’s a good timer, and gets lots of use.

Design 173

New and improved evaluation

Clark Quinn

A few years ago, I had a ‘debate’ with Will Thalheimer about the Kirkpatrick model (you can read it here ). In short, he didn’t like it, and I did, for different reasons. However, the situation has changed, and it’s worth revisiting the issue of evaluation.

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Busting Myths!

Clark Quinn

As I have hinted, I’ve been working on a project that is related to what learning science has to do with learning design. And I can finally announce the project! I’ve been writing a book on debunking learning myths & superstitions, and unpacking some misconceptions.

Context is key

Clark Quinn

Workflow learning is one of the new buzzphrases. The notion is that you deliver learning to the point of need, instead of taking people away from the workflow. And I’m a fan. But it’s not as easy as it sounds! Context is a critical issue in making this work, and that’s non-trivial.

Designing a game

Clark Quinn

When I was a young academic in Australia, a colleague asked me if I would talk to some folks about a game. He knew that I had designed games before returning to grad school, and had subsequently done one on my thesis research.

Design 174