Clark Quinn

Skills, competencies, and moving forward

Clark Quinn

I was asked, recently, about skills versus competencies. The context was an individual who saw orgs having competency frameworks, but only focusing on skill development. The question was where the focus should be. And I admit I had to look up the difference first!

Skills 217

What is wrong with (higher) education?

Clark Quinn

I was having a conversation with a colleague, sparked by dropping enrollments in unis. Not surprisingly, we ended up talking about flaws in higher education. He suggested that they don’t get it, and I agreed. He was thinking that they get the tech, but not the learning.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Learning science again

Clark Quinn

In an earlier post, I made a defense of cognitive psychology (really, to me, cognitive science, a bigger umbrella). And, previously, the case for learning science. And I’m coming at learning science again, with a personal interest.

Price 211

Personalized and adaptive learning

Clark Quinn

For reasons that are unclear even to me, I was thinking about personalized versus adaptive learning. They’re similar in some ways, but also different. And a way to distinguish them occurred to me.

Learner-centered, or…

Clark Quinn

I saw a post the other day that talked about ’empathy’, and I’m strongly supportive. But along the way they cited another topic that I’ve had mixed feelings about. So I thought it was time to address it. I’m wondering about ‘learner-centered’, and it may seem churlish to suggest otherwise. However, let me make the case for an alternative.

Addressing fear in learning

Clark Quinn

One of my mantras in ‘make it meaningful ‘ is that there’re three things to do. And one of those was kind of a toss away, until a comment in a conversation with a colleague brought it home. So here’s a first take at addressing fear in learning.

The case for learning science

Clark Quinn

In a perfect world, we’d spend all the time we want on learning. However, we don’t live in that world, we live in the real world. Which means our decisions are about tradeoffs. Which means we have to evaluate the case for paying attention to research.

Cost 221

In Defense of Cognitive Psychology

Clark Quinn

A recent Donald Clark post generated an extension from Stephen Downes. I respect both of these folks as people and as intellects, but while I largely agreed with one, I had a challenge with the other. So here’s a response, in defense of cognitive psychology. The caveat is that my Ph.D.

Mythless Learning Design

Clark Quinn

If I’m going to rail against myths in learning, it makes sense to be clear about what learning design without myths looks like. Let me lay out a little of what mythless learning design is, or should be. Learning with myths manifests in many ways.

Design 215

Thinking Transformation

Clark Quinn

This pandemic has led to everyone scrambling to work digitally. And it’s not really a transformation (which shouldn’t be ‘digital first’), but rather just ‘move what we do online’. And that’s understandable. Over time, however, I think we want to shift our mindset.

Top 10 Tools for Learning 2020

Clark Quinn

It’s time, once again, for Jane Hart’s excellent Top 10 Tools for Learning survey. And, so, it’s time once again for my reflections. Here are my take on the top 10 tools that support my learning. The first way I learn is to process what I’ve seen.

Tools 185

The plusses and minuses of learning science research

Clark Quinn

A person who I find quite insightful (and occasionally inciteful ;) is Donald Clark. He built and sold Epic, an elearning company, and now he leads a learning AI company, Wildfire.

Unpacking collaboration and cooperation?

Clark Quinn

My colleague, Harold Jarche ( the PKM guy), has maintained that cooperation is of more value than collaboration. And for good reason, because cooperation comes from internal motivation instead of external direction.

The case for gated submissions

Clark Quinn

Twice out of three recent opportunities, I’ve been thwarted from my intentions by platform capabilities. And, once, I was supported. But this capability is so basic and so valuable, I thought I’d make the argument. So here I’m making the case for gated submissions.

A heuristic approach to motivation

Clark Quinn

I’ve been pondering more about curiosity and ‘making it meaningful’ and how we might work on motivation to make learning truly meaningful. I’v come up with a rough cut. So, here’s a proposal for a heuristic approach to motivation.

Curious about Curiosity

Clark Quinn

When you’re looking into motivation, particularly for learning, certain elements get mentioned again and again. So I’ve heard ‘relevance’, ‘ meaningfulness ‘, consequences, and more. Friston suggests that we learn to minimize surprise.

Losing our collective minds?

Clark Quinn

So, after that mess on Twitter, I next see on LinkedIn a recognized personage who proceeds to claim that learning styles are legit. And, the basis for this claim is fundamentally wrong. So I’m beginning to fear that we’re losing our collective minds! Let me be clear about the claim, the problem, and a healthy approach. The claim started like this: I know there is a huge camp of folks who say no one has learning styles and they provide all types of links of others who concur.

Practicing the Preach

Clark Quinn

I’m working on my next plan for global domination. And as I do, I’ve been developing my thinking, and there are some interesting outcomes. Including a realization that I wasn’t doing what I usually recommend.

Authentic Marketing

Clark Quinn

I’m not a marketing expert, or even a marketer, so take the following with the proverbial boulder of salt. Still, I have to market Quinnovation, and I’ve advised orgs on marketing (learning) products, and I’ve taken down a lot of bogus marketing.

Where are we going most wrong?

Clark Quinn

…and what’s most important to fix? I was a co-conspirator on the Serious eLearning Manifesto , and we identified 8 values that separated typical elearning from serious elearning. However, I suspect that not all are as important, nor hard to fix. And, thinking about what my unique contribution could and should be, I wondered where best to target my efforts to avoid going most wrong.

Getting Wiser

Clark Quinn

I’ve been interested in wisdom as a stretch goal. That is, if what I (and, ideally, we) do is help people become smarter, could we go further? Could we help people get wiser? Let’s be clear, I am not claiming that I am wise. Rather, thinking about what wisdom is and trying to be wise would be more accurate ;). It’s led me to look at wisdom quietly, as a background task. And, two recent articles provide a little insight about getting wiser.

Experimenting with conference design

Clark Quinn

As part of coping in this time of upheaval, I’m trying different things. Which isn’t new, but there seem to be more innovations to tap into. In addition to teaching a course on mobile learning, I’m one of the speakers at a new online event. And, what’s nice, is that they’re experimenting with conference design, not just moving straight online.

Thinking about reframing

Clark Quinn

I found something interesting, and wanted to share, but…I realize this is supposed to be about my learnings about learning. So, I’m framing it as thinking about reframing ;). Seriously, it’s about extant models and opportunities to rethink. So, to begin with, I’ve been somewhat frustrated with the traditional model of capitalism. No, not as a plea for communism or something, but because it doesn’t align with our brains.

Buy 139

Points of inflection

Clark Quinn

In a conversation the other day, I was asked about what’s needed, and what’s missing, in making the L&D revolution come to life. I’ve previously opined about the changes I think are necessary, but I realized that for folks making the change, there are hurdles. It occurred to me that there are some points of inflection that could make a difference. As I had previously suggested, it’s idiosyncratic.

Buy 153

Death to Zombies!

Clark Quinn

Last week, I ranted about a myth that seems inextinguishable. And I ran across another one in a place I shouldn’t have. And I keep seeing others, spotting them roaming around loose. Like zombies, they seem to rise from the dead. We need death to zombies. Particularly learning myth zombies! There are several that seem overly prolific. I’ve already ranted about learning styles , but it’s pernicious. And others keep cropping up.

More Marketing Myths

Clark Quinn

The other day a tweet caught my eye that used a myth to get you to click a link. Worse, clicking the link led to another myth. These are folks I think are generally good, and it seems that their actual offering made sense, but the approach does not. It’s just more marketing myths, drawing upon common misconstruals , and that’s not a good thing. I think it’s worth calling out.

Remote working expertise

Clark Quinn

More and more, we’re working from home. This has important implications for organizations figuring out how to make that time productive. What are the best source(s) for remote working expertise? Here’re my recommendations. I believe that applying the principles of cognitive science to how we think, work, and learn, is a good guide. There is lots know about how people are able to bring their best, alone and together.

Will we still need L&D?

Clark Quinn

In a document shared with me recently, there was this statement: “The assumption that there will always be a managed learning function” I find that interesting to contemplate. If we ever get better about developing self-learning skills in school or university (ideally the former), could we eliminate the need for organizational courses? E.g. will we still need L&D? The notion is that once folks are better at self-learning, the reason for organized courses could fade.

Skills 144

Myths, publishers, and confusion

Clark Quinn

On twitter the other day, I was asked how I could on one hand rail against myths, and on the other work with orgs who either sell or promote DiSC and MBTI. The problem, it appears, was a perception that I’m deeply involved with orgs that perpetuate the problem. I thought I’d try to clarify all this, and make sense of myths, publishers and confusion. The dialog started as a reaction to an article I pointed to on twitter.

Tools 132

Making learning meaningful?

Clark Quinn

So, last week, I asked the musical question: where are we going most wrong? I followed that up asking what most would help. I also suggested that I had my own answers. So I have answers for each. My answer for the first part, where we’re going wrong, is somewhat complex. But for the second, I’m thinking that the biggest opportunity is making learning meaningful. My thoughts… So, where we go most wrong is, to me, tied together.

Course 138

The roots of LXD

Clark Quinn

Instructional design, as is well documented, has it roots in meeting the needs for training in WWII. User experience (UX) came from the Human Computer Interaction (HCI) revolution towards User Centered Design. With a vibrant cross-fertilization of ideas, it’s natural that evolutions in one can influence the other (or not). It’s worth thinking about the trajectories and the intersections that are the roots of LXD, Learning eXperience Design.

On Diversity and Safety

Clark Quinn

I normally don’t speak on this blog outside of my focus on learning. That’s for other platforms. However, I can’t help notice; deaths, protests, abuse. And while I wrestle with what to say, I can’t in good conscious say nothing. And there is a connection: diversity and safety. I tout the evidence that diversity and safety are critical to the best outcomes, and that’s true beyond the workplace. It’s true for society as a whole.

Images processed 60K faster? No! And more…

Clark Quinn

Recently, I’ve run into the claim that images are processed 60K times faster than text. And, folks, it’s a myth. More over, it’s exemplary of bad practices in business. And so it’s worth pointing out what the situation is, why it’s happening, and why you should be on guard. It’s easy to find the myth. Just search on “images processed 60K times faster than text” You’ll get lots of citations, and a few debunkings.

A mlearning course?

Clark Quinn

As I mentioned in my last post , yes, I’ll be running a course on mobile learning. And I can understand if you’re thinking “a mlearning course?” ” So I thought I’d lay out the thinking a bit, and see if I can help you see why I’m doing this. So, I don’t usually do things just for money. I’ve turned down things I thought were inappropriate in the past.

Course 142

Blinded by the buzzword!

Clark Quinn

With any industry, a large quantity of buzzwords exist, and Learning & Development isn’t any different. Likewise, plusses and minuses accrue. It’s helpful to know the buzzword as well as the real meaning behind it, but how do you do this? Buzzwords can become vernacular. With a professional vocabulary, everyone has a shared understanding of what’s meant. It’s more efficient when concepts have short words or phrases that define them.

Wanna talk meaning, learning science, and more…?

Clark Quinn

The L&D conference , starting today, has a wide variety of things going on. I’m actually impressed, because in addition to the asynchronous and synchronous sessions I knew about, there are a number of other things going on. Including things I’m in. So, do you wanna talk meaning, learning science, and more…? Here’s when and how.

Two learning engineerings?

Clark Quinn

So, I’ve written before about ‘learning engineering’ And, separately, it’s become an issue just what the term means. It appears there are two ‘learning engineerings’, and the issue is how to resolve them. So, let’s look at the contenders. First, there’s the notion of engineering as applied science. We refer to chemical engineering as applied chemistry, electrical engineering as applied physics, etc.

Design 145

NOT Learning Engineering

Clark Quinn

I recently wrote about two different interpretations of the term ‘learning engineering’ So when I saw another article on the topic, I was keen to read it. Except, after reading it, I thought what it was talking about was not learning engineering, or, at least, not all of it. So what do I mean? I think this article goes wrong right from the title: Learning Engineering Is Learning About Learning. We Need That Now More Than Ever. And I’m a big fan of learning about learning!

Review 135

How I work

Clark Quinn

So, I work from home. A lot. And lots of folks are providing advice for those who have to make the shift in these interesting times. Rather than talk about what you should do, however, I thought I’d share what I do. So this is how I work. This is my workspace. That’s a convertible desk, so I can be standing or sitting. That varies depending on what I’m working on, how I feel, etc. I’ve an ergonomic chair for sitting, and a foam pad I slide out when I’m standing.

Emerging Online Learning Tools Research Session Mindmap

Clark Quinn

At AECT18, I dropped in on a session summarizing research on emerging technologies for online learning. There were experts in each area, so names like Vanessa Dennan on social media, Curt Bonk in MOOCs, Florence Martin on synchronous Learning, and David Wiley on Open Education Research. And I apparently missed the nuances in the description, it was more meta-research, e.g. research on the research!

An L&D Challenge?

Clark Quinn

A colleague and friend posted about masks, and I weighed in. He suggested that it’s really a learning issue. I’m not sure I agree, but I thought it might be interesting to explore. So here’s an L&D challenge to consider. First, masks make sense , scientifically. They reduce the chance that someone might contaminate someone else.

A little silliness

Clark Quinn

So, this was a little silliness I did in the 99 second presos at the Learning & Development Conference. It was the second one (the other was more aspirational). I’d put it together and then wasn’t sure, but there was time and space. It’s just for fun, nothing serious, along the lines of others I’ve done. FYA (allegro): Hi, I’m Dr. Quinn, Meaningful Man, and have I got solutions for you! We’ve got learning experiences that are certain to be new.

Shallow or Deep

Clark Quinn

I wrote about how I was frustrated with the lack of any decent learning expertise in too many vendors. And, lately I’ve been seeing more orgs making learning claims. Unrelated, of course, because it’s too soon. Still, are things improving? My experience suggests that it’s not yet quite the case. The problem is whether their learning expertise is shallow or deep. And, you can guess where this is going ;).