David Weinberger

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Informed consent for human sensors

David Weinberger

Friend (CEO at that same outfit) write about a project in which users of a health monitoring app have given informed consent to have their data made available to other researchers. How to get informed consent via an app? The post Informed consent for human sensors appeared first on Joho the Blog

Data 42

Information is the opposite of information

David Weinberger

The ordinary language use of “information” in some ways is the opposite of the technical sense given the term by Claude Shannon — the sense that kicked off the Information Age. ” The more surprising the news is, the more important the information is. “I got some information today.

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[2b2k] No, now that you mention it, we’re not overloaded with information

David Weinberger

On a podcast today, Mitch Joel asked me something I don’t think anyone else has: Are we experiencing information overload? That’s where I think we are with information overload. But it’s not Information Overload any more than the atmosphere is Air Overload. Information overload is so 1990s Including me.

[2b2k] Information overload? Not so much. (Part 2)

David Weinberger

Yesterday I tried to explain my sense that we’re not really suffering from information overload, while of course acknowledging that there is vastly more information out there than anyone could ever hope to master. We have been taught by our previous media that information is manageable.

[2b2k] [berkman] Alison Head on how students seek information

David Weinberger

Omitting key information. Project Information Literacy is a research project that reaches across institutions. NOTE: Live-blogging.

[2b2k] 13 reasons why the Britannica failed on paper

David Weinberger

Topics had to be consistently shrunk or discarded to make room for new information. In the straight-up match between paper and Web, the Encyclopedia Britannica lost. This was as close to a sure thing as we get outside of the realm of macro physics and Meryl Streep movies. Topics were confined to rectangles of text. All the links were broken.

Reddit and community journalism

David Weinberger

What’s interesting to a community is not enough to make us well informed because our community’s interests tend to be parochial and self-reinforcing. I’ve come to love Reddit. Reddit as it stands is not the future of news. It is, however, a hope for news. As at other sites, at Reddit readers post items they find interesting.

Aaron Swartz was not a hacker. He was a builder.

David Weinberger

He was a builder: Aaron helped build the RSS standard that enabled a rush of information and ideas — what we blandly call “content” — to be distributed, encountered, and re-distributed. Of course Aaron was a legendary prodigy of a hacker in the sense of someone who can build anything out of anything. Aaron was not a hacker.

[berkman] Anil Dash on “The Web We Lost”

David Weinberger

Omitting key information. Now, with the introduction of Adlinks and AdSense, Google transformed links from the informative and aesthetic, to an economic tool for SEO. Anil Dash is giving a Berkman lunchtime talk, titled “The Web We Lost.” NOTE: Live-blogging. Getting things wrong. Missing points. Paraphrasing badly.

[2b2k] Linking is a public good

David Weinberger

Mathew’s point is that linking is a good journalistic practice, even if author of the the second article independently confirmed the information in the first, as happened in this case. It is thus a stopping point in the ecology of information. They create a web that is increasingly rich, useful, diverse, and trustworthy.

News 86

Transparency is the new objectivity

David Weinberger

Nevertheless, objectivity — even as an unattainable goal — served an important role in how we came to trust information, and in the economics of newspapers in the modern age. We were told that bloggers have agendas, whereas journalists give us objective information. This change is, well, epochal. And then foolishness.

Report 109

Library as starting point

David Weinberger

These are all straightforward ways to start record and use information about the items the community has voted for with its library cards. This then calls into question the expenditures libraries make to achieve that goal. Hat tip to Carl Straumsheim and Peter Suber.). The questioning is good. Library platform s can help.

[2b2k] Attribution isn’t just about credit. It’s about networking knowledge.

David Weinberger

As the piece says about the Poynter Institute ‘s Kelly McBride : [McBride] struck another theme, echoed by other ethics experts: that providing such credit would have enabled readers to find other sources of information on the subject, especially through online links. “You get so much flak — these are difficult stories,” Ms.

Municipal nets, municipal electric power, and learning from history

David Weinberger

The debate over whether municipalities should be allowed to provide Internet access has been heating up. Twenty states ban it. Learn from history?

Noam Chomsky, security, and equivocal information

David Weinberger

It literally carries no information, even in the technical sense: it’s completely predictable and thus carries no info. I don’t doubt that the US security folks believe it, but it is without meaning. believe they are acting for the best of purposes. I am a little bit hung-up, however, on his equivocating on “information.”

[2b2k] Social Science in the Age of Too Big to Know

David Weinberger

” Gary also points to “the coming end of the quantitative-qualitative divide” in the social sciences, as new techniques enable massive amounts of qualitative data to be quantified, enriching purely quantitative data and extracting additional information from the qualitative reports. ” 3.

HyperCard@25

David Weinberger

TBL’s real genius was that he wrote protocols and standards by which hyperlinked information could be displayed and shared. Fun.).

[2b2k] Truth, knowledge, and not knowing: A response to “The Internet Ruins Everything”

David Weinberger

Quentin Hardy has written up on the NYT Bits blog the talk I gave at UC Berkeley’s School of Information a few days ago, refracting it through his intelligence and interests. It’s a terrific post and I appreciate it. want to amplify the answer I gave to Quentin’s question at the event. The bit about truth starts at 46:36.

[2b2k] Science as social object

David Weinberger

” The results provided by search engines “may all be linked in a self-reinforcing informational spiral…”[3] This leads them to ask an important question: Is the World Wide Web opening up a new world of easily accessible scientific information to lay audiences with just a few clicks? But all is not rosy. Mater.

Kew Gardens adopts Web principles for real-world wayfinding

David Weinberger

” From the abstract: In October 2010, Kew Gardens commissioned an in-depth study of visitors’ motivations and information needs around its 300-acre site, with the express aim that it should guide the development of new mobile apps. Hat-tip to Hanan Cohen for the link

Italy’s Declaration of Internet Rights

David Weinberger

The bill aims to inform the debate about online civil liberties and fundamental freedoms during the Italian semester of the European Union presidency… I like the document a lot. A lot a lot. For more information, I strongly recommend the TechPresident article by Fabio Chiusi TechPresident explains that this came about.

[avignon] President Sarkozy

David Weinberger

Omitting key information. They move us into the grand hall — vaulted ceilings — for a talk by Pres. Nikolas Sarkozy. Sarkozy has not exactly been a friend of the Internet. The last time I heard him talk was at LeWeb when he was a candidate. NOTE: Live-blogging. Getting things wrong. Missing points. Over-emphasizing small matters.

We are the medium

David Weinberger

McLuhan was reacting against information science’s view of a medium as that through which a signal (or message) passes. Information science purposefully abstracted itself from every and any particular medium, aiming at theories that held whether you were talking about tin can telephones or an inter-planetary Web. tweet about it.

What the Internet actually is: A reminder for policy-makers

David Weinberger

According to Wikipdia, the FNC was “was chartered by the US National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on Computing, Information and Communications (CCIC) to act as a forum for networking collaborations among US federal agencies…” It was dissolved in 1997. But its words are still good. More than good.

[sogeti] Andrew Keen on Vertigo and Big Data

David Weinberger

Omitting key information. Andrew Keen is speaking. (I liveblogged him this spring when he talked at a Sogeti conference.) His talk’s title: “How today’s online social revolution is dividing, diminishing, and disorienting us.” NOTE: Live-blogging. Getting things wrong. Missing points. Introducing artificial choppiness.

Data 54

David Weinberger - Untitled Article

David Weinberger

PS: No, I don’t know how to save the newspaper industry

Buy 53

Against hard cases

David Weinberger

Whether you or the solitary man on the track dies is of no interest to the utilitarian calculus, unless you throw in some more information, such as you are a reprobate who only has two weeks to live anyway, and the man on the tracks is an adorable baby whom we know will grow up to be the greatest Nobel Prize winner of them all.

[misc] I bet your ontology never thought of this one!

David Weinberger

For example, if you’re gathering information about books, you’d have a schema that has slots for title, author, date, publisher, etc. And I can see why that would be a crucial bit of information. The TBRC has a fantastic collection of Tibetan books.

[2b2k] The commoditizing and networking of facts

David Weinberger

In Wikidata you will be able to enter that information in a way that makes it processable by the computer. Ars Technica has a post about Wikidata , a proposed new project from the folks that brought you Wikipedia. there will be a discussion page, yes. [11:31] 2. every fact can always have references accompanying it. Literacy did this.

Restoring the Network of Bloggers

David Weinberger

It can also contain other information, such as your interests. And now we’re off and running in building a social network in which each person owns her own information in a literal and straightforward sense. (I know I haven’t done justice to FOAF, but I hope I haven’t been inaccurate in describing it.). Facebook did.

Getting the path from the Dropbox API

David Weinberger

Figuring out how to get that path information took me /for/ev/er. That function is passed information about the files that have been opened by the user in an array, but since I’m only allowing users to open one file at a time, the information is always going to be in the first and only element of that array. Someday.).

Data 24

Revolution, politics, and the Internet

David Weinberger

Omitting key information. Another guy had a network over there…We organized a lot of things to get the information out.” On November 11, I had the privilege of being on a panel with Slim Amamou (one of the leaders of the Tunisian revolution) and Rick Falkvinge (the founder of the Swedish Pirate Party). Getting things wrong.

Respect the Internet

David Weinberger

E.g., would you like to know that this morning I keynoted the Canadian Research Knowledge Network meeting outside of Ottawa, and that on Monday I gave the John Seely Brown lecture at the University of Michigan School of Information? The subtitle of the day is “Is marketing ruining the Net?” Networks tend toward transparency.

Micah Sifry: Why the Net’s effect on politics has disappointed us

David Weinberger

Our ability to get information now is amazing. It is not a perfect transcript of the event. and me. Kate Krontiris: Why did you write this book?

[berkman] Diana Kimball: Coding as a Liberal Art

David Weinberger

Omitting key information. Diana Kimball [twitter: dianakimball ] is giving a Berkman lunchtime talk on coding as a liberal art. She’s a Berkman Fellow and at the Harvard Business School. Here are some of her posts on this topic.). NOTE: Live-blogging. Getting things wrong. Missing points. Introducing artificial choppiness.

[berkman] From Freedom of Information to Open data … for open accountability

David Weinberger

Omitting key information. The Web is making the Freedom of Information Act (FOIOA) obsolete. 2. An open data policy is necessary to keep freedom of information up to date, and to move toward open accountability. One of the cornerstones of transparency policy is freedom of information regulation. Filipe L. Missing points.

Violate copyright? No Facebook for you!

David Weinberger

” No, there’s nothing even remotely Soviet about continuous surveillance that judges you via a bureaucracy without appeal, and punishes you by blocking access to information until you come back from re-education camp. According to TorrentFreak , a leaked AT&T training doc indicates that starting on Nov.

Clay Shirky: Why do comments suck?

David Weinberger

Omitting key information. At SCS13, Clay Shirky says that “Why do comments suck so bad?” ” is one of the questions that is perpetually asked in public discussions. So, what’s the answer? NOTE: Live-blogging. Getting things wrong. Missing points. Introducing artificial choppiness. Over-emphasizing small matters. Cheap.

Some ways Jews are different from Christians

David Weinberger

That text has been preserved letter by letter throughout the ages through some careful information-transmission techniques. For the holidays, here are some differences between Judaism and Christianity. Jews are a people. You are a Jew if your mother was a Jew. Even the cooking? What are you, crazy?). You can’t convert to Italian.

[nextweb] The Open Source Bank of Brewster

David Weinberger

Omitting key information. I’m at the Next Web conference in Amsterdam. From my end of the bell curve, most crowds are young.) 28 apps.