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Networked individuals trump organizations

Harold Jarche

2005 was the year when more than 50% of US workers’ occupations involved non-routine cognitive work, that long-awaited milestone. As hyperlinks subvert hierarchy , so does work fragmentation subvert organizations.

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: From Push to Pull

John Hagel

Pull and push approaches differ significantly in terms of how they organize and manage resources. Of course, all push approaches are not software programs – this is a broader metaphor to describe one way of organizing activities and resources.

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: The Aphrodisiac of Attention

John Hagel

One of my big regrets about missing Supernova 2005 was that I could not be there to hear Linda Stone in person - for my money, she is one of the most thoughtful people on the social implications of technology. Read More] Tracked on June 27, 2005 at 10:01 AM » Missed Opportunities?

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: The World Is Spiky

John Hagel

Tom in his best-selling new book says “The World Is Flat” and Richard in a new article in the October 2005 issue of Atlantic Monthly asserts “The World Is Spiky" Richard’s article is a great read (supported by highly visual maps) and I highly recommend it.

Should Employees Schedule Time To Be Social?

Dan Pontefract

All the way back in 2005, Molly McLure Wasko and Samer Faraj contributed research to MIS Quarterly entitled “Why Should I Share? 2005), pp. The more present and active you are in online communities, the more you and your organization benefits.

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Whose Job Is Leadership, Anyway?

Dan Pontefract

Between 1985 and 2005, the number of Americans who stated they felt satisfied with the way life was treating them decreased by roughly 30 per cent. Rather than life imitating art, is life imitating the organization instead? In my opinion, it is time for a Flat Army in our organizations.

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Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: Symposium on Social Architecture

John Hagel

The organizers (or is it “un-organizers”?) Posted by: Dave Bayless | November 11, 2005 at 08:52 PM Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by: | This is only a preview.

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: Ready for Web 3.0?

John Hagel

Phil has just returned from a gathering organized by JP to explore new principles of software architecture for the enterprise that he discusses here and here.

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: What is Web 2.0?

John Hagel

conference organized by Tim and others. Posted by John Hagel on September 25, 2005 | Permalink TrackBack TrackBack URL for this entry: [link] Listed below are links to weblogs that reference What is Web 2.0? : » What is Web 2.0?

stevenberlinjohnson.com: The Huddled Masses

Steven Berlin Johnson

It was one of those stranger-in-a-strange-land sights where you know there’s some organizing principle at work, but you can’t for the life of you figure out what it is. December 07, 2005 in Cities | Permalink Comments The comments to this entry are closed.

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: Dubai - Global Talent Magnet

John Hagel

This strategy is paying off – the World Tourism Organization recently declared Dubai to be the fastest growing tourism destination on earth. Posted by: Shloky | December 11, 2005 at 11:57 PM Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by: | This is only a preview.

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: Delphi, Detroit and Dead-Ends

John Hagel

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel Exploration of emerging innovations on a broad array of edges that are rising up to challenge the core About Recent Posts The Great Reset Passion and Flow Economic Recovery? Dont Count On It.

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: Confronting the Offshoring Challenge

John Hagel

Posted by John Hagel on July 27, 2005 | Permalink TrackBack TrackBack URL for this entry: [link] Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Confronting the Offshoring Challenge : » Sell Globally act Parochially from J.

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: Fragility of Globalization

John Hagel

He has a new article in the Spring 2005 issue of The National Interest entitled "Trading Places" (for some reason, on the cover of the print version of the quarterly, Druckers article has the more ominous title of "Our Mercantilist Future").

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: Goldhaber and Attention Economy

John Hagel

For example, he anticipated that all organizations would become temporary and that money would diminish in importance as a medium of exchange. Posted by: Frank Ruscica | June 05, 2005 at 02:57 PM Verify your Comment Previewing your Comment Posted by: | This is only a preview.

Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: Managing Critical Talent

John Hagel

Second, she correctly emphasizes that talent strategies must focus on the "critical talent" of the firm - "the first step is defining exactly which jobs are critical" - meaning "people who create the value an organization needs to succeed."

Are we addicted to the notification of notifications?

Dan Pontefract

Basex, a research firm based in America published a report in 2005 entitled, The Cost of Not Paying Attention: How Interruptions Impact Knowledge Workers Productivity. within the organization itself. internet mobile organization technology Email notifications

stevenberlinjohnson.com: The Strike

Steven Berlin Johnson

December 21, 2005 in Cities | Permalink Comments DOES IT MATTER TO YOU that the Observer may be presenting a skewed and deliberately manipulative view of things and that drawing on tired yet evocative themes like the "less affluent" is a patronising device they may be using to make "more affluent but basically well meaning" readers like you fall for simplistic positions? Posted by: roseg | December 22, 2005 at 03:42 AM What the above poster said.

stevenberlinjohnson.com: Why The Web Is Like A Rain Forest

Steven Berlin Johnson

A rain forest, on the other hand, is such an efficient system for using energy because there are so many organisms exploiting every tiny niche of the nutrient cycle. October 03, 2005 in Articles , Web | Permalink Comments Nice piece Steven. Cheers Posted by: Rikard Linde | October 03, 2005 at 07:26 AM Yes, I like the metaphor even though the ecological understanding is weak. Posted by: Lou Gold | October 05, 2005 at 07:01 AM sorry for my comments far from this achieve.

Global Warming and the Future

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

People who live in open, democratic, and supportive societies will succeed, and so empowered, people will tend to choose this form of organization. Eric write, It seems so strange/absurd, though, that most Newstrolls regulars never could "get it" despite all the evidence of the global warming urgency posted here over the years. And still don't get it, now.) Then again, maybe it was too late ten years ago, and we just didn't realize it.

Representing Events, Representing Knowledge

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

There is a long history of taxonomy, organization, and encyclopedia. A Propaedia is an attempt to make some sense of this body of knowledge, to, as suggested above, to organize knowledge. The rude response, that "we don't need old white men to tell us how knowledge is organized," and the more polite response, that "we don't have to organize the physical containers of knowledge," miss the nature and objective of what is being attempted.

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Contra Canadian Media

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

Again, mini-blogospheres -- along with other online communities of interest -- tend to be organized around narrow topics. Prompted by an article in Maisonneuve , the story is circulating once again that the Canadian blogosphere is impotent, that it should be more like its American counterpart and break some big stories. It all goes to foster the myth that we are somehow underdeveloped in Canada, that we would be so much better if only we were like the Americans.

Hate Crime Legislation

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

Nor is there any evidence of an organized campaign targeting jocks. What makes the current list of subjects - people of given race, nationality, sexual orientation, etc - the subject of hate crime legislation is the observation that they have been the targets of organized attempts to incite violence and that these attempts have been successful in sufficient numbers so as to warrant especial mention.

Preserving the Tradition (2)

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

I think there is some of this going on in the professional organizations in our field right now. David Wiley offers a measured, though contrary, commentary on my post. He writes, If people did not treasure and preserve the histories of their fields, not only would we not know about phlogiston theory, heleocentric orbits, and using leeches, but there would be nothing to keep us from making these same mistakes again.

On Surveillance

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

Re: Canada's Big Brother Plan to Reshape the Internet I think we should be clear that although terrorism is being touted as the reason for these new powers, the intent is to employ them much more broadly, to counteract organized crime generally. The chaos that can be caused on the network, for example by spammers and virus writers, and in society, by terrorists and organized crime, is sufficient to argue for some sort of constraint.

Principles for Evaluating Websites

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

If a news site is secretly sponsored by a religious organization, then the news site is untrustworthy. EDT, July 16, 2005. EDT, July 16, 2005. How do you know whether something you read on the web is true? You can’t know, at least, not for sure. This makes it important to read carefully and to evaluate what you read. This guide will tell you how. There Are No Authorities Authorities used to be people you could trust.

Snake Oil

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

Dietmar added, You say that these two want 'free' markets, but these two organizations are a contradiction in terms. If there really were 'free' markets, there would be no IMF, and WB, these are organs of govn't that interefere with free markets, they distort them. Re: Less Live 8; More Self Help Tim Worstall argues, "supply side reforms (no, the phrase does not just mean tax cuts, it means reform of the supply of things) will benefit development.

Kisangani

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

This international lending organization has contributed billions of dollars in loans to African nations, but these loans - usually used to pay off interest on previous loans - come with strings attached. I am watching Live 8 as I write this, rebroadcast on a Sunday morning on AOL, thankful to be able to witness this moment, and alternating between rage and hope. Africa has been the most exploited continent in the history of the world.

Infoway

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

Infoway itself is a non-profit organization constituted by Canadian federal and provincial deputy health ministers. Infoway has released a reference implementation on SourceForge: "IRIS (Infoway Reference Implementation Suite) is a demonstration of Electronic Health Record (EHR) interoperability messaging created by Canada Health Infoway. The project demonstrates and proves Patient Registry interoperability messaging using HL7 v3."

Springtime in Paris

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

We see where this is less conspicuously so, in the courtrooms and college campuses where the battle against punitive legislation such as the World Intellectual Property Organization treaties and the Digital Millennium Copyright Act is being taken to the street through guerilla filesharing tactics, underground networks , activism and protest.

Liberating Canada?

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

Then again, the Wall Street Journal is one of America's most blatant propaganda organs, its association with the facts tenuous at best. The idea that Canada needs liberating, much less by the United States, is laughable. But the Wall Street Journal declared this week that U.S. bloggers had done exactly that.

Being in Charge

Stephen Downes: Half an Hour

On the bottom rung of the organization chart. I think a lot about power. Today I was reading an article from Fast Company about Commander D. Michael Abrashoff of the USS Benford. The author stressed two things: first, that Abrashoff was able to lead effectively because he no longer cared about personal ambition - "I don't care if I ever get promoted again" - and because he talks with, and listens to, his men. This week, of course, the Pope dies. The Pope was another man in command.

Harold Jarche » Learning is Conversation

Harold Jarche

Watch Kiran Bir Sethi [link] no technology required Themes Complexity PKM Social Learning Work Literacy Threads Books Commons Communities Friday's Finds Informal Learning InternetTime Learning OpenSource Performance Improvement Technology Wirearchy Work jarche.com About Advertisers Clients Consulting Contact Français Key Posts Projects Toolbox Learning is Conversation Posted on December 1st, 2005 by Harold Jarche This is a remix and update of some previous posts. 2005). 2005).

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Bill Sullivan, CEO of Agilent Technologies is a Chief Engagement Officer

Dan Pontefract

Bill Sullivan was appointed CEO in March of 2005. They built out a leadership framework that was developed to ensure clarity and consistency of behaviours and practice throughout the organization, but it was developed for all employees and at a level that everyone would understand.

The Day SAP Ruined a Good Thing

Dan Pontefract

But first, let me explain the remarkable organization and team I was a part of for those five years. He (and later with John Schwarz at the helm as CEO) empowered both organizations to become one. This culture resonated throughout the organization.

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The Myths and The Reality of President Obama's CEO Summit

Steve Denning

Jim Cramer MSN Reality : Between 1980 and 2005, established organizations produced no new net jobs.

moving to social learning

Harold Jarche

In 2005 I wrote that the beauty of a decentralized social learning approach, versus a closed learning management system (LMS) was that each person keeps all of his/her content, and it does not get locked away in an inaccessible archive of a centrally controlled LMS.

Is hierarchy inevitable? Or is the end nigh?

Steve Denning

I’m currently reading The Three Ways of Getting Things Done: Hierarchy, Heterarchy and Responsible Autonomy in Organizations (Dorset, UK: Triarchy Press, 2005), a slender gem of a book by Gerard Fairtlough, which was recommended on this list by ParadigmLeaps.

Social learning is how work gets redesigned in the network era

Harold Jarche

Weisbord shows that even large group, participatory redesign efforts may not be good enough to deal with the rapid environmental changes all organizations face today in a networked world.

innovation in perpetual beta

Harold Jarche

A 2005 article on Network Structure & Innovation by Steve Borgatti defined two types of innovation networks based on the need for either individual creativity or interactive creativity.